Connecticut Public Radio | Media for the curious
WNPR

Coronavirus

Ingmar Riveros (left) and Peruvian refugee Xiomy De la Cruz (right) serve 150 families from their food pantry in a store basement in Hartford on Nov. 19. Many of the families are undocumented and severely impacted by the pandemic.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Immigrant Woman Starts Food Pantry In Her Home To Help Undocumented Families

Early in the pandemic, Xiomy De la Cruz was working at a fast-food restaurant when her work hours were cut back. She is a Peruvian refugee and a single mother with two children and another on the way. Like many families, she found herself in various pantry lines to make ends meet.

Read More
SIPA VIA AP IMAGES

Conn. Hospitals, Health Systems Accelerate COVID-19 Vaccine Storage And Planning Ahead Of Delivery

The federal government could grant emergency use authorization to COVID-19 vaccines as soon as next week, potentially getting doses in the hands of Connecticut hospitals by mid-December. While official statewide distribution plans are still being finalized, health providers do know enough about the upcoming vaccines in order to take some immediate steps in preparation, with little time to spare.

Read More

President-elect Joe Biden has tapped former Obama aide Brian Deese as director of the National Economic Council, his top economic adviser at the White House.

Deese helped former President Barack Obama rescue the auto industry during the 2009 economic crisis and played a key role in negotiating the Paris climate accords.

But the pick raised the ire of some progressive groups even before it was made official Thursday because of Deese's work for BlackRock, the world's largest asset manager.

No U.S. city suffered more in the first wave of the coronavirus pandemic than New York City, where more than 24,000 people died, mainly in the spring. Medical workers in New York learned exactly how difficult and dangerous things can get when hospitals are overwhelmed, and now they are bracing themselves as infections begin to rise again.

Ingmar Riveros (left) and Peruvian refugee Xiomy De la Cruz (right) serve 150 families from their food pantry in a store basement in Hartford on Nov. 19. Many of the families are undocumented and severely impacted by the pandemic.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Early in the pandemic, Xiomy De la Cruz was working at a fast-food restaurant when her work hours were cut back. She is a Peruvian refugee and a single mother with two children and another on the way. Like many families, she found herself in various pantry lines to make ends meet.

Gitanjali Rao, a Colorado teenager who invented a mobile device to test for lead in drinking water, is Time's Kid of the Year for 2020. The magazine announced the award Thursday, citing Rao's ability to apply scientific ideas to real-world problems — and her desire to motivate other kids to take up their own causes.

Weeping Norway Spruce
mwms1916 (Flickr / Creative Commons)

It's taken me awhile to appreciate weeping evergreen trees. For the longest time they reminded me of illustrations from a Dr. Seuss children's book. But used properly, weeping evergreens can be an amazing focal point in your garden and provide winter interest. 

Who better to promote a product than a former president? How about three?

Former Presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush and Bill Clinton are willing to lend their star power for a good cause, saying this week that they would publicly take a coronavirus vaccine, once it's available in the U.S., to encourage skeptical Americans to do the same.

Obama said that if Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country's top infectious disease expert, thought the vaccine was safe and effective, then he would get his shot.

Looking back, Sam Bloechl knows that when the health insurance broker who was helping him find a plan asked whether he'd ever been diagnosed with a major illness, that should have been a red flag. Preexisting medical conditions don't matter when you buy a comprehensive individual plan that complies with the Affordable Care Act. Insurers can't turn people down or charge them more based on their medical history.

High-profile supporters of President Trump took the stage in Georgia on Wednesday to spread conspiracy theories and tell the state's Republicans not to vote in the crucial U.S. Senate runoffs there next month. The outcome of those races will determine which party controls the Senate next year.

At the rally in Atlanta, pro-Trump attorney Lin Wood took the microphone to tell the crowd that last month's election, won by Joe Biden, had been manipulated.

Before President-elect Joe Biden had even formally introduced his intended nominee for budget director, the pushback started rolling in.

Neera Tanden would make history as the first woman of color to head the Office of Management and Budget, but she's also been an outspoken partisan warrior, and that could complicate her confirmation process, especially if Republicans maintain control of the Senate after Georgia's two runoff races in January.

SIPA VIA AP IMAGES

The federal government could grant emergency use authorization to COVID-19 vaccines as soon as next week, potentially getting doses in the hands of Connecticut hospitals by mid-December.

While official statewide distribution plans are still being finalized, health providers do know enough about the upcoming vaccines in order to take some immediate steps in preparation, with little time to spare. 

Pages

More From Connecticut Public

John Abbott / Facebook

In Their Own Words: Yale Project Asks Prominent Musicians About Their Pandemic Experience

A new project by Yale’s Oral History of American Music chronicles how the pandemic and months of self-isolation have affected prominent musicians. Alone Together: Musicians in the Time of Covid is a collection of thoughtful and surprising interviews with performers, conductors and composers from the world of jazz and classical music.

Read More

CT COVID-19 Map

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public

Map: 151 Connecticut Towns Now At COVID-19 'Red' Alert, 6 More At 'Orange'

State public health officials say 151 towns are now at the highest alert level for COVID-19.

Read More

The 2020 NPR Book Concierge Is Live

CURIOUS Q & A

Seasoned

Explore our state’s seasonal ingredients and the passionate people who grow and cook our food.

Transcend assumptions. Humanize the stereotyped. Understand the misunderstood.

Disrupted

Join Khalilah Brown-Dean as she explores the disruptions of 2020 to find something more inclusive, and more effective.

Call in to talk to host Lucy Nalpathanchil where we highlight CT's diverse communities. We want to hear your stories! Every day (except Wed.) at 9 am and 8 pm.
Colin covers topics that vary widely from day to day. Listen to hear a thoughtful, smart, interesting conversation with amazing guests. Every day at 1 pm and 9 pm.
Connecticut's best journalists come out of the political trenches every Wednesday at 9 am and 8 pm for our weekly news roundtable.
Our weekly show is about all of New England, America's oldest place, at a time of change. Every Thursday at 2 pm and Sundays at 6 pm.