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Transportation Funding

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Toll Legislation Moves Forward In Connecticut State Legislature

Connecticut is one step closer to bringing tolls back to the state. The legislature's Transportation Committee voted in favor of moving forward three bills related to tolling, including Governor Ned Lamont's plan that would put tolls on interstates 91, 95 and 84, as well as portions of Route 15.

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Men are dying after opioid overdoses at nearly three times the rate of women in the United States. Overdose deaths are increasing faster among black and Latino Americans than among whites. And there's an especially steep rise in the number of young adults ages 25 to 34 whose death certificates include some version of the drug fentanyl.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

There could’ve been major work done by now on a building that’ll host a lot of people this weekend.

But, there’s no renovation on the books right now for the XL Center in Hartford, a 44-year-old, state-owned building officials have said is in desperate need of a makeover.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut is one step closer to bringing tolls back to the state. The legislature's Transportation Committee voted in favor of moving forward three bills related to tolling, including Governor Ned Lamont's plan that would put tolls on interstates 91, 95 and 84, as well as portions of Route 15. 

Nine days before Britain's scheduled departure from the European Union, European Council President Donald Tusk said Wednesday that an extension for withdrawal is possible – but only if U.K. parliament members approve Prime Minister Theresa May's terms.

The condition stands to push British parliamentarians to vote a third time on May's deal or prepare for a historic divorce without any deal at all.

President Trump continues to pile on criticism of the late Sen. John McCain, complaining on Wednesday during a speech in Ohio that the Arizona senator's family never thanked him for the Vietnam War hero's funeral, which involved large ceremonies in Washington, D.C.

"I gave him the kind of funeral that he wanted, which as president I had to approve," Trump told a crowd at an Army tank manufacturing plant in Lima. "I don't care about this. I didn't get [a] thank you. That's okay. We sent him on the way, but I wasn't a fan of John McCain."

The U.S. Supreme Court signaled strongly on Wednesday that it is likely to rule for a death row inmate in Mississippi who was prosecuted six times for the same crime by a prosecutor with a history of racial bias in jury selection.

The arguments, more passionate and fact-filled than usual, also had a surprise ending when Justice Clarence Thomas posed a question — the first time in three years.

Amid signs that special counsel Robert Mueller will soon complete his investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, President Trump says that he looks forward to seeing the report and that it should be made public.

Answering questions from reporters on the South Lawn of the White House prior to traveling to Ohio on Wednesday, Trump said of Mueller's report, "Let it come out. Let people see it — that's up to the attorney general."

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern returned to Christchurch for the second time since a gunman killed 50 people in an attack on two mosques last Friday.

Her first stop was at Cashmere High School, which lost two current students and one former student in last week's shooting, NPR's Rob Schmitz reported.

Susan Haigh / Associated Press

A federal judge moved this week to dismiss a lawsuit challenging Rhode Island’s truck-only tolling arrangement. The state’s legislature decided in 2016 to institute tolls, but just for trucks and only at certain spots on Interstate 95. Singling out trucks is a position that gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont also took while on the campaign trail -- only to reverse himself and back universal tolling after he was elected.

An ebullient Ella, with her sister Riley, outside the Old State House.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Ella Briggs, now 11, will never forget the day she got sent to the “naughty chair” in kindergarten for putting pants on her gingerbread person.

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Can Feces Save A Species? Boston Has The World's Largest Collection Of Right Whale Poop

The Marine Stress and Ocean Health Lab at the New England Aquarium looks like your typical laboratory. It’s full of humming and whirring machines, beakers and test tubes, digital scales and centrifuges. What sets it apart is the freezer. At negative 80 degrees Celsius, it houses the world’s largest collection of right whale poop. Yes, poop. It sounds gross, but scientists can learn a lot from feces reproductive and metabolic health, stress levels, exposure to infectious disease and biotoxins...

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Transportation

Susan Haigh / Associated Press

In Latest Turn, Federal Judges Dismisses Challenge To Rhode Island Truck Tolls

A federal judge moved this week to dismiss a lawsuit challenging Rhode Island’s truck-only tolling arrangement. The state’s legislature decided in 2016 to institute tolls, but just for trucks and only at certain spots on Interstate 95. Singling out trucks is a position that gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont also took while on the campaign trail -- only to reverse himself and back universal tolling after he was elected.

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'Fixed Odds' explores the impact of problem gambling on communities of color and the extent to which states provide money for problem gambling treatment.

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