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Christopher Albani was at home when he heard the call that a B-17 crashed at Bradley International Airport, killing seven people. He’s a firefighter, one of several who responded to the Oct. 2 crash. 

Albani was put on a hose line, dumping firefighting foam onto burning wreckage. 

“So in that moment, being exposed to it, guys were covered, head to toe, in the stuff,” Albani said.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Politicians and environmentalists met on the banks of the Farmington River Monday to call for more federal action to regulate a band of toxic chemicals. The call comes following two-high profile accidents at Bradley International Airport.

Citizen Scientists Steer Efforts To Jumpstart Black Rock Harbor's Recovery

Oct 7, 2019
Holly Turner, a teacher at the Bridgeport Regional Vocational Aquaculture School; Lyle Given, and Charlotte Hickey, both students. Kevin Blagys, a volunteer, observes their work.
Melanie Stengel / C-HIT.org

At 6:25 a.m. on the cloudy, humid first day of summer, two teenage aquaculture students huddle at the back of their school boat as it backs away from a dock in Black Rock Harbor in western Bridgeport.

Cost Of Modernizing Infrastructure Means Foul Spills At Black Rock Harbor Will Go On For Decades

Oct 4, 2019
On a dry day, the West Side plant handles about 18 million gallons of waste.  The waste circulates through three screening tanks where human feces, sanitary napkins, condoms and others items are screened out.
Melanie Stengel / C-HIT.org

On the west and east sides of narrow Black Rock Harbor in western Bridgeport, industry, school, recreation and sewage treatment converge.

Thawt Hawthje / Creative Commons

New England experienced fewer days with unhealthy air quality this year compared to last year, but Connecticut fared the worst in the six-state region, according to federal environmental officials.

Dead Fish, Condoms, Brown Foam: Sewage Has Chokehold On Black Rock Harbor

Oct 3, 2019
Hours after a heavy overnight rainstorm on July 12, a brown, foamy slick was floating in Black Rock Harbor near Captain's Cove Seaport. The West Side plant reported a legal bypass of more than 1 million gallons of disinfected partially treated raw sewage.
Melanie Stengel / C-HIT.org

On April 25, 2018, Patrick Clough walked onto a dock at Fayerweather Yacht Club on Black Rock Harbor in western Bridgeport. He looked down. Swirling around the dock was a brown, foamy slick. Women’s sanitary products and other objects floated in it.

Doc Searls / Flickr

An epoch of our own making is one way to describe it. And as the Anthropocene is set to be formally recognized as a chrono-stratigraphic unit in the next couple of years, scientists, philosophers, engineers and many more are exploring unconventional ways of adapting to this new era.

Santa Clara Weekly / Facebook

An accident earlier this summer at Bradley International Airport caused thousands of gallons of toxic chemicals to spill into the Farmington River. The aviation support company responsible for that accident was also involved in a similar incident in California in 2016.

In June, a faulty manual fire alarm in an airplane hangar at Bradley triggered the release of firefighting foam containing PFAS, a group of chemicals that are highly toxic, and hard to remove from the environment. An estimated 50,000 gallons of the foam eventually made its way into the Farmington River.

Connecticut Department of Energy and Enviromental Protection

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong says the state is working aggressively to deal with toxic chemicals known as PFAS in the Farmington River. In June, thousands of gallons of the chemicals were accidentally released into the Farmington near Bradley International airport.

On Thursday, Tong was joined by legislators and environmental officials at the banks of the Farmington River in Windsor near where the spill originated. He said before any action is taken, the state needs more information.

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

An accident at Bradley International Airport caused tens of thousands of gallons of firefighting foam to leak into the Farmington River in June. That foam contains PFAS, a group of chemicals linked to serious health risks. 

This hour, we take a look at how this accident happened, and what threats it poses to our health and environment. Here in Connecticut, some lawmakers are just learning about the risks of these “forever chemicals”.

New Hampshire is at the forefront of a growing debate over PFAS chemical contamination in drinking water. And many of the Democrats campaigning to win the state’s first-in-the-nation presidential primary are taking notice.

They’re using the issue to connect with a highly engaged block of potential Granite State voters – and local PFAS activists are welcoming the attention.


Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

Residents and state officials met in Windsor on Tuesday, following a chemical spill last month that sent thousands of gallons of contaminated water into the Farmington River.

Courtesy: CT Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

There’s increasing concern over a chemical spill into the Farmington River that happened earlier this month. An accident June 9 at Bradley Airport released 50,000 gallons of firefighting foam containing chemicals known as PFAS -- and a substantial amount of it made its way from the sewer system into the waterway. In the days since, it’s become evident that it’s going to be very hard to contain and remove the chemicals from the spill. 

A recent accidental dump of firefighting foam into the Farmington River near Bradley International Airport has conservationists concerned.

Trevor Lloyd-Evans certainly looks like a naturalist. On a walk through the woods in Plymouth, he sports a white beard, thick wool sweater and a pair of binoculars around his neck. The ornithologist with the Manomet Center‘s Landbird Conservation Program is demonstrating his calling, too, pointing out cardinals, blue jays and Carolina wrens and imitating their unique chirps.

Several members of a powerful science panel for the Environmental Protection Agency expressed doubt at a hearing Thursday about the long-established scientific consensus that air pollution can cause premature death.

The panel was meeting to consider recommendations that would fundamentally change how the agency analyzes the public health dangers posed by air pollution and could lead to weaker regulation of soot.

Pxhere

We all need fresh water to survive, yet it's so ubiquitous most of us barely spare it a thought in our daily lives. This hour we take a look at the state of water in our country, from rivers and streams to the water that comes out of our taps.

A.has / Flickr

Six states, including Connecticut, are suing the Trump administration over the “good neighbor” provision in the Clean Air Act.

James Vaughan / Flickr

Humans are great at making a mess of things. So far, however, that mess has been confined to Earth. But as we develop into a spacefaring species, our capacity for destruction, pollution, and prejudice (towards aliens of earthly and unearthly origins) threatens to have cosmic consequences.

How Much Plastic Is In Your Body? Scientists Turn To Oysters, Mussels For Clues

Dec 28, 2018
Stephen Urchick, 24, stuffs a handful of plastic bottles and six-pack rings into a garbage bag. Urchick volunteered to help clean Long Wharf as part of the Save the Sound program run by the Connecticut Fund for the Environment.
Carl Jordan Castro / C-HIT.org

J. Evan Ward knelt on a dock jutting into Eastern Point Bay at the eastern end of Long Island Sound and hauled up a floating cage containing oysters.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and General Electric Co. are funding a new approach to negotiating an agreement on the cleanup of the Housatonic River. Just last week, many of the stakeholders met with an independent mediator.

Streetwise Cycle / Wikimedia Commons

When you put your recycling into those big blue bins on the curb for garbage night, do you ever think about where all that trash goes?

Plastic trash is littering the land and fouling rivers and oceans. But what we can see is only a small fraction of what's out there.

Since modern plastic was first mass-produced, 8 billion tons have been manufactured. And when it's thrown away, it doesn't just disappear. Much of it crumbles into small pieces.

Upheavals in global markets will soon be felt in Vermonters’ pocketbooks. The international market for some recyclable material has crashed, and that has forced some municipalities and solid waste companies to start charging for recycling.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

State officials say they’ll fight a White House proposal to loosen pollution standards for new vehicles. Many leaders are fearful the Republican idea will put federal mandates ahead of state law.

U.S. Fuel Cell

A new report offers New England states a roadmap for creating a future transportation system that is cleaner and more accessible.

Trump Digs Coal, And GOP Candidates Skip Climate Forum

Jul 17, 2018
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

By skipping a forum on climate change Monday night, the five Republican candidates for governor saved themselves from two unpalatable options: Defending the Trump administration’s love affair with coal to furious environmentalists, or riling the GOP base a month before the primary by publicly breaking with the president.

James Vaughan / Flickr

Humans are great at making a mess of things. So far, however, that mess has been confined to Earth. But as we develop into a spacefaring species, our capacity for destruction, pollution, and prejudice (towards aliens of earthly and unearthly origins) threatens to have cosmic consequences.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen said he welcomes the resignation of Scott Pruitt, who headed up the federal Environmental Protection Agency.

vladdythephotogeek / Creative Commons

Officials in Connecticut and New York are praising a federal court decision, which says the Environmental Protection Agency needs to do more to control air pollution.

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