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Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Taking The Chance: A Patient's View On New Alzheimer's Treatment

Debra and Paul McAlenney were at their home in Simsbury on a recent Tuesday morning watching their 5-year-old grandson, Hudson, while his parents worked. Hudson spends a couple of days during the week with his grandparents, or as he refers to them, Nana and Bacon.

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The Connecticut State Capitol Building
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Wins And Losses: How Environmental Bills Fared This Session

The recently completed legislative session notched a number of wins -- but also some losses -- for environmentalists. Advocates hailed improvements to Connecticut’s “bottle bill” but expressed disappointment with lawmakers’ failure to sign on to a multistate program aimed at reducing vehicle emissions.

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BATON ROUGE, La. — The children of a Black man killed by police in Louisiana's capital city five years ago have accepted a $4.5 million settlement from the local government, the man's family and the city's mayor said Friday.

Alton Sterling's 2016 shooting by a Baton Rouge police officer was captured on video and sparked anger and protests in the city's Black community.

The Connecticut State Capitol Building
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

From 24-hour-long zoom public hearings to a Capitol closed to the public, 2021’s legislative session was like no other.

This hour, we recap what happened in the Connecticut General Assembly, and find out what legislation passed and what didn’t.

The first results from a large efficacy study of a new kind of COVID-19 vaccine are now out, and they are good. Very good.

According to Novavax, the vaccine's manufacturer, it had a 100% efficacy against the original strain of the coronavirus and 93% efficacy against more worrisome variants that have subsequently appeared.

Updated June 14, 2021 at 12:16 PM ET

TARRYTOWN, N.Y. (AP) — The flavor of the year at the Westminster Kennel Club dog show: Wasabi.

A Pekingese named Wasabi won best in show Sunday night, notching a fifth-ever win for the unmistakable toy breed. A whippet named Bourbon repeated as runner-up.

Waddling through a small-but-mighty turn in the ring, Wasabi nabbed U.S. dogdom's most prestigious prize after winning the big American Kennel Club National Championship in 2019.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Debra and Paul McAlenney were at their home in Simsbury on a recent Tuesday morning watching their 5-year-old grandson, Hudson, while his parents worked.

Hudson spends a couple of days during the week with his grandparents, or as he refers to them, Nana and Bacon.

One woman is dead after a man drove into a crowd of protesters late Sunday night in Minneapolis. The suspect is in custody, according to the city's police department.

Demonstrators were gathered to protest the June 3 shooting death of Winston Boogie Smith Jr., a 33-year-old Black man, by U.S. marshals in Minneapolis. At about 11:39 p.m. Sunday, a car sped into protesters that were standing along Lake Street and Girard Avenue in the city's Uptown area, hitting and injuring at least three people.

Studying the brains of fruit flies is not the kind of work that you can easily do from home. You need special microscopes and something called a fly-ball tracker, which neuroscientist Vivek Jayaraman likens to a treadmill. A very tiny treadmill.

"We position them on a little ball. The fly walks on the ball. It's in a virtual reality space," explains Jayaraman in his lab at the Janelia Research Campus, part of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

DATONG, China — The walls and ceiling of the Nanshan mine shimmer black, carved straight into a 200 million-year-old coal seam running 1,300 feet underground. Black veins of Jurassic-era coal deposits still thread Shanxi province in China's north, enriching public coffers and keeping generations of miners steadily employed.

Mark Pazniokas / CT Mirror

Mothers and wives of loved ones who have spent time in prison, and the formerly incarcerated themselves, gathered outside the Capitol on June 7 to celebrate.

In the previous 48 hours, the House and Senate had passed a bill that would limit the Department of Correction’s use of solitary confinement, a victory decades in the making for community members who have long fought to end the practice. Stop Solitary CT called a rally to implore the governor to sign the bill.

People recovering from a stroke will soon have access to a device that can help restore a disabled hand.

The Food And Drug Administration has authorized a device called IpsiHand, which uses signals from the uninjured side of a patient's brain to help rewire circuits controlling the hand, wrist and arm.

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More From Connecticut Public

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Hartford Is Burning Its Recycling, And It's Costing The City $30K A Month

That recycling you put out each week in the blue bin may not be going where you think it is. Because of contamination in curbside bins, the city of Hartford is now redirecting most of its recycling to a nearby incinerator, which means tons and tons of recyclable materials are going to waste while the city spends about $30,000 a month trying to deal with the problem.

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Coronavirus In Connecticut

Tracking COVID Data: Vaccinations, Hospitalizations & Your Town's Infection Rate

Vaccinations continue across Connecticut with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reporting Sunday a total of 4,640,115 doses have been distributed to the state and 4,211,345 doses have been administered. So far, about 65.1 % of Connecticut’s population has received at least one vaccine dose and 56.9% are fully vaccinated, according to CDC data.

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CURIOUS Q & A

Colin covers topics that vary widely from day to day. Listen to hear a thoughtful, smart, interesting conversation with amazing guests. Every day at 1 pm and 9 pm.

Seasoned

Explore our state’s seasonal ingredients and the passionate people who grow and cook our food.

Disrupted

Join Khalilah Brown-Dean as she explores the disruptions of 2020 to find something more inclusive, and more effective.

Transcend assumptions. Humanize the stereotyped. Understand the misunderstood.