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Election 2020

With Stops In 4 Key States, Biden And Trump Bring Their Closing Arguments To Voters

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET A few dozen cars at a drive-in rally in suburban Pennsylvania honked in unison as Democratic nominee Joe Biden blasted President Trump's handling of the coronavirus. In North Carolina, Trump told a packed crowd: "COVID, COVID, COVID. By the way, on Nov. 4, you won't hear about it anymore." With 10 days to go before Election Day, the president is zipping across the country on Air Force One, holding large rallies and trying to replicate the energy of his first campaign's...

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courtesy Ekonk Hill Turkey Farm

CT Turkey Farmers Expect Higher Demand For Smaller Turkeys

Turkey growers describe this time of year as the industry’s Super Bowl, when orders for turkeys start rolling in. But Thanksgiving will be different this year because of the pandemic. Rick Hermonot said it’s still a little early to know how many people will order smaller turkeys from his farm in Sterling. “We’re wondering because folks are not having as large a gathering,” he said. “But orders have been coming in so far. They look pretty typical. People wanting 12-pounders all the way up to...

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The day after the 2016 presidential election, David Nastri, like many, couldn’t believe his candidate had won. Then he ran into one of his friends. She was crying, in disbelief that so many Americans had chosen Donald Trump.

“And I said, you know, ‘What do you think of me?’” Nastri recalls asking her. “And she said, ‘Oh, I love you, you’re awesome.’ And I said, ‘I voted for him.’  ‘How could you do that?’ she said. And I said, ‘It’s a big country, he’s not gonna break it.’ I think that’s been borne out, he didn’t break it. He’s improved a lot of it.”

The Connecticut Center for Economic Analysis at UConn issued a grim forecast for the state’s economy Friday.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut likely will struggle for a decade or longer to undo the economic damage created by the coronavirus pandemic, a University of Connecticut think tank warned Friday.

In its first long-term forecast, the Connecticut Center for Economic Analysis also warned the state was headed for financial trouble even before the pandemic struck, having failed for more than a decade to make vital investments in information technology.

courtesy Ekonk Hill Turkey Farm

Turkey growers describe this time of year as the industry’s Super Bowl, when orders for turkeys start rolling in. But Thanksgiving will be different this year because of the pandemic.

Rick Hermonot said it’s still a little early to know how many people will order smaller turkeys from his farm in Sterling.

“We’re wondering because folks are not having as large a gathering,” he said. “But orders have been coming in so far. They look pretty typical. People wanting 12-pounders all the way up to people wanting 35- or 40-pounders.”

Constitution Plaza in downtown Hartford.
Henk Sijgers / Creative Commons

What if the work-at-home trend becomes permanent? What will happen to Connecticut’s downtowns? Economist Victor Calanog of Moody’s Analytics joined All Things Considered to opine on whether downtowns are as good as dead. He also broke down what he thinks city planners should be doing right now to prepare.

Backus Nurses' Union Reaches Deal With Hospital Over New Contract

Oct 22, 2020
Nurses stand on the picket line on Oct. 13 outside Backus Hospital in Norwich. They have asked the hospital to provide sufficient protective gear and offer fair pay to retain experienced workers.
Yehyun Kim / CTMirror.org

A union representing more than 400 nurses at Backus Hospital approved by a near-unanimous vote on Wednesday a new, four-year contract that includes pay increases and ends a weeks-long standoff between the hospital and employees that triggered a two-day nurses’ strike.

The Senate Judiciary Committee voted Thursday to advance the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court. But the roll call vote was also notable for its silence from Democrats. 

As the committee clerk read off a list of names, she got no answer from several senators. The reason was simple: Those senators, including Connecticut’s Richard Blumenthal, weren’t there. 

Alonso Nichols

Liliana Cruz of Boston has just been selected for a school desegregation program. At dawn, she takes the bus to a mostly-white high school in the suburbs. There she makes friends, endures microagressions and racism, wrestles with her identity and finds her voice. That's the premise of Jennifer De Leon's debut novel “Don’t Ask Me Where I’m From,” which came out this year. 

Frank Fontana and his daughter, Liz Marciano, visit Sharon Fontana at Kimberly Hall North in Windsor.
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

When COVID-19 cases shot up in New London this month, Bill White, whose family owns the Beechwood Post-Acute & Transitional Care Center there, began to worry about visitors bringing the disease into the facility.

Federal and state guidelines were changed recently to allow indoor visitations at nursing homes, but the rules don’t require guests to be tested for coronavirus. White worried that would leave his facility vulnerable to an outbreak.

Updated Friday at 10:04 a.m. ET

A second federal court has blocked the Trump administration's attempt to make an unprecedented change to who is counted in the census numbers that determine each state's share of seats in Congress.

A three-judge panel — which includes 9th Circuit Judge Richard Clifton, as well as U.S. District Judge Lucy Koh and Judge Edward Chen in Northern California — issued the new court order Thursday.

Bennilover (Flickr / Creative Commons)

Halloween is right around the corner and many gardeners are decorating pumpkins for the holiday. A fun way to decorate is to make a pumpkin planter filled with succulents.

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More From Connecticut Public

Elodie Reed / Vermont Public Radio

Lessons Lost: The Struggle In Some New England Classrooms To Talk About Race

What we don’t learn in school can matter as much as the lessons we do learn. In this fourth and final episode of a special radio series on “Racism In New England,” we talk to teachers and students about the harm of omitting stories and cultures from curricula — and how we can do better.

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The Coronavirus Crisis

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Daily Health Updates

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WCN 24/7 / Flickr

Connecticut’s capital city is experiencing another public health crisis amidst the pandemic -- an epidemic of gun violence.

There have been more than 50 shootings in Hartford since September.

This hour, we talk about what’s behind this disturbing rise in violence, and how to address it. Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin joins us and we hear from anti-violence advocates.

How should we make sense of a rise in shootings through a public health lens? We hear from an expert who used to lead the CDC’s national injury prevention center.

Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

The timeline on a COVID-19 vaccine is generally unknown, but whether one is approved this year or the next, Wizdom Powell said it won’t help much if Black residents lack confidence in its safety and effectiveness.

“There’s so many stories of Black folks surrendering their bodies to medical institutions and coming out worse after,” said Powell, who is director of the Health Disparities Institute at UConn Health. 

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