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Michael Hamann / Creative Commons

Private Wells in Connecticut Get A Closer Look For Natural Contaminants

Jim Webb has been drinking the tap water in his Glastonbury home for 15 years. When he first bought the house, he got the water tested, because it comes from a private well. “It came back perfect,” he said. “The gentleman said, this is equivalent of spring water. So that was great.” It meant that a testing lab ran the water sample and found it clear of things like pesticides, lead, sulfates and other contaminants. But back then, they didn’t screen for high levels of radon or uranium, a type of metal.

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Petteri Jarvinen / Flickr

Heat Wave Expected This Weekend In Connecticut

The forecast projects one of the hottest weekends across Connecticut so far this year, with temperatures expected to rise into the triple digits.

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Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Puerto Ricans are vowing to continue their protests of the island’s leadership until one major demand is met.

Michael Hamann / Creative Commons

Jim Webb has been drinking the tap water in his Glastonbury home for 15 years. When he first bought the house, he got the water tested, because it comes from a private well.

“It came back perfect,” he said. “The gentleman said, this is equivalent of spring water. So that was great.”

It meant that a testing lab ran the water sample and found it clear of things like pesticides, lead, sulfates and other contaminants. But back then, they didn’t screen for high levels of radon or uranium, a type of metal.

Courtesy: NEAG School of Education, UConn

The State Board of Education voted six to one Thursday to endorse Gov. Ned Lamont’s selection of Miguel Cardona, Meriden’s assistant superintendent, as the state’s next education commission. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Saturday, July 20th marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing. Several Connecticut companies played an important role in the historic mission.

82 year-old Donald Rethke was a mechanical engineer at Hamilton Standard in Windsor Locks in 1969. He helped design the life support systems and the heating system on the lunar module used in the moon landing.

Updated at 4:11 p.m. ET

More than 3,100 people will leave Bureau of Prisons custody starting Friday, part of what Justice Department officials call "a truly monumental effort" to comply with the First Step Act, a criminal justice law passed by Congress last year.

Most of the offenders being freed have been convicted of drug-related crimes and have been living in halfway houses across the United States in preparation for their release, acting BOP chief Hugh Hurwitz told reporters at a news conference in Washington.

The Netherlands' Supreme Court has affirmed that the country's troops are partly to blame for the deaths of 350 Muslim men and boys after the fall of the Bosnian enclave of Srebrenica. But in a break with an earlier ruling, the court lowered the Dutch liability for the massacre to 10%, from 30%.

The racist rhetoric from President Trump attacking four freshmen Democratic women, who he tweeted should "go back" to their countries of origin, escalated Wednesday night at his campaign rally in North Carolina.

"Send her back," the crowd chanted, during a riff in which the president criticized Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar, a Somali-born American citizen from Minnesota.

Petteri Jarvinen / Flickr

The forecast projects one of the hottest weekends across Connecticut so far this year, with temperatures expected to rise into the triple digits. 

Updated July 19 at 12:25 p.m. ET

Mark Morgan, acting head of Customs and Border Protection, said on Thursday that his agency is rolling out the Trump administration's new asylum rule as a small "pilot" for now but that officials expect it to be blocked in court.

Most days, 25-year-old Chavonne can push her student loan debt to the back of her mind.

Between short-term office jobs in the Washington, D.C., area, she drives for Uber. But once in awhile, a debt collector will get hold of her cellphone number — the one she keeps changing to avoid them — and it all comes back fresh. "I'll be like, 'Oh no!' " she says. "It's a sad reminder that I owe somebody money!"

In April, she got another reminder when the government seized her tax refund.

All this for a degree she never finished.

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More From Connecticut Public Radio

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Immigration Advocates To Trump: No More Raids

The United States Court House building in Hartford is home to an office of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement or ICE, which has recently been directed by President Donald Trump and his administration to carry out mass raids and deportations in major cities of undocumented immigrants.

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Exploration

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Engineer Recalls His Role In Historic Moon Landing

Saturday, July 20th marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing. Several Connecticut companies played an important role in the historic mission. 82 year-old Donald Rethke was a mechanical engineer at Hamilton Standard in Windsor Locks in 1969. He helped design the life support systems and the heating system on the lunar module used in the moon landing.

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Culture

File Photo

Libraries Across Connecticut Are Eliminating Overdue Fines

For generations, librarians assumed the threat of fines incentivized people to bring back books on time. But lately, that assumption has been coming under scrutiny, leaving many librarians to wonder if the idea of fines is one whose time may be past due.

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The Beaker

Snapshots Of A Controlled Burn On Connecticut's Coast

Recently, part of Harkness Memorial State Park caught fire.

Connecticut Public Radio is working with other stations to focus on the role of guns in American life.

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