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Diners on the patio of Mondo’s in Middletown on May 20, the first day restaurants were allowed to open for outdoor dining.
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Lamont Easing COVID Restrictions: 'We've Earned The Right'

Connecticut will move to a third phase of easing COVID-19 restrictions on Oct. 8, permitting theaters and concert halls to reopen on a limited basis and increasing the indoor capacity of restaurants and event venues as the New England weather turns crisp.

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Brenda Leon / Connecticut Public Radio

Hartford Public Schools Announce On-Site Testing for Students, Staff And Families

After an uptick in positive COVID-19 cases, Hartford Public Schools announced they will provide coronavirus testing for students and staff. School nurses have been trained to administer the tests to symptomatic students and will work in partnership with Hartford HealthCare and Trinity Health of New England.

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Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Connecticut’s ban on utility shut-offs during the COVID-19 pandemic will expire at the end of the month, but state regulators said Wednesday utility companies haven’t done enough to educate customers about alternative payment programs. 

Updated at 1:47 p.m. ET

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg lay in state Friday at the U.S. Capitol, the first woman and the first Jewish person to be given that honor in the nation's history.

Back in early April as the COVID-19 pandemic ravaged New York, John J. Lennon was sure he would contract the coronavirus.

As a prisoner at Sing Sing Correctional Facility in Ossining, N.Y., social distancing was impossible, he says. Making calls on prison phones, Lennon says, meant being "chest to shoulders" with nearly two dozen inmates. "It was a death-trap situation to use the phone," he says.

Among the many things that have been radically changed by the coronavirus pandemic is the airline industry. Air travel demand is down a whopping 70% from last year, according to the industry group Airlines for America, and now the clock is ticking for tens of thousands of pilots, flight attendants, reservation agents and other airline employees, who will likely lose their jobs on Oct. 1, if Congress doesn't extend federal aid for the airlines.

Protestors block the traffic on Chapel Street in New Haven. The demonstration was gathered a day after a grand jury in Kentucky indicted one police officer involved in the raid that left Breonna Taylor dead.
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

Protesters gathered in New Haven Thursday night, blocking traffic and demonstrating in response to the charges in the fatal Louisville police shooting of Breonna Taylor.

Lamont Easing COVID Restrictions: 'We've Earned The Right'

Sep 24, 2020
Diners on the patio of Mondo’s in Middletown on May 20, the first day restaurants were allowed to open for outdoor dining.
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Connecticut will move to a third phase of easing COVID-19 restrictions on Oct. 8, permitting theaters and concert halls to reopen on a limited basis and increasing the indoor capacity of restaurants and event venues as the New England weather turns crisp.

Brenda Leon / Connecticut Public Radio

After an uptick in positive COVID-19 cases, Hartford Public Schools announced they will provide coronavirus testing for students and staff. School nurses have been trained to administer the tests to symptomatic students and will work in partnership with Hartford HealthCare and Trinity Health of New England. 

CT-N

The new leader of Connecticut’s largest business organization is now in his second month on the job. Chris DiPentima, CEO of the Connecticut Business and Industry Association, joined Connecticut Public Radio’s All Things Considered to talk about the tough act he has to follow, the current business climate statewide and his plans to make Connecticut businesses inclusive and equitable.

Courtesy: Darien Public Schools

Before what ended up being a 4 1/2-hour meeting Wednesday night, Darien teachers rallied outside the Board of Education building, urging the district to reconsider a proposal to bring all students back to full-time in-person learning on Tuesday.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Despite New England's progressive reputation, residential segregation still exists in communities throughout the region. 

In this second episode of a special radio series on "Racism In New England," we look at how housing laws and discrimination influence where we live — from the predominantly white states of northern New England to cities and suburbs in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

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More From Connecticut Public Radio

Heat lamps are up at Milestone in Redding for outdoor dining this fall
Ali Warshavsky / WNPR

As Fall Looms, Restaurant Owners' Concerns Grow

As the seasons begin to change and the weather gets colder, restaurant owners are urging Gov. Ned Lamont to expand indoor dining and provide broader guidelines for indoor events. Otherwise, some say they won’t survive.

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New Series

The Coronavirus Crisis

Daily Coronavirus Updates

Addiction affects people of all shapes and sizes. Skin tones and geographic locations. Ages, personalities, and genders. Today, meet two people who are committed to sobriety, and the Chief Clinical Officer at a treatment facility.

A sewer manhole
Kurt Kaiser / Wikimedia Commons

As Connecticut looks to keep COVID numbers low, some researchers have turned to studying poop -- as a tool to help public health officials.

This hour, we talk with scientists studying our waste. Can our collective toilet flushing give public health officials a head start on detecting coronavirus outbreaks?

We hear from Yale researchers who have been testing New Haven sewage to track COVID-19 cases since March. That work was recently published in the journal Nature Biotechnology.

We also hear from the mayor of Stamford about how wastewater data will shape that city’s public health response.

And we check in with Yale epidemiologist and Governor Lamont advisor Dr. Albert Ko. How should Connecticut prepare for a potential coronavirus surge this winter?

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