Affordable Care Act | Connecticut Public Radio
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Affordable Care Act

Connecticut, like other states, launched an online health exchange -- Access Health CT -- where residents can shop for and purchase health insurance. There could be new opportunities for the unemployed or uninsured to receive health insurance. Here, we gather our coverage of changes under the new federal law.

health care providers
Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut advocates for addiction treatment say proposed funding cuts to the federal Medicaid program would leave fewer resources for people with substance use disorders.

The proposed cuts are part of President Donald Trump’s federal budget plan, which was released earlier this month. It includes cuts to Medicaid, a program that provides health coverage for people in poverty, and the Affordable Care Act totaling about $1 trillion in the next decade. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A multi-state coalition of Democratic state attorney’s general and a governor are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in on a recent court decision on the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate in an effort to preserve the federal health care law. 

Courtesy of Access Health CT

A federal appeals court in New Orleans dealt another blow to the Affordable Care Act last week, saying the requirement under the law to have health insurance is unconstitutional. But the court sidestepped the question of whether the health law itself is invalid.

Access Health CT

Judges in the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans this week found that the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate -- the requirement that residents buy health insurance or pay a fine -- is unconstitutional.

But they held off from saying that the entire law is invalid, sending the case back to a lower court in Texas for more analysis into which parts of the federal law can continue without the individual mandate. 

COURTESY OF ACCESS HEALTH CT

Residents still looking to get health care insurance coverage for 2020 have 30 more days to select plans through Access Health CT, the state’s Affordable Care Act exchange.

Access Health CT officials announced Monday that they’ve extended the open enrollment period to Jan. 15 -- the original deadline passed on Sunday. Officials said the extension gives people more time to review plan changes or select new plans for next year. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Deborah Bigelow walked into the Lyceum Conference Center in Hartford on a recent Thursday night prepared with a stack of folders and documents.

She hoped that by the time she left the Access Health Connecticut enrollment fair after speaking with a specialist, her health insurance plan for 2020 would be set, because not having coverage wasn’t an option.

Open Enrollment Has Begun: Here's What You Need To Know

Nov 1, 2019
Courtesy of Access Health CT

Open enrollment for 2020 health plans on Connecticut’s insurance exchange is now underway. It’s the seventh enrollment period for the state’s marketplace, and despite a recent drop in the number of uninsured people, health officials are still trying to reach the nearly 187,000 residents who lack coverage.

Ted Eytan / Creative Commons

Ten years ago around this time, U.S. legislators were in the middle of hashing out one of the biggest ever pieces of health care reform legislation. Democrats narrowly passed it, and President Barack Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in March of 2010.

Looking back on the last decade, Timothy Stoltzfus Jost, health policy expert and professor emeritus at Washington and Lee University, said the ACA has accomplished a lot, but it’s also left a fragmented health system divided by private and public sectors.

SLAWOMIR FAJER / ISTOCK / THINKSTOCK

Open enrollment for health insurance plans on Access Health CT — the state’s Affordable Care Act exchange — begins in November, but before that happens, the state Insurance Department needs to approve new premium prices.

Anthem and ConnectiCare are both seeking increases, and insurance representatives answered to state officials at a public information hearing Wednesday on the reasons why.

Pexels / Creative Commons

From surprise bills to sky-high deductibles, the American health care system is not working perfectly for many. But what’s the fix?

This hour: Democratic presidential candidates have a wide variety of ideas to reform how Americans are insured, from a “public option” to “Medicare for All”. But what do these terms mean? We break it down.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Marion Bradley always knew that getting breast cancer was a possibility. After all, she had a family history of the disease, so she wasn’t shocked when she was diagnosed with an early stage of the cancer about five years ago.

But that didn’t make it any less scary.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As oral arguments were being heard Tuesday by the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in Louisiana in a multi-state lawsuit that seeks to invalidate the Affordable Care Act, Connecticut senators at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., were making the case as to why Americans need the federal health care law.

Sen. Chris Murphy said eliminating the ACA without any replacement plan in place would result in a “humanitarian catastrophe.”

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

State lawmakers revealed details Thursday on how Connecticut could create and run its own public option health care plan, which would compete with private insurers.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Brianne Foley didn’t have time to plan for the birth of her first child. So when she and her husband were having their second child, Foley did extensive research on which ones accepted Medicaid and were within driving distance of her home in Watertown.

That’s when she found a practice run by certified nurse midwives.

Access Health CT

The federal health care law was known as Obamacare. And Republicans, including President Trump, campaigned on repealing it.  

Jim Wadleigh, former CEO of Access Health CT.
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The former CEO of the state’s health care exchange has resigned from his new private sector job, just weeks after taking it. Jim Wadleigh now says his move may have contravened state ethics laws.

UW Health / Creative Commons

The rate of people without health insurance in rural Connecticut has gone down dramatically since the passage of the Affordable Care Act.

That’s the takeaway message from a new report on health insurance out of Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families. Edwin Park, a research professor at the center, said the key to the drop is the state’s expansion of Medicaid to include more people.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

On Monday, President Trump is expected announce his choice to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Late last week, the Department of Justice announced it would not defend the Affordable Care Act in a lawsuit filed by 20 conservative state attorneys general.

Takk / Wikimedia Commons

The Affordable Care Act’s protection for people with preexisting conditions is one of the most important provisions in the law. But that may be in jeopardy after a decision by the Department of Justice to not defend the ACA in a lawsuit filed by 20 states.

iStock

The Affordable Care Act required Americans to carry some form of health insurance. But the new federal tax bill will eliminate what’s called an “individual mandate” for the 2019 tax year.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Open enrollment on the state’s health care exchange, Access Health Connecticut, ends Friday at midnight. 

Access Health CT

Open enrollment on the federal website Healthcare.gov will end this week. But if you’re looking for a plan on Connecticut’s exchange you have a little longer - until December 22nd. And Access Health CT has been using some novel methods to get the word out about health care coverage. 

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