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Coronavirus

Biden Praises Senate Passage Of 'Desperately Needed' COVID-19 Relief Bill

In remarks after a divided Senate approved his $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief plan, President Biden praised lawmakers for securing the additional round of aid and thanked the American people for making it possible through their "overwhelming bipartisan support." The "American Rescue Plan" has been a priority of the Biden administration, and is poised to deliver a fresh round of financial assistance to individuals, families, schools and businesses hard hit by the coronavirus pandemic....

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Gov. Ned Lamont. On the wall behind him is a Normal Rockwell original, "Right to Know."
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Ned Lamont’s Year In The Shadow Of COVID

Hanging behind Gov. Ned Lamont’s desk is the painting “Right to Know.” Norman Rockwell completed it in 1968, years after the artist best known for folksy Saturday Evening Post illustrations had turned to serious themes, including distrust in government.

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As Republicans in statehouses across the country introduce hundreds of bills raising barriers to vote, President Biden is issuing a new executive order signaling his administration's commitment to expanding, not shrinking, voting access and rights.

The Perseverance rover took its first test drive on the surface of Mars this week, traversing some 21 feet of terrain in a short trip that scientists say represents a major milestone.

To millions of people around the world, the young poet Amanda Gorman represents hope, change and the promise of a better America.

But to a security guard on Friday night, the young African American woman represented a potential threat to public safety.

The Harvard-educated Gorman, who won wide acclaim with her inauguration poem urging the nation to confront the injustices of the past and work to create a better future, says she was tailed by a security guard on her walk home.

This weekend marks 56 years since civil rights marchers were attacked by Alabama state troopers on a day now known as "Bloody Sunday." The annual commemoration will be different this year — there's a pandemic, a new president and perhaps most notably, one missing voice.

On March, 7 1965, the late John Lewis and other civil rights leaders led a march from Selma to Montgomery to demonstrate for voting rights. While crossing onto the Edmund Pettus Bridge, the peaceful demonstrators, including Lewis, were brutally beaten by police.

Ned Lamont’s Year In The Shadow Of COVID

Mar 5, 2021
Gov. Ned Lamont. On the wall behind him is a Normal Rockwell original, "Right to Know."
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Hanging behind Gov. Ned Lamont’s desk is the painting “Right to Know.” Norman Rockwell completed it in 1968, years after the artist best known for folksy Saturday Evening Post illustrations had turned to serious themes, including distrust in government.

Hiring picked up steam in February as a winter wave of coronavirus infections eased and consumers spent more freely.

U.S. employers added 379,000 jobs in February, while the unemployment rate dipped to 6.2%.

BEIJING, China — China's legislature is debating draft guidelines that would drastically overhaul Hong Kong's electoral system to give Beijing near total control over the region's election outcomes.

While Beijing has not publicized the details of the proposals, it has outlined broad changes that would effectively allow Beijing to vet candidates for Hong Kong's legislative council and pack an election committee which chooses the region's chief executive.

One year after the coronavirus pandemic shuttered classrooms around the country and the world, U.S. parents are guardedly optimistic about the academic and social development of their children, an NPR/Ipsos poll finds.

But 62% of parents say their child's education has been disrupted. And, more than 4 out of 5 would like to see schools provide targeted extra services to help their kids catch up. This includes just over half of parents who support the idea of summer school.

The number of refugees has soared over the past four years, with more than 26 million refugees worldwide as of mid-2020, according to the United Nations refugee agency.

Frank Franklin II / Associated Press

A lawsuit filed by a Connecticut woman over images of enslaved people has been dismissed by a Massachusetts judge. Tamara Lanier sued Harvard University two years ago to force the release of the rights to pictures of two people she says are her enslaved ancestors.

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Radical Black Art and Performance series / Facebook

BIPOC, LGBTQ Artists The Focus Of UConn Virtual Series

The Radical Black Art and Performance Series features virtual performances, film screenings, discussions and workshops by LGBTQ artists and scholars of color.

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Coronavirus In Connecticut

Tracking COVID Data: Vaccinations, Hospitalizations & Your Town's Infection Rate

Vaccinations continue across Connecticut with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting Friday a total of 1,421,045 doses have been distributed to the state and 1,121,517 doses have been administered. So far, about 22.2 % of Connecticut’s population has received at least one vaccine dose and 8.9% are fully vaccinated, according to CDC data.

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