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WNPR News sports coverage brings you a mix of local and statewide news from our reporters as well as national and global news from around the world from NPR.

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Seriously: a show about towels.

There's the history of towels, towels in Christianity, Terrible Towels, Towel Day.

Oh, and there are actual towels too.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Sports betting and other gaming-related bills are not likely to come out of this legislative session, according to Governor Ned Lamont.

Len Williams, a Hartford Athletic supporter, celebrates after the final whistle on Saturday May 4 when Athletic earned its first point of the season in a 1-1 tie vs. Charlotte in East Hartford.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Hartford’s new pro soccer team made its debut in front of a home crowd Saturday, May 4.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The time has finally come for Connecticut’s newest pro soccer team to debut in the Hartford area.

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Have you ever watched footage of Usain Bolt with a stupefied look on your face, wondering how one man could run... so fast? You're not alone.

This hour, we consider the science behind high-speed running with a researcher at Southern Methodist University.

We also check in with a couple of local runners, including Kiran Majmudar, who ran his first Hartford Marathon at... get this... age 65. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Hartford Yard Goats played their home opener Thursday night – the first game of the team’s peanut-free era. The Yard Goats are the first pro baseball team in the U.S. to ban peanuts and Cracker Jacks from the ballpark. 

One of the toughest jobs in Major League Baseball might belong to Donnie Gardiner.

He's the facilities superintendent at Fenway Park, the iconic 107-year-old home of the Boston Red Sox. It's the oldest ballpark in Major League Baseball, and Gardiner's job is to keep the place running.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This week, Will Leitch, from New York Magazine, wrote that "The Era of the Old Athlete is Over." Is it? And what does this mean for the future of sports?

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During his remarkable career with the Boston Red Sox, Ted Williams earned many nicknames: The Kid, The Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame... but the only nickname that he ever wanted was "the greatest hitter who ever lived."

An employee in the software development department of DraftKings, a daily fantasy sports company, walks past screens displaying the company's online system stats in Boston in September 2015.
Stephan Savoia / AP

Sports betting could soon be available at your fingertips.

Connecticut lawmakers could grant state residents the ability to gamble on their phones if they legalize sports betting.

Former WCCC-FM radio host "Sebastian" is now a handicapper, giving sports betting advice to customers. He was once arrested on illegal gambling charges.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

If you log onto some overseas website to bet on sports, or you do it through a bookie at the local bar, or even if you and your buddy have $20 riding on the Giants/Cowboys game, you’re betting illegally.

John Locher / AP Photo

Last year, the United States Supreme Court opened the door for states to make it legal to bet on sports. More recently, Connecticut lawmakers voted to send a bill that would legalize sports betting to the floor of the state legislature. But what could legalized sports betting look like here in the Land of Steady Habits? To answer that question, let's take a look first at neighboring Rhode Island, which debuted sports betting in November.

(AP Photo/Kathy Willens

March Madness starts TODAY with some of the best games coming to Hartford!

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Proposals that would expand gaming in Connecticut are on their way to the floor of the state legislature.

Lawmakers passed several bills Tuesday, ranging from legislation that would skirt federal approval to authorize the building of a casino in East Windsor, to blueprints for how sports betting could be adopted in the state.

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We're outraged that wealthy parents illegally paid to get their kids into elite colleges they would otherwise not qualify to enter. Despite evidence to the contrary, we still want to believe that America is a meritocracy. It's not. And believing that it is might be bad for you.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The city of Hartford is going back to a familiar strategy with the hope that local businesses can capitalize on March Madness.

Beginning March 21, the NCAA Tournament returns to Hartford for the first time since 1998.

Baishampayan Ghose / Flickr

The Connecticut Lottery wants to partner up with the state on sports betting.

Alan Light / Creative Commons

It was hard to watch the first part of Leaving Neverland, the documentary which aired on HBO aired on March 3. The poignancy of the mixed emotions expressed by two men and their mothers who fell under the spell of Michael Jackson and later, his predation, left me feeling like a fly on the wall of a particularly difficult visit to a therapist. I was forced to consider my own complicity in how we collectively create and reward a celebrity culture that allows us to suspend reality against our own better judgment.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The Hartford Yard Goats are taking ‘peanuts and Cracker Jacks’ out of the ballgame.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s new pro soccer team is in the middle of filling out its inaugural roster in advance of the team’s first preseason game.

Giphy.com

It's not a stretch to say the best part of Sunday's Super Bowl LIII was SpongeBob's short, but sweet, appearance during the halftime show. Should it be a surprise that the game was boring, the halftime show was bland, and the ads were forgettable? The long shadow of Colin Kaepernick cast a cloud over this game and the NFL has yet to deal with the fallout.

In a testament to the enduring power of Tom Brady and Bill Belichick, the New England Patriots emerged victorious in Super Bowl LIII for the team's sixth championship victory since 2002.

The Patriots defeated the Los Angeles Rams 13-3 in a slow-moving game with the lowest total score in Super Bowl history. That means the oldest quarterback-coach duo in Super Bowl history has defeated the youngest duo, Jared Goff and Sean McVay.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The long list of luminaries who have played the Super Bowl Halftime Show includes Michael Jackson, Prince, Beyoncé, Madonna, Paul McCartney, The Rolling Stones, The Who, U2, Tom Petty, Lady Gaga, Justin Timberlake, Bruce Springsteen... and as of Sunday: Maroon 5.

Whatever artist finally agreed to perform, it was going to be seen as controversial. Maroon 5 is defending their decision, even in the face of petitions asking them to drop out.

And: Alfonso Cuarón's Roma is nominated for 10 Academy Awards, including plenty of big ones -- Best Picture, Best Foreign Language Film, Best Director, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actress, Best Original Screenplay. Its 10 nominations tie it with Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon for the most ever by a foreign-language film. And this hour Roma becomes the 12th Oscar-nominated movie The Nose has covered.

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