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pollution

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

An accident at Bradley International Airport caused tens of thousands of gallons of firefighting foam to leak into the Farmington River in June. That foam contains PFAS, a group of chemicals linked to serious health risks. 

This hour, we take a look at how this accident happened, and what threats it poses to our health and environment. Here in Connecticut, some lawmakers are just learning about the risks of these “forever chemicals”.

New Hampshire is at the forefront of a growing debate over PFAS chemical contamination in drinking water. And many of the Democrats campaigning to win the state’s first-in-the-nation presidential primary are taking notice.

They’re using the issue to connect with a highly engaged block of potential Granite State voters – and local PFAS activists are welcoming the attention.


Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

Residents and state officials met in Windsor on Tuesday, following a chemical spill last month that sent thousands of gallons of contaminated water into the Farmington River.

Courtesy: CT Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

There’s increasing concern over a chemical spill into the Farmington River that happened earlier this month. An accident June 9 at Bradley Airport released 50,000 gallons of firefighting foam containing chemicals known as PFAS -- and a substantial amount of it made its way from the sewer system into the waterway. In the days since, it’s become evident that it’s going to be very hard to contain and remove the chemicals from the spill. 

Firefighting foam that spilled into the Farmington River shown contained by a boom.
Courtesy: Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

A recent accidental dump of firefighting foam into the Farmington River near Bradley International Airport has conservationists concerned.

Trevor Lloyd-Evans certainly looks like a naturalist. On a walk through the woods in Plymouth, he sports a white beard, thick wool sweater and a pair of binoculars around his neck. The ornithologist with the Manomet Center‘s Landbird Conservation Program is demonstrating his calling, too, pointing out cardinals, blue jays and Carolina wrens and imitating their unique chirps.

Several members of a powerful science panel for the Environmental Protection Agency expressed doubt at a hearing Thursday about the long-established scientific consensus that air pollution can cause premature death.

The panel was meeting to consider recommendations that would fundamentally change how the agency analyzes the public health dangers posed by air pollution and could lead to weaker regulation of soot.

Pxhere

We all need fresh water to survive, yet it's so ubiquitous most of us barely spare it a thought in our daily lives. This hour we take a look at the state of water in our country, from rivers and streams to the water that comes out of our taps.

A.has / Flickr

Six states, including Connecticut, are suing the Trump administration over the “good neighbor” provision in the Clean Air Act.

James Vaughan / Flickr

Humans are great at making a mess of things. So far, however, that mess has been confined to Earth. But as we develop into a spacefaring species, our capacity for destruction, pollution, and prejudice (towards aliens of earthly and unearthly origins) threatens to have cosmic consequences.

How Much Plastic Is In Your Body? Scientists Turn To Oysters, Mussels For Clues

Dec 28, 2018
Stephen Urchick, 24, stuffs a handful of plastic bottles and six-pack rings into a garbage bag. Urchick volunteered to help clean Long Wharf as part of the Save the Sound program run by the Connecticut Fund for the Environment.
Carl Jordan Castro / C-HIT.org

J. Evan Ward knelt on a dock jutting into Eastern Point Bay at the eastern end of Long Island Sound and hauled up a floating cage containing oysters.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and General Electric Co. are funding a new approach to negotiating an agreement on the cleanup of the Housatonic River. Just last week, many of the stakeholders met with an independent mediator.

Streetwise Cycle / Wikimedia Commons

When you put your recycling into those big blue bins on the curb for garbage night, do you ever think about where all that trash goes?

Plastic trash is littering the land and fouling rivers and oceans. But what we can see is only a small fraction of what's out there.

Since modern plastic was first mass-produced, 8 billion tons have been manufactured. And when it's thrown away, it doesn't just disappear. Much of it crumbles into small pieces.

Upheavals in global markets will soon be felt in Vermonters’ pocketbooks. The international market for some recyclable material has crashed, and that has forced some municipalities and solid waste companies to start charging for recycling.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

State officials say they’ll fight a White House proposal to loosen pollution standards for new vehicles. Many leaders are fearful the Republican idea will put federal mandates ahead of state law.

U.S. Fuel Cell

A new report offers New England states a roadmap for creating a future transportation system that is cleaner and more accessible.

Trump Digs Coal, And GOP Candidates Skip Climate Forum

Jul 17, 2018
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

By skipping a forum on climate change Monday night, the five Republican candidates for governor saved themselves from two unpalatable options: Defending the Trump administration’s love affair with coal to furious environmentalists, or riling the GOP base a month before the primary by publicly breaking with the president.

James Vaughan / Flickr

Humans are great at making a mess of things. So far, however, that mess has been confined to Earth. But as we develop into a spacefaring species, our capacity for destruction, pollution, and prejudice (towards aliens of earthly and unearthly origins) threatens to have cosmic consequences.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Attorney General George Jepsen said he welcomes the resignation of Scott Pruitt, who headed up the federal Environmental Protection Agency.

vladdythephotogeek / Creative Commons

Officials in Connecticut and New York are praising a federal court decision, which says the Environmental Protection Agency needs to do more to control air pollution.

A draft water pollution permit for a regional wastewater treatment plant on the Connecticut River in Springfield, Massachusetts, is now back in the hands of the Environmental Protection Agency. 

Margo Fontaine / Creative Commons

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced more than $8 million in “brownfield” remediation grants, money that will fund assessments and cleanups of old industrial sites throughout New England.

"Starman" in Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster with Earth in the background
SpaceX / Flickr

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk made history in February when his Falcon Heavy rocket launched a red Tesla convertible into outer space. In the driver seat is a dummy astronaut dubbed “Starman” who’s now flying through space, orbiting the sun.

Pete Jelliffe / Creative Commons

The state’s latest budget crisis means tens of millions of dollars set aside to make homes and businesses more energy efficient will instead be pumped into the state’s general fund.

Jillian Ives

A day after a massive fire broke out at a Connecticut waste and recycling plant, the blaze has been declared under control.

Bert Kaufmann / Creative Commons

Tens of millions of dollars that were to be set aside to make homes and businesses more energy efficient will instead be pumped into the state’s general fund.

It’s a funding raid that’s been criticized as a “hidden tax” on utility bills.

Here’s what the changes mean for consumers -- and greenhouse gases.

The recent cold spell has spurred oil-fired power plants throughout New England into action. But the operator of the regional electricity grid says pollution control regulations could throttle supplies from those sources.

Over the last decade, relatively low-polluting natural gas has been New England’s dominant fuel for electricity generation. But in winter, demand for gas can skyrocket from consumers who need it to heat their homes, and that can limit supplies for electricity generation.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

An aging trash incinerator located on Hartford’s riverfront will continue to burn garbage in the coming years. But a new developer chosen by the state said it will work to drastically reduce the amount of waste incinerated at the state’s largest trash plant.

AGs Sue EPA To Enforce Smog Regulations

Dec 28, 2017

The attorneys general in eight Eastern seaboard states are suing the Trump administration’s Environmental Protection Agency over air pollution that blows in from upwind states.  

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