Students and Schools | Connecticut Public Radio
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Students and Schools

Updated at 1:12 p.m. ET

The federal official in charge of protecting student borrowers from predatory lending practices has stepped down.

In a scathing resignation letter, Seth Frotman, who until now was the student loan ombudsman at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, says current leadership "has turned its back on young people and their financial futures." The letter was addressed to Mick Mulvaney, the bureau's acting director.

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Zack and Gillian Petrarca aren’t old enough to vote. But the teenage siblings say they are Team Hayes all the way.

Connecticut teachers are among the most prepared in the country to teach children how to read, according to a new report by the National Council on Teacher Quality.

Reading is considered the foundation of all other learning, so it stands to reason that teaching children how to read is also a big deal.

CHION WOLF / CONNECTICUT PUBLIC RADIO

Layoff notices went out Wednesday to 37 New Haven school staff members in the face of a budget deficit.

Most of the pink slips went to guidance counselors. Also laid off were several classroom teachers, library media specialists, and physical education teachers.

Zairys Maysonet

Over 30 Jewish, Muslim, and Christian teenagers came together on the New Haven Green Tuesday to paint a 48-foot sign welcoming refugees. 

David DesRoches / Connecticut Public Radio

A Willimantic charter school that's been embroiled in a controversy over its operations has decided to voluntarily close. 

Ingrid Henlon has been working in Hartford as an early childhood teacher for 27 years, but she said she hasn't gotten a raise in a decade.

"I'm a single person, and every year, you know, everything goes up," she said. "The light goes up, the gas goes up, the rent keep going up, but for the past couple of years my paycheck has been the consistent amount."

The New Haven Board of Education says it will direct the superintendent to reverse the layoff of hundreds of part-time employees, which was announced last week in an effort to cover a budget deficit.

It's a scene that many teachers are familiar with -- a student acts out, or even becomes violent, and it's unclear what to do.

In Connecticut, third- and fourth-graders study the history of their state. In many schools, students choose to research one person or event from an approved list. The people on that list have been mostly men, and all white.

Damaged houses in Salinas, Puerto Rico.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Dannel Malloy signed a bill on Tuesday that allows school districts to work together to help teach students from Puerto Rico who were displaced by Hurricane Maria. 

mikael altemark / Creative Commons

Connecticut school districts have been working over the last two years to comply with new privacy laws around student data, but many have been struggling to make the July 1, 2018 deadline.

Over the last nine months, Connecticut's weather has wreaked havoc on school schedules, especially those in the western part of the state that got hit by the recent tornado. So some districts leaders have said they won’t be able to provide the mandatory 180 days of instruction, so they’re asking the state for a waiver.

WNPR/David DesRoches

The state Department of Education has voted to consider closing a charter school in Willimantic, after the department found several problems with how the school has been managed. 

School Regionalization Results Mixed, Study Review Says

May 20, 2018
ccarlstead / Creative Commons

As Connecticut schools deal with shrinking enrollment in most towns and rising enrollment in some cities, the question being asked is this -- should schools be consolidated? 

Eastern Connecticut State University

Professors in the state university system say their voices aren't being heard, and they want more input as the college system deals with a growing budget deficit.

Home School Parents Say Regulations Are Not The Answer

May 9, 2018
WNPR/David DesRoches

For Erin Ring-Howell, home schooling her two kids was a practical choice.

Aaron Burden / Creative Commons

Connecticut families who choose to home-school their children are not required to show that their kids are actually learning anything. A new report from the state's Office of the Child Advocate found that holes in the system make it hard to track home-schooled kids who are abused and neglected.

David DesRoches / WNPR

New guidelines have been developed by Connecticut's education department that describe the process parents should use for their children to be evaluated for special education services. But concerns are being raised that the new guidelines would make it harder for parents, not easier, than under previous guidance. 

At schools across the country today, students are getting up from their desks and walking out when the clock strikes 10 a.m. They're participating in the National School Walkout, part of the movement that has taken hold among students to call for action to end gun violence.

Today marks 19 years since the shooting at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo., in which two high school students shot and killed thirteen people.

When Lane Murdock, a high school sophomore, heard that 17 high school students and educators had been killed in a shooting in Parkland, Fla., she says she felt numb.

To her, and so many others, mass shootings can feel all too common in the U.S.

"In the time I've been in high school we've had the Pulse, Las Vegas and now, [the Parkland] shooting," Murdock says.

Werwin15, Creative Commons

Connecticut's graduation rate is now the highest on record, state officials said Monday. Last year, 87.9 percent of high school seniors graduated. That's about five points higher than the national average. The graduation rate gap between students of color and white students also shrank.

College of DuPage / Creative Commons

A large number of Connecticut high school graduates don't get a college degree within six years of leaving high school. But there's not a lot of information on what they're actually up to.

"I'm 54 years old and my paycheck is $1,980 [a month]. I can't afford f****** health insurance."

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The system that oversees private special education schools in Connecticut needs an overhaul, according to a recent state audit. About 3,000 students with severe needs are currently placed in these schools, mostly at the expense of public school districts.

Quinnipiac University's NAMI chapter handed out materials on mental health services.
Quinnipiac NAMI Chapter Photo

As anxiety and depression among college students soars, universities in Connecticut and nationally are expanding their mental health counseling, even offering courses that address mental well-being.

Students in Hartford join the national walkout over gun violence.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Correction: An earlier version of this story incorrectly said that district administrators in Stonington did not respond to a request for comment. In fact, Stonington High School Principal Mark Friese responded to WNPR in an email before the story was published, and he provided his account of the day’s events, which is now included.

Stonington High School junior Caroline Morehouse was excited when she learned that her school would allow students to walkout of class to protest gun violence in a nationwide day of action on March 14. She'd be standing in solidarity with students from Parkland, Florida, who only a month earlier had lost 17 classmates in yet another school shooting.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The March For Our Lives event in East Haddam was one of 12 happening in Connecticut—and more than 800 across the globe for that matter. 

An earlier rally in Washington D.C. after the school shooting in Parkland, Florida.
Victoria Pickering / Creative Commons

The “March For Our Lives” takes place in various cities across the country this weekend. In Connecticut, Tyler Suarez, a freshman at the University of Bridgeport helped put together the march in Hartford.

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