voting | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

voting

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Even in a deep blue state like Connecticut, Saturday’s announcement of Joe Biden’s win in the U.S. presidential election was met with a mixture of caution, elation, disappointment and disapproval.

Two opposing camps of people outside the Capitol building in Hartford made that well known as they shouted at each other from opposite sides of Capitol Avenue -- President Donald Trump supporters in front of the gold-domed building and Biden supporters in front of the state Supreme Court. 

Biden Scores Win Over Trump In CT; Towns Counting Votes

Nov 3, 2020
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Connecticut voters backed Democrat Joe Biden by a wide margin over President Donald Trump on Tuesday, casting absentee ballots in unprecedented numbers along the way.

The Associated Press called the race shortly after the polls closed at 8 p.m. for Biden, who will receive Connecticut’s seven electoral votes.

Brad Greenlee / Creative Commons

The Colin McEnroe Show has an Election Day tradition of celebrating voters by inviting "citizen observers" from around the state to share their experience with voting. An ongoing pandemic and tensions stemming from a deeply divided electorate make this a year like no other.

Across Connecticut, No Problems At The Polls

Nov 3, 2020
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

This post has been updated.

Fears of violence and disruptions at polling places failed to materialize in Connecticut — and most of the nation — on Tuesday as residents went peacefully to the polls.

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET

You're probably anxious about the results, but patience may truly be a virtue on election night.

"I voted" sticker at a polling place
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut is a safe blue state in national elections, yet in 2016, a significant number of residents supported Donald Trump.  And some of them plan to vote for him again.

Carol Hollander, left, fills out an application for an absentee ballot for her neighbor and friend, Gertrude Lerman, right. Lerman is 104 years old and made it to the New Haven Hall of Records Saturday so she could cast her ballot.
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

The window of opportunity to apply for an absentee ballot has come and gone in most towns. But some municipalities are allowing voters to come by town hall to get everything done at once. And in an effort to limit risk of the coronavirus, New Haven voters could brave the weather Saturday and apply for and cast their absentee ballots outdoors. 

Members of a Quaker congregation in Maryland are so concerned that President Trump will prematurely declare victory when states are still counting ballots — a process that could take days — that they are ready to take to the streets in nonviolent resistance.

They say such a scenario would amount to a "coup" — even if it involves legal fights and not military action.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

People detained in jails pretrial or those serving a sentence for a misdemeanor offense are eligible to vote in Connecticut. Yet, out of the more than 3,000 eligible inmates, most are not expected to have their votes counted in the upcoming election. 

Updated 10:52 p.m. ET

The Supreme Court, in a 5-3 vote, has reaffirmed a lower court's block on Wisconsin's plan that would have allowed ballots in the state to arrive up to six days after Election Day. Democrats and progressive groups asked the justices to intervene after a federal appeals court blocked the ballot-receipt plan.

Republicans argue that the deadline extension threatens the integrity of the election by changing the rules too close to the election, an argument they have made in similar cases.

Flickr

In 2016, polls in key states underestimated the chances of a Donald Trump victory. This hour, how have pollsters changed the way they measure public opinion? Can we still rely on election polling? 

The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday that election officials in Pennsylvania can count absentee ballots received as late as the Friday after Election Day so long as they are postmarked by Nov. 3.

The court declined without comment to take up one of the highest-profile election law cases in the final stretch before Election Day. Pennsylvania Republicans had sought to block the counting of late-arriving ballots, which the state's Supreme Court had approved last month.

Creative Commons Zero - CC0

Every day, Where We Live, we say we want to hear from you. This hour, we really, really do. Next month's election is expected to break voter turnout records with a high number of absentee ballots.

Coming up, residents across the state join us to talk about what’s motivating them to cast their ballot.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Connecticut’s secretary of the state is serving notice to anyone planning to hassle voters at the polls in the upcoming general election.

Residents register to vote and fill out the Census at Hartford Public Library's Park Street branch during an outdoor outreach event.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Pablo Liriano is an 85-year-old urban gardener who is voting for the first time in November’s election. After waiting more than a decade, he got his citizenship in 2018, and he then registered to vote at Hartford's Park Street Library in the heart of the city’s Latino community. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Krystal Webb recently visited a “State of Connecticut Official Ballot Drop Box” outside Bloomfield Town Hall. Webb is voting absentee for the first time this year.

Absentee ballot packets include an inner envelope, outer mailing envelope, a mailing label and barcode. The barcode on the inner envelope acts as a form of voter identification.
Connecticut Public Radio

Lyda Ruijter is living in a world of envelopes. She’s the town clerk in Stamford, and she wants voters to know how important those envelopes are to their absentee ballots.

“Many people think of the absentee balloting process: ‘It's just an envelope and you put a stamp on it and then you put the ballot in it.’ But the tracking is the hard part and the complex part.”

Whoisjohngalt / Wikimedia Commons

After the first presidential debate last week, Americans have a lot of questions about absentee ballots and how to make sure their vote is counted. 

This hour, Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill joins us to answer our questions and yours.

Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill says President Donald Trump’s call to “watch the polls” could lead to voter intimidation.

Farewells And Bipartisan Votes In A Special House Session

Oct 1, 2020
House Speaker Joe Aresimowicz presiding over what was likely his last session day as speaker.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

Partisanship took a holiday Wednesday as the House of Representatives confirmed judicial nominations, passed bills and bid farewell to leaders of both parties in its last scheduled meeting before a new legislature takes office in January.

CT Delegates Give 'Spicy,' Unanimous Vote For Trump At GOP Convention

Aug 24, 2020

Leora Levy, a businesswoman from Greenwich and a top fundraiser for the state GOP, on Monday announced all Connecticut delegates to the National Republican Convention cast their votes for President Donald Trump.

Cindy Shebley / Creative Commons

The FDA on Saturday authorized emergency use of a rapid and inexpensive saliva test that could increase testing capacity. It’s quick, less expensive, and doesn't need the chemical reagents that are in short supply.

Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

Voters go to the polls today in an unusual election year. With over 300,000 absentee ballots requested for the primary elections, much of the voting has -- or should have -- already happened. But between delayed ballot mailing and postal service disruptions from Tropical Storm Isaias, many voters received their ballots late.

A ballot drop box outside of Woodbridge Town Hall.
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

There’s a primary next week. And though absentee balloting has been the talk, the question now is whether the power outages caused by Tropical Storm Isaias will affect in-person voting.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

With a presidential primary just a week away, municipal clerks are feeling the stress of absentee voting amid the pandemic. 

Courtesy: State of Connecticut

Secretary of the State Denise Merrill says that absentee ballots are mailed 21 days prior to a primary election. For this year’s Aug. 11 primary, that date was Tuesday, July 21. Now some voters have taken to social media to ask where their ballots are and when they can expect them to arrive.