Higher education | Connecticut Public Radio
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Higher education

Chion Wolf

In his State of the Union address, President Obama issued a challenge:

"To grow our middle class, our citizens must have access to the education and training that today’s jobs require. But we also have to make sure that America remains a place where everyone who’s willing to work hard has the chance to get ahead."

Goodwin College in East Hartford has become the first in the Northeast to offer a new manufacturing certification course. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

 

Goodwin College has more than 3,000 students, and according to its president, Mark Scheinberg, a simple mission.

“We differentiate ourselves insofar as we want to make sure that everything that students are getting will lead to some career when they finish.”

Goodwin Targets Manufacturing Training

Mar 29, 2013

Goodwin College in East Hartford has become the first in the Northeast to offer a new manufacturing certification course. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

 

Goodwin College has more than 3,000 students, and according to its president, Mark Scheinberg, a simple mission.

“We differentiate ourselves insofar as we want to make sure that everything that students are getting will lead to some career when they finish.”

SCSU President Mary Papazian

Mar 28, 2013
SCSU

It's an unusual time to be the president of a state university in Connecticut.

The Malloy administration has been trying to overhaul the system of state colleges and universities, the legislature is trying to reign in spending by the Board of Regents which oversees that system. A tuition increase is going into effect, which has drawn protests from students and even some faculty, who feel that the University of Connecticut is getting preferential treatment to the State Universities and Community colleges.

Yale University has introduced new workshops for students aimed at reducing sexual misconduct and improving the sexual climate on campus. Many sexual misconduct and prevention programs for college students center on decision-making and consent.

But if you’re at the point where there’s a question about consent, then you already have a communication problem, says Yale student Matt Breuer. He’s a Communication and Consent educator at the university. He says Yale’s workshops begin with conversation about sexual pressure.  

March Madness 2013

Mar 21, 2013
Netback Productions, Flickr Creative Commons

Every year, I say March Madness cannot get any more elaborate, and every year, I am wrong. This year, for example, the sports site Deadspin provides a meta-bracket, which allows you to click on games and see the outcome predicted by Nate Silver, Barack Obama, and five actual basketball experts - And yes, I listed Nate Silver first intentionally.

Many service members join the military because they’re eligible for tuition assistance and the GI Bill. But service members are losing these educational benefits because of federal budget cuts.

Michael Sanzo signed up in 2004 as an Army infantryman. 

"I knew when I was 18, 19 years old that I wasn’t ready for college. I had no way to pay for it. So I made a decision. Cause I knew how important it was to have a degree."

A new report looks at the experiences of undocumented students at 28 Jesuit colleges and universities in the US.  The study calls on institutions of higher education to improve policies that affect undocumented students.

Of the 65,000 undocumented students who graduate from high school each year, only about 5 to 10% go on to higher education. A new report finds inconsistency in the way colleges and universities manage undocumented students.

As families struggle to keep up with skyrocketing higher education costs, the Obama Administration has unveiled a new website, which shows what most families end up paying for college: school-by-school.  

In his State of the Union address, President Obama announced the release of the new College Scorecard, "... that parents and students can use to compare schools based on a simple criteria – where you can get the most bang for your educational buck."

Connecticut’s colleges and universities have taken important steps to address and prevent sexual violence on campus. That’s according to the 2012 Campus Report Card. But there’s still work to be done to improve sexual assault training and education.

The prevalence of sexual violence on college campuses nationwide is staggering. Research shows that up to one in four women experience unwanted sexual intercourse during college, and one in twelve men admit to acts that meet the legal definition of rape. 

(I)NTERVIEW - Steve Perry

Dec 19, 2012
Frank Wallace

“I'm unapologetic for our success because I know at the root of our success is a deep love for children. We come to win at everything we do. you can get on our team or you can be on the other team, I prefer winning, I'll stay with us.” These words, were spoken by educator Dr. Steve Perry in this exclusive CPBN Media Lab (I)NTERVIEW.

UConn Athletics In A Shifting Environment

Dec 19, 2012
Chion Wolf

The tragedy in Newtown has consumed our lives for the last several days. We’ll continue to have that conversation - as Connecticut attempts to heal. But today, we welcome in two guests to talk about something that many people in our state turn to as a relief - a respite - and a place to gather: Sports.

The University of Connecticut has been built into a top academic and research institution - but nobody will deny that its national prominence is fueled in large part by its successful sports programs.

Gateway Community College has created the state’s first Patient Navigator Program.  Students are trained to help people get the health care they need.

There’s a growing demand for Patient Navigators, says Vicki Bozzuto, dean of workforce development at Gateway Community College in New Haven.   "You might find a Patient Navigator in an emergency room, you might find them in a homeless shelter, you might find them on a street or in a doctor’s office."

