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Higher education

Dancing In The Big City

Jul 12, 2012
Christopher Duggan

The dance ensemble, the Brian Brooks Moving Company returns to Wesleyan University for a pair of performances tonight and tomorrow night at Wesleyan's Center for the Arts Theater in Middletown. On the program is the New England premier of his new work Big City. The dance company has performed all of the world. Joining us by phone this morning is dancer and choreographer Brian Brooks. 

A host of new laws took effect in Connecticut on July 1st - among them, An Act Concerning Sexual Violence on College Campuses.

The law makes clear to all Connecticut’s colleges and universities – public and private –  what's expected in terms of sexual assault reporting procedures, disciplinary hearings, and prevention training for students and faculty.   

Anna Doroghazi of Connecticut Sexual Assault Crisis Services says many colleges are already in compliance.  

Title IX

Jun 25, 2012
Chion Wolf

Title IX is 40 years old this week...and slowly over that time, it’s meant a big boost in Women’s athletics.

Just to give you some idea - there are nearly 10 times as many high school girls playing organized sports today as there were the year the law went into effect. At the college level, nearly half of the athletic scholarships go to female athletes.

Connecticut College has the highest tuition in the nation among private, not-for-profit four-year colleges, according to data from the U.S. Department of Education. But experts say sometimes statistics can be misleading.  

The College Affordability and Transparency Center website is part of President Obama’s push to make the costs of higher education more transparent. Schools are ranked in several categories, including tuition sticker price, and net cost to families.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Jobs With Justice

Today's announcement by the Obama Administration that it will allow certain illegal immigrants to stay in the U.S. and have the ability to work without penalty is being embraced by undocumented students in Connecticut.

Death At College

May 17, 2012

As colleges around the region wrap up for the year, we turn our attention to a surprising and disturbing fact. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students. 

In April, a 19-year old Yale University freshman - Zachary Brunt of Alexandria, Virginia –  took his own life.  He was found dead in a physics lab. 

The following story is in two parts. We begin by hearing the voices of two friends of Zach’s. 

PART ONE

Before Alie Garry could enroll at Tunxis Community College, in Farmington, Conn., the 18-year old Simsbury resident had to take a required standardized test called, ominously, the “Accuplacer.” It told her what she might not have wanted to hear - that she needed remedial classes in math and English. But now, three years later, she is grateful for the Accuplacer.

A recent report by the US Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General finds inadequate enforcement of a federal law aimed at preventing alcohol and drug abuse on college campuses.   The review was requested by two state lawmakers on behalf of a Connecticut resident.

Dr. Suzanne Campbell

Fairfield University is participating in the nationwide initiative, Joining Forces, to to help veterans. WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil spoke with the Dean of the School Of Nursing, Dr Suzanne Campbell.

Unless Congress acts, interest rates on certain college loans are set to double this summer.  WNPR looks at what that would mean for Connecticut students.

More than 84 thousand college and university students in Connecticut had subsidized Stafford student loans last year.  Their interest rate was 3.4% thanks to the College Cost Reduction and Access Act which locked in a low rate for four years. 

Flickr Creative Commons, cbsawallich

We tend to see familiar patterns in the life around us. When a Trinity student was badly beaten on a street bordering the college, we saw violence coming from the neighborhood. When the Hartford police released a description of the suspects as white women and men in their twenties, many of us didn't let that alter our understanding of what had happened.

But in the four weeks since the assault, other versions of the story have trickled out across the campus and through the city.

Real Life Survival Guide Episode 40

Apr 1, 2012
Cindy Papish Gerber

Our friends at Sitar in New Haven were kind enough to keep their amazing buffet open a little later than usual on a recent Sunday afternoon, and the result was a rollicking editorial meeting for the RLSG!

We talked about April Fool's Day (of course!), college admissions - and meatballs - with guest editors Joanne Kahan, Kim Garley-Erb, Erika Horne and David Bailin.

Joanne Kahan describes herself as a “sometimes bored suburban housewife, volunteer, and retired mother”. (Which, translated, means she's an empty nester exploring new paths!)

Frog Hollow Riled By Assumptions On Trinity Attack

Mar 30, 2012
By Amherst2005 (www.creativecommons.org)

Almost a month after a Trinity College student was brutally attacked in the middle of the night just outside campus, it’s still not clear who his assailants were. College administrators have demanded better security in the surrounding neighborhood, frustrating nearby residents who say they’ve been unfairly blamed time and again. WNPR’s Neena Satija reports on their reactions.

Joe Courtney on Veterans and BRAC

Mar 14, 2012
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Thousands of troops are home from Iraq - and soon from Afghanistan - to a country that, in many ways, barely noticed they were gone. These wars have been fought at such a distance from a public that was told to “go shopping” to support a war effort, that we don’t have the impact of similar returns from Vietnam or World War 2.

Officials from UConn and the Board of Regents meet this week with legislators and advocates for victims of sexual assault to discuss a bill that would change the way college campuses respond to sexual violence.  

