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Guns

Poll: Americans, Including Republicans And Gun Owners, Broadly Support Red Flag Laws

Strong majorities of Americans from across the political spectrum support laws that allow family members or law enforcement to petition a judge to temporarily remove guns from a person who is seen to be a risk to themselves or others, according to a new APM Research Lab/Guns & America/Call To Mind survey. These laws, often called extreme risk protection order laws, or red flag laws, have received renewed attention after 31 people were killed during mass shootings in El Paso, Texas , and...

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Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Teens Focus On Strategies For Curbing Gun Violence Within Communities

A group of teens from the Greater Hartford area spent their summer talking about and brainstorming solutions to gun violence within their communities. The Summer Youth Leadership Academy presented their solutions this week to city officials, community members and law enforcement under four umbrellas: accountability, preventing violence between youth, rehabilitation, and changing our violent culture.

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Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

At 8:30 a.m. on a Friday morning in Torrington, a group of counselors in lime green shirts gathered around the flag pole at Camp MOE for a quick game of WAH.

It was the last day of camp for the season — they were waiting for director Katherine Marchand-Beyer to make the morning announcements before children arrive.

“This is the last time I’ll say this to you guys,” Marchand-Beyer said. “It means so much to our campers to have your attention today. They love you dearly, they are attached to you, you are their heroes, they aren’t going to forget you.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

A group of teens from the Greater Hartford area spent their summer talking about and brainstorming solutions to gun violence within their communities. The Summer Youth Leadership Academy presented their solutions this week to city officials, community members and law enforcement under four umbrellas: accountability, preventing violence between youth, rehabilitation, and changing our violent culture.

Why does e-cigarette maker Juul advertise its product on TV when cigarette ads are banned? The short answer: Because it can.

For nearly 50 years, cigarette advertising has been banned from TV and radio. But electronic cigarettes — those battery-operated devices that often resemble oversized USB flash drives with flavored nicotine "pods" that clip in on the end — aren't addressed in the law.

Pexels

Catholics in Connecticut are reacting to the news that Diocese in four New England states launched a confidential online reporting system for abuse last week. One of the Connecticut Diocese launched a similar system back in March. 

Strong majorities of Americans from across the political spectrum support laws that allow family members or law enforcement to petition a judge to temporarily remove guns from a person who is seen to be a risk to themselves or others, according to a new APM Research Lab/Guns & America/Call To Mind survey.

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

After three years, the city of New Haven and the police union have finally reached a contract agreement.

Police union members on Friday overwhelmingly approved the contract by a vote of 259 to 13, after ongoing negotiations, and then a binding arbitration process. New Haven Mayor Toni Harp said part of the goal is to retain recruits and attract new police officers to the city. 

Updated at 5:45 p.m.

The head of MGM Springfield said the city is in better shape than it was before it opened as the casino approaches its one-year anniversary on August 24. 

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

In recent years, an invasive insect called the gyspy moth has spelled doom for countless New England trees. From 2016 through 2018, it’s estimated gyspy moths defoliated more than 2 million acres in southern New England, which means a lot of cleanup for foresters.

But among all that destruction there is some good news: gyspy moth populations are, finally, declining.  

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Senator Richard Blumenthal is warning consumers about a proposal from the federal government that could force them to pay more for potentially inadequate repairs if they're involved in a car accident.

Updated at 5:37 p.m. ET

Planned Parenthood is leaving the federal Title X family planning program rather than comply with new Trump administration rules regarding abortion counseling.

The new rules, issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services earlier this year, prohibit Title X grantees from providing or referring patients for abortion, except in cases of rape, incest or medical emergency.

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More From Connecticut Public Radio

5 Takeaways For New England From U.N. Report On Climate Change And Land Use

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is out with a new report Thursday examining how land use  contributes to climate change and other environmental problems. The report, Climate Change and Land, is the second of three special reports from the United Nations panel. Global Warming of 1.5ºC was published last October, and a third report about oceans and the frozen world is expected later this year. While this new report is global in scope and particularly focuses on desertification,...

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Environment

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Gypsy Moths On The Decline — For Now — But Damage Is Already Done

In recent years, an invasive insect called the gyspy moth has spelled doom for countless New England trees. From 2016 through 2018, it’s estimated gyspy moths defoliated more than 2 million acres in southern New England, which means a lot of cleanup for foresters. But among all that destruction there is some good news: gyspy moth populations are, finally, declining.

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Inbox

Special Reporting Project

Making Sense

Deaf Children and the Choices Their Parents Face

Health Care

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Alzheimer's Patients Show Cognitive Improvement After Treatment With New Medical Device

A potential new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease -- partly based on technology developed in Connecticut -- has proven in an early clinical trial to reverse some of the cognitive decline which is a hallmark of the disease.

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The Beaker

Snapshots Of A Controlled Burn On Connecticut's Coast

Recently, part of Harkness Memorial State Park caught fire.

Connecticut Public Radio is working with other stations to focus on the role of guns in American life.

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