Youth Vote: It's Debatable

Oct 23, 2012
Mark Yaworowski

New Britain, CT - President Barack Obama and Republican candidate Mitt Romney met on October 3rd for the first of their three debates. The CPBN Media Lab Interns went out to Central Connecticut State University the next day to speak with students about the debate.

The Embattled Board of Regents

Oct 12, 2012
Chion Wolf

It’s high drama this past week at the state Board of Regents for Higher Education. President Robert Kennedy is being pressured to step down after he mistakenly authorized twenty-one executive pay raises without board approval, and he also took a leave this summer for “professional development” -- that he spent at his home in Minnesota. We’ll get to the bottom of it all with Connecticut Mirror reporter Jacqueline Rabe Thomas and state Senator Beth Bye. 

** UPDATE: Robert Kennedy resigned Friday morning.

Quinnipiac University received approval from the State Board of Education Wednesday to award a medical degree. Sixty students are expected to begin classes at Quinnipiac’s medical school next August.

The Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine will become Connecticut’s third medical school. 

Dr. Bruce Koeppen is founding dean.  

Harriet Jones

U.S. Labor Secretary Hilda Solis was in Connecticut Friday, bringing a two-fold message to the state’s community colleges. She promoted the $12 million the administration has invested in new programs here, but as a prominent Latina, she also spoke about the importance of training the Latino workforce. 

The Cost of Higher Education

Sep 20, 2012
6SN7

President Obama has made it part of his regular education speech that the best path to the middle-class is through a college education.

And the numbers bear it out. Getting a college degree brings higher earnings over a lifetime. Today, those with a bachelor’s degree earned 84% more money over a lifetime than those with a high school diploma.

Photo by Chion Wolf

Congressman Joe Courtney has sponsored a bill that could help veterans who are in school or planning to enroll using the Post 9-11 GI bill. The legislation would change how education funding is classified from the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs.

Dancing In The Big City

Jul 12, 2012
Christopher Duggan

The dance ensemble, the Brian Brooks Moving Company returns to Wesleyan University for a pair of performances tonight and tomorrow night at Wesleyan's Center for the Arts Theater in Middletown. On the program is the New England premier of his new work Big City. The dance company has performed all of the world. Joining us by phone this morning is dancer and choreographer Brian Brooks. 

A host of new laws took effect in Connecticut on July 1st - among them, An Act Concerning Sexual Violence on College Campuses.

The law makes clear to all Connecticut’s colleges and universities – public and private –  what's expected in terms of sexual assault reporting procedures, disciplinary hearings, and prevention training for students and faculty.   

Anna Doroghazi of Connecticut Sexual Assault Crisis Services says many colleges are already in compliance.  

Title IX

Jun 25, 2012
Chion Wolf

Title IX is 40 years old this week...and slowly over that time, it’s meant a big boost in Women’s athletics.

Just to give you some idea - there are nearly 10 times as many high school girls playing organized sports today as there were the year the law went into effect. At the college level, nearly half of the athletic scholarships go to female athletes.

Connecticut College has the highest tuition in the nation among private, not-for-profit four-year colleges, according to data from the U.S. Department of Education. But experts say sometimes statistics can be misleading.  

The College Affordability and Transparency Center website is part of President Obama’s push to make the costs of higher education more transparent. Schools are ranked in several categories, including tuition sticker price, and net cost to families.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Jobs With Justice

Today's announcement by the Obama Administration that it will allow certain illegal immigrants to stay in the U.S. and have the ability to work without penalty is being embraced by undocumented students in Connecticut.

Death At College

May 17, 2012

As colleges around the region wrap up for the year, we turn our attention to a surprising and disturbing fact. Suicide is the second leading cause of death among college students. 

In April, a 19-year old Yale University freshman - Zachary Brunt of Alexandria, Virginia –  took his own life.  He was found dead in a physics lab. 

The following story is in two parts. We begin by hearing the voices of two friends of Zach’s. 

PART ONE

Before Alie Garry could enroll at Tunxis Community College, in Farmington, Conn., the 18-year old Simsbury resident had to take a required standardized test called, ominously, the “Accuplacer.” It told her what she might not have wanted to hear - that she needed remedial classes in math and English. But now, three years later, she is grateful for the Accuplacer.

A recent report by the US Department of Education’s Office of Inspector General finds inadequate enforcement of a federal law aimed at preventing alcohol and drug abuse on college campuses.   The review was requested by two state lawmakers on behalf of a Connecticut resident.

Dr. Suzanne Campbell

Fairfield University is participating in the nationwide initiative, Joining Forces, to to help veterans. WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil spoke with the Dean of the School Of Nursing, Dr Suzanne Campbell.

Unless Congress acts, interest rates on certain college loans are set to double this summer.  WNPR looks at what that would mean for Connecticut students.

More than 84 thousand college and university students in Connecticut had subsidized Stafford student loans last year.  Their interest rate was 3.4% thanks to the College Cost Reduction and Access Act which locked in a low rate for four years. 

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