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Last week, while he was in Afghanistan, Congressman Chris Murphy saw a wanted poster for Osama Bin Laden in the special ops command center.

Now, that poster’s down - but Bin Laden’s death doesn’t clean up the messy history of US involvement in Afghanistan, or the rocky relationship between the US and Pakistan.  We’ve heard this week that top officials in that country didn’t know Bin Laden was hiding out so close to the capital...

Malloy Avoids Black Friday, Delays Layoffs

May 5, 2011
Library of Congress

Gov. Dannel P. Malloy has delayed the issuance of mass layoff notices planned for Friday, but a spokesman said today the change does not necessarily mean the administration is close to a deal for concessions and other labor savings.

"It's not a sign of a huge breakthrough. If it helps bring one, that would be welcome," said Roy Occhiogrosso, senior adviser to the governor.

Chion Wolf

I've been plowing through two biographies of Connecticut political titans -- Morgan Bulkeley who was Hartford mayor, Connecticut governor and a US Senator during the Gilded Age -- and Tom Dodd, Nuremberg prosecutor, Congressman, and a US Senator.

Towns and cities spend hundreds of thousands of dollars a year to print public notices in area newspapers. This week, a bill aimed at scaling back that mandate died in the state legislature. Newspaper publishers are happy, and local government advocates aren't.

The Art Of Negotiation

Apr 27, 2011
Chion Wolf

The governor negotiated a budget deal with democratic leaders, although he hadn’t finished negotiating labor concessions with state unions.

Meanwhile, negotiations have broken off in conflicts between the Israelis and Palestinians, and between Thailand and Cambodia - and former President Jimmy Carter, who’s negotiated many a deal, is talking to North Korea.

Maybe he needs to step in to the NFL labor dispute, where negotiations broke off a while back, and the future of the league seems to be in the hands of a judge.

Governor Dannel Malloy has written a letter to federal officials asking them to delay deporting a college student. As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the Governor's intervention stems from his support of immigration reform efforts that would allow college students to receive permanent legal status.

Mariano Cardoso is an illegal immigrant from Mexico who has lived in the U.S. for most of his life after his parents brought him here when he was a baby.

Convicted former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez is seeking what could amount to tens of thousands of dollars in back vacation and sick time.  But as WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports, there's a question as to whether Perez was at work or on vacation while he was on trial last year for corruption.

Flickr Creative Commons, familymwr

Just a few days ago, the First Two Ladies on the United States, Michelle Obama and Jill Biden announced a national initiative called Joining Forces. The idea is to combine as many elements of society as possible -- communities, individuals, nonprofits and businesses -- to make life a little less stressful for military families.

Segarra Presents Budget

Apr 18, 2011
Jeff Cohen/WNPR

Tax Day

Apr 18, 2011
Chion Wolf

When critics say the state shouldn’t increase taxes on the wealthy, they often say that it’ll force the rich to leave Connecticut.  So, is it true?

Two new studies show - well, that’s it’s not true at all.  That other factors, beyond the tax rate, are what drives people to make decisions about where to live.  

Immigration Day

Apr 13, 2011
Chion Wolf, WNPR

Today mark’s the state’s 14th Annual Immigrant Day

CtHouseDems via Flickr Creative Commons

Over the weekend, questions were raised about Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra’s ethics disclosures to the city and whether or not he may be in violation of federal housing requirements.  Now, as WNPR’s Jeff Cohen reports, it appears the people behind those questions were paid consultants to Segarra’s political opponent and former advisors of convicted Mayor Eddie Perez.

Chion Wolf Photo

Mayors and first selectmen from around the state  will gather at the Capitol Wednesday to urge legislators to not slash state aid to municipalities.

As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the lobby day coincidentally comes just after Governor Dannel Malloy unveiled a contingency plan that would target municipal aid if concessions from labor groups aren't met.

Chion Wolf

There’s a midnight deadline.  If a deal between lawmakers and the White House can’t be struck, the federal government shuts down.

And the next question is…does it matter?  We’re being assured that even in shut-down mode, our mail still gets delivered, entitlement benefits will still be paid, the military will keep fighting on three fronts. 

But other services you count on from the government are still kind of up in the air.  That expedited passport for the surprise Caribbean cruise?  The big tax refund you were planning on to pay for said cruise?

Government Shutdown Looming, Again

Apr 8, 2011

With a Midnight deadline looming, President Obama and congressional leaders are scrambling to finish a budget for the rest of the year, and avoid a government shutdown. Connecticut's congressional delegation is scrambling as well, in case the government goes into shut down mode. The Connecticut Mirror's Washington correspondent Deirdre Shesgreen has been checking in with Connecticut lawmakers and joins us.

Read Deirdre Shesgreen's Article in the CT Mirror

Jeff Cohen/WNPR

Connecticut's nonprofit service providers are trying to figure out how to improve their working relationship with the state in order to save money and enhance services.  Advocates for the state's non-profits gathered today/yesterday at the state capitol to talk about a recently released report that looks to answer this question: "How can we as a government smooth the path so that the non-profits can actually provide the services without having to worry so much about the bureaucracy and the red tape." That's Deb Heinrich.

John Ryan Recabar

Today we talk with Palestinian physician Dr. Izzeldin Abuelaish. In 2009 during Israel’s invasion and bombardment of Gaza, a rocket hit his house killing three of his daughters and his niece. Author of “I Shall Not Hate,” Abuelaish has devoted his life to reconciliation between Israelis and Palestinians.

Pete Souza / White House

Today, it's Politics, Burgers & Beer with Rich Hanley—town hall style! We take your calls for the full hour. What's on your mind? What're you worried about? What're you hopeful for? Call us—203 776-WNPR—live at 3pm!

So, these three Governors walk into a town hall meeting.  One’s a member of the tea party, one is Mario Cuomo’s kid, and the third guy’s wearing a green tie.

I think I’m telling this wrong. The joke’s also supposed to include something about a labor department mural in Maine, and the terms “shared sacrifice” and “transformational.” 

The new Governors across our region are all facing big budgetary challenges, and they’re handling them in very different ways.

GiantsFanatic / Creative Commons

Connecticut towns and cities are mandated by law to publish public notices in local newspapers.  But that could soon change.

Yesterday, the general Assembly's Judiciary Committee heard public testimony on a host of bills aimed at better protecting victims of domestic violence. Joining us by phone is State Representative Mae Flexer - she is a member of the legislature's Judiciary committee and chairwoman of the Speaker’s Task Force on Domestic Violence.

In Hartford, a state court judge has allowed a civil case over whether former Mayor Eddie Perez can collect his city pension…to continue. Attorney General George Jepsen said he's pleased with the decision. He says a judge could eventually consider whether Perez is entitled to a portion of his pension. "At some point, if the issue goes to trial, the issue of how much of Mayor Perez's pension should be revoked will be something the judge will consider." Perez was found guilty last year on corruption charges.

Courtesy Rick Hartford/Hartford Courant

Chion Wolf/WNPR

In Hartford, convicted former Mayor Eddie Perez is gone from city hall.  But he’s not gone from city politics.  As WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports, former Perez allies are questioning the judgment of current Mayor Pedro Segarra. Segarra says it’s kind of strange to be criticized by allies of the man who's going to prison. “To blame me for transactions that were done by the previous administration by members of the previous administration are a little bit incoherent.” Perez was found guilty of taking a bribe from a city contractor last year.

Campaign Finance

Mar 28, 2011

In just a few hours the US Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in an Arizona case that may affect Connecticut's public campaign finance system.  We talk to Deirdre Shesgreen of the Connecticut Mirror about her recent article.

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