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Police Brutality

Cloe Poisson / CT Mirror

A Minnesota Death Resonates In Connecticut: ‘A Constant Message That Our Lives Don’t Matter’

Of all the agonizing final moments of George Floyd’s life, as he gasped for air from beneath a police officer’s knee, the most painful for Barbara Sands was when he called for his mother. It reminded her of her son Kyron , who police killed in Windham in February 2019 following a car chase and a shootout. “I wonder, did my son cry out for me?” Sands asked.

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Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

U.S. Government Won't Recognize Connecticut Transgender Athletes' Right To Compete As Females

The federal government has sided with a group of Connecticut athletes who have sued the state’s governing body of high school sports over the inclusion of transgender athletes in girls events.

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Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

The outcry in Minnesota over the killing of George Floyd as the result of an encounter with an overly aggressive police officer is just the latest of many examples of this country of people of color dying at the hands of law enforcement. 

Cloe Poisson / CT Mirror

Of all the agonizing final moments of George Floyd’s life, as he gasped for air from beneath a police officer’s knee, the most painful for Barbara Sands was when he called for his mother. It reminded her of her son Kyron, who police killed in Windham in February 2019 following a car chase and a shootout.

“I wonder, did my son cry out for me?” Sands asked.

coronavirus, Weaver, High Schools
Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

We’ve heard a lot about the distance learning going on at K-12 schools during t.his coronavirus pandemic shutdown. But there’s a good number of kids who are not distance learning for a variety of reasons and badly need schools to reopen. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Hospitalizations due to the COVID-19 pandemic experienced the largest one day drop to date, Gov. Ned Lamont said Friday. Meanwhile, state colleges and universities said they’re planning to have students back on campus this fall.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

Joe Biden, the presumptive Democratic nominee for president, described the killing of George Floyd, a black man who died after police pinned his neck to the ground for several minutes, as an "act of brutality."

"Once again — the words 'I can't breathe.' An act of brutality so elemental, it did more than deny one more black man in America his civil rights and his human rights. It denied his very humanity. It denied him of his life," Biden said Friday.

Updated at 6 p.m. ET

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has removed guidance on its website that houses of worship should limit choir activities — advice that was based on evidence that group singing can spread the coronavirus that causes COVID-19.

The warning was part of new guidance for leaders of faith-based organizations that the CDC had posted last Friday. It stated that they should:

Nancy Wyman Is Stepping Down As State Democratic Chair

15 hours ago
FILE PHOTO: Former Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman (right) announced Friday she is stepping down on June 10 as the Democratic state chair.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Former Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman announced Friday she is stepping down on June 10 as the Democratic state chair, a position she took at the request of Gov. Ned Lamont after his election in 2018. She will swap jobs with Nancy DiNardo, a former state chair and current member of the Democratic National Committee. 

Updated at 10:56 p.m. ET

Derek Chauvin, a former Minneapolis police officer involved in George Floyd's death on Monday, has been charged with third-degree murder and manslaughter.

Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman announced the charges Friday, shortly after Chauvin was taken into custody by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension.

The announcement comes days after the release of a video that shows Chauvin's knee pressed firmly on the black man's neck for at least seven minutes.

Before Philadelphia shut down to slow the spread of the coronavirus, Ed had a routine: most mornings he would head to a nearby McDonald's to brush his teeth, wash his face and — when he had the money — buy a cup of coffee. He would bounce between homeless shelters and try to get a shower. But since businesses closed and many shelters stopped taking new admissions, Ed has been mostly shut off from that routine.

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The Sharon Health Care Center
Courtesy: Athena Health Care Systems

As Covid-Positive Nursing Homes Launch, Connecticut Workers Say They Need More Support

New state data shows that COVID-19 is present in more than half of the state’s nursing homes and long-term care facilities, some of which are experiencing higher rates of infection and death than others. Despite early prevention protocols of hand washing, hygiene, symptom screenings, and visitor restrictions, 375 residents have died after contracting the virus – nearly 40% of all state deaths from the disease outbreak.

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The Coronavirus Crisis

Daily Coronavirus Updates

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Hospitalizations due to the COVID-19 pandemic experienced the largest one day drop to date, Gov. Ned Lamont said Friday. Meanwhile, state colleges and universities said they’re planning to have students back on campus this fall.

This is the ninth and final episode of US in the Time of Coronavirus.

We’ve surpassed 100,000 deaths in our country, and more than 3,826 deaths here in Connecticut as of Friday, May 20th. These numbers aren’t just numbers. They’re mothers, daughters, sisters, fathers, brothers and sons; Grandmas and grandpas, and best friends.

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