UConn | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

UConn

A connection between violence and nightclub districts in New Haven has Mayor John DeStefano concerned. He wants to tighten some restrictions on nightclubs after a weekend homicide, and Governor Dannel Malloy is backing him up. Also, The Wheelhouse Digest wants to know from you: do you think we can work our way through local problems in our towns and cities without knowing personally the right person to do the job? Do we sometimes hide behind bureaucracy, or can it be a good shield? That and more below.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

As the University of Connecticut responds to a federal discrimination complaint, President Susan Herbst sent a letter to the school community about sexual assault and harassment on campus. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The University of Connecticut has been on the defensive since the announcement at the start of the week that seven women filed a federal discrimination complaint against the school. President Susan Herbst said, "The suggestion that the University of Connecticut, as an institution, would somehow be indifferent to or dismissive of any report of sexual assault is astonishingly misguided and demonstrably untrue." Governor Dannel Malloy and Republican leaders in the state have called for hearings into the way the school is handling complaints. That and more in The Wheelhouse Digest.

Melissa Bailey / New Haven Independent

The Wheelhouse Digest today is being very careful to avoid tweeting under any fake names, and in the meantime we're keen to learn the details of last night's mayoral debate in New Haven. Details about the Sandy Hook school shooting are slowly leaking out, but never officially. Read about that and more below.

Say No--Unite / Creative Commons

The University of Connecticut held a day-long conference on Violence Against Women on Tuesday. The gathering came just a day after seven women filed a federal discrimination complaint against the school, claiming they were victims of sexual assaults while students at UConn.

The Wheelhouse Takes On the Elm City

Oct 22, 2013
Versageek / Wikimedia Commons

We hit the road and took The Wheelhouse to New Haven. We’re joined by local reporters and news watchers to weigh in on this week's news, including analysis of the latest New Haven mayoral debate, the conviction of two East Haven police officers, sexual assault complaints at UConn, and the question: could New Haven make some of their roads run in both directions?

Luke Ford / Wikimedia Commons

It's a day for discussing where certain things fall on the range of just-a-bad-idea to downright criminal. The verdict is out in the East Haven trial of two police officers, Dennis Spaulding and David Cari, who were both found guilty of violating the civil rights of Latinos. Residents there appear divided in their response. In other news, seven women have filed a federal discrimination complaint against UConn, and Hartford's City Council wants a formal state investigation into Hybrid Insurance Group. More below in The Wheelhouse Digest.

University of Connecticut

Seven women who say they were victims of sexual assaults while students at the University of Connecticut have filed a federal discrimination complaint against the school. Their attorney, Gloria Allred, says the complaint to the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights alleges UConn failed to respond appropriately to the women's allegations. 

Coventry Regional Farmers' Market

Connecticut farmers say their business has been disrupted during the ongoing government shutdown. Bonnie Burr, assistant director for Cooperative Extension at the University of Connecticut, said farmers are frustrated by the closure of agencies run by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Burr works with communities around the state on economic development opportunities. 

Genghis Smith / Wikimedia Commons

By the looks of things, you, the Connecticut Taxpayer, will soon own a failing tennis tournament. You already own a really bad college football program, and you recently agreed to pay a man $750,000 to stop coaching it

A New Take on an Ancient Greek Play

Oct 9, 2013
Gerry Goodstein

In performance now through October 13 at the Connecticut Repertory Theatre at the University of Connecticut is "Big Love," a play by Charles Mee. "Big Love" is an adaptation of an ancient Greek play. Joining WNPR News to talk about the production is reporter Ed Wierzbicki, who reviewed the show here and also talked about playwright Mee, the challenge of this production, and the outline of the story. 

Gerry Goodstein

The past and present intersect in the plays of Charles Mee. Known for taking those hefty Greek tragedies and re-imagining them for today’s audiences, his works like "Big Love" ask us—no, challenge us--to give some serious personal thought to our social responsibility as citizens.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The national unemployment rate for veterans has improved in recent years, hovering around the civilian rate of seven percent. At the height of the recession, returning Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans were unemployed at nearly double the rate of non-veterans. A host of programs have been created to help former servicemembers support themselves after their military service ended. 

Uma Ramiah / WNPR

It's day three of the federal government shutdown. While lack of funding is having a major impact across the country and here in Connecticut, it's not the only financial reality getting new attention. UConn's affordability is under scrutiny today, and one school system in the state is struggling to stay open after suffering a massive theft under investigation. This is The Wheelhouse Digest.

The Wheelhouse Won't Shut Down

Oct 2, 2013
Kevin Burkett / Flickr Creative Commons

The federal government shutdown does not (directly) affect our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse. But it sure does give us something to talk about tomorrow. We'll be joined by Wheelhouse regulars to talk about this shutdown -- or, as Rep. David Schweikert called it on NPR's Morning Edition, a "government slowdown."

University of Connecticut

Paul Pasqualoni was fired earlier today as the University of Connecticut's head football coach. Offensive coordinator T.J. Weist will serve as the interim head coach for the rest of the season.