The federal Clery Act spells out how colleges and universities nationwide are expected to respond to sexual violence on campus. The Connecticut bill would make changes to the way schools hold internal disciplinary hearings, and would require prevention programming for students and faculty.

Sean MacEntee (Flickr Creative Commons)

The Yale Muslim Students Association was shocked to learn over the weekend that the New York Police Department spied on their organization in 2006 and 2007.

Real Life Survival Guide Episode 30

Jan 21, 2012
Cindy Papish Gerber

We gathered to record Episode 30 at Cafe Romeo, the hip, delicious East Rock coffee shop. We were joined by Anne Witkavitch, Kristin Huffman, and Mark Branch, and hosted by Chris Mordececai.

A Liberal Arts Education

Jan 17, 2012
NazarethCollege, Creative Commons

There has been a lot of talk recently about whether a Liberal Arts college degree is worth it. Some leading liberal arts schools are trying to make their case.

Diane Orson

Think college music program in Connecticut and the Hartt School of Music springs to mind. There’s the Yale School of Music and Wesleyan’s ethnomusicology program. Now, a report on the quiet transformation of Southern Connecticut State University’s Music Department – thanks to the generosity of a state resident.

SCSU student Andrew Pinto sings a song he composed. Pinto, a music theory major, says he’s benefited from free private singing lessons at Southern.  

A University of Connecticut professor has been studying two treatment therapies for post traumatic stress disorder. The study focuses on the military community which sees a disproportionate number of PTSD cases.

Studying The Chaos Theory

Dec 8, 2011
Gardener41, creative commons

Mark Demers is a Fairfield University Professor who just got a grant to study “chaos theory.” Could the gentle flap of a butterfly wing in China set off a tornado in Texas? He’ll study the evolution of systems that change over time and attempt to understand their stability and predictability.

Courtesy of Flickr Creative Commons Photo by No Division

It's been several months since a new law went into effect allowing illegal immigrants to pay the in state tuition rate at public colleges and universities in Connecticut.

As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, more than one hundred undocumented students have signed affadavits to qualify for the rate this semester.

Trishhhh, Flickr Creative Commons

Newsflash -- on this show Garrison Keillor threw cold water on his much-publicized earlier statements that he would retire from PHC in 2013.

You can hear him say, on the audio here: :"I’m starting to doubt that myself. I’ve been thinking about it, thinking: what else would I do? And I can’t come up with anything….If I didn’t do it I would wind up in a tiny walk-up apartment with a couple of cats."

Veterans who have served in the last decade are eligible for benefits under the Post 9-11 GI bill. As WNPRs Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, recent changes to the bill will help veterans pay for vocational training.

Under the current GI bill, veterans can get all or part of their college tuition paid for depending on years of military service. But not all veterans chose four-year schools.

There are several thousand veterans in the community college system in Connecticut. David Welsh is a Veterans Advisor at Tunxis Community College in Farmington.

Jeremy Pollack.

Recent college graduates are finding it difficult to get a job at a time when the national unemployment rate remains stagnant at nine percent. But imagine if you're a veteran just back from serving overseas. You're trying to find employment while carrying the physical and mental effects of war. A consortium of schools including the University of Connecticut are helping turn disabled veterans into small business-owners. As part of WNPR's Coming Home Project, Lucy Nalpathanchil introduces us to a entrepreneurship 'bootcamp'.

Flickr Creative Commons, 104Muttons

What are we watching when we watch (and cheer about) a college game?

Historian Taylor Branch disputes the notion that we are watching a logical, natural outgrowth of the college's academic identity. If you're a student, are those your fellow students playing football? If you're an alumnus, are those people on the basketball court extensions of what you used to be?

Photo / Jayel Aheram via Creative Commons

WANTED: Point Guard. $70K/yr. Must work weekends. Student-athletes generate billions of revenue for universities and private companies while they earn nothing. Some who’ve been badly hurt don’t get the care and coverage they’d get with workers comp. Others see their scholarship canceled after a year and find themselves on the hook for expensive tuition if they want to go further. Others object the the use of their images on licensed products long after their scholarship expire. Atlantic and Taylor Branch tackled this in a feature last week.

courtesy Plastic Forming Company

Small businesses everywhere are learning the lesson – adapt to technology or die. Consumers increasingly look for both marketing and retailing online and companies need to meet those expectations or lose sales. In the first of a series of reports on the rise of social media in marketing, WNPR’s Harriet Jones looks at how one manufacturer is facing up to the challenge.

Coutesy of Flickr CC by No Division

It’s an exciting time for college freshman as they begin classes this week. Among them are students who just a few months ago didn’t think they could afford college. That changed July 1 when a new state law went into effect, making illegal immigrants eligible for the in state tuition rate at Connecticut colleges and universities. WNPR’s Lucy Nalpathanchil introduces us to one of those students, an 18 year old named Karen.

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