In may ways, the writing was on the wall for Pasqualoni. After two lackluster seasons, the Huskies are off to an 0-4 start, including a loss to division 1-AA Towson.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's the last day of September, so you know what that means: it's your last day to celebrate the full functioning of federal government, which may be partly out of commission by this time Wednesday. All the same, federal grants were just awarded to five Connecticut towns for law enforcement purposes. We'd hate to see those grants not come through, but these are strange times at The Wheelhouse Digest. That story and more on this federal holiday of sorts.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut is doing a little bit better getting ready for rainy days, we learned from Kevin Lembo this week, but when there's fair weather, the state legislature made sure we won't be generating energy from wind turbines anytime soon. Read about that and more in today's Wheelhouse Digest... where UConn has us thinking about the legality of digesting hemp brownies.

Tate George, forever linked to a buzzer-beater shot for UConn, is now on trial in Trenton, N.J., facing charges of running a $2 million Ponzi scheme that bilked many people -- including former UConn star Charlie Villanueva -- of "investment" money that instead went into George's pockets.

UConn

Most Americans don't like the new federal health care law that begins enrollment next week, according to a new national poll from the University of Connecticut. It's not that Americans don't want the government to help cover the uninsured. It's that they specifically don't like this law: the Affordable Care Act.

Heather Brandon

University of Connecticut President Susan Herbst is defending raises that were recently awarded to two dozen top school administrators. The pay hikes, which range from $10,000 to more than $25,000, have raised eyebrows. They come at a time when the state is struggling to balance its budget.

Herbst said administrators’ salaries need to be competitive in a national labor market. "We have a study of what these different positions--deans, vice presidents--make around the country," she said on WNPR's Where We Live, "and I stay within that range to make sure our salaries are normative. But I will tell you that I will only hire great people." 

Live from UConn: One-on-One with Susan Herbst

Sep 6, 2013
Jillian Ives

We’re at the Student Union on the Storrs campus as a new school year is underway, and the state’s flagship school is back in the news once again. They’re planning new facilities, like a $100-million recreation center for students, and they're preparing for an even bigger rebuild that will require a new flow of water onto campus.

There’s also a "flow" of money for top administrators at the school, as some students worry about what this means for the rising cost of college.

Exit Stage Right

Aug 30, 2013
Matias3000 (Flickr Creative Commons)

Hartford's Comcast Theatre seemed like an odd venue for the Oddball Comedy Tour.

Well, the night ended oddly enough when David Chappelle walked off after a few minutes. Unfortunately for him, audiences now obsess with recording everything (see this NSFW Louis CK bit), and there is lots of crummy cell-phone footage circulating from the performance.

Compared to some of the other stories in the world right now, this isn't a big deal. But it got us talking about something other than the VMAs.

UConn Named Greenest College

Aug 15, 2013
Lynn Gardner / Creative Commons

From slashing its water use by 15 percent to hundreds of classes that feature sustainability, UConn climbed from fifth-place to the top of this year's list of green colleges. "This year, our editorial focus was a little bit more on academic stuff that it usually is and UConn really, really was a standout in that realm," said Avital Andrews, lifestyle editor for Sierra Magazine, which has been ranking schools for seven years. 

The UConn Board of Trustees approved steps toward increasing its water supply and moving its West Hartford campus to downtown Hartford.

Water and Guns

Aug 6, 2013

Summer feels like it's winding down this week, what with cooler temperatures and earlier sunsets. That has us thinking about school, which of course makes us think about UConn students needing a lot of water. That and more in today's not-to-miss stories.

___________________________________________

UCONN'S WATER WILL COME FROM CONNECTICUT WATER CO.
Controversial plan dropped to draw from MDC supply.

Wanting to avoid "past development mistakes," Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra and City Council President Shawn Wooden wrote a shrewd letter to UConn President Susan Herbst.

Springfield voters have approved the MGM casino plan ...UConn is conducting an investigation into how the university handled allegations of sexual abuse by one of their professors...and last week, the Eastern League All-Star Game was held at New Britain Stadium and Governor Dannel Malloy received a less-than-warm welcome.

Turns out national political observers have their eyes on Malloy, too...he’s on a Washington Post list of “governors likely to lose their seats.”

Marco Arment (Flickr Creative Commons)

The University of Connecticut has come out with a new study on violent video games. It looked specifically at whether video games that pit players against human looking characters provokes more violent thoughts in the player than fighting non-human creatures.

When players fight human looking characters, "they're later more verbally aggressive and they have more aggressive thoughts," said Kirstie Farrar, who is an associate professor of communication and lead researcher of the study.

Marco Arment (Flickr Creative Commons)

The University of Connecticut has come out with a new study on violent video games. It looked specifically at whether video games that pit players against human looking characters provokes more violent thoughts in the player than fighting non-human creatures.

When players fight human looking characters, "they're later more verbally aggressive and they have more aggressive thoughts," said Kirstie Farrar, who is an associate professor of communication and lead researcher of the study.

Pages