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New Hampshire

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Here’s the story that New England tells itself: Racism is a Southern problem.

But our region’s abolitionist past hides a darker history of racism, slavery and segregation. It’s a legacy that lives with us today. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public/NENC

From suburban Connecticut to rural Maine, demonstrators occupied highways and town greens over the summer with banners and calls for racial justice. 

foxwoods casinos reopening coronavirus
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

Connecticut’s two casinos are taking paying customers for the first time in two months.

Tribal leadership shuttered the casinos March 18 for the first time in their history over fears of the spread of COVID-19.

The first positive test results for the coronavirus disease COVID-19 have been identified in New Hampshire, according to state health officials Monday morning.

The patient is an employee of Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center and recently returned from Italy. They presented mild symptoms and are currently on home isolation.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio / NENC

As New Hampshire voters pick their party's nominees, the NPR news team is providing live updates from the Granite State.

Families with children watch from the second floor as Sen. Elizabeth Warren speaks at the Manchester Canvass Kickoff with Elizabeth Warren at Manchester Community College on Feb. 8, 2020 in New Hampshire.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

The Democratic presidential candidates criss-crossed New Hampshire for a final push ahead of the Tuesday primary. Rallies were held from Concord to Manchester to Londonderry, where supporters waited in long lines to fill halls, gyms, arenas and schools to catch glimpses of -- or shake hands with -- the candidates.  Here are some of the moments that show what it was like on the ground in the Granite State.

Voting booth
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Presidential hopefuls have been flooding New Hampshire’s airwaves with ad buys ahead of Tuesday’s primaries. The Wesleyan Media Project in Middletown tracks political advertising in real time during elections. 

Co-director Erika Franklin Fowler spoke with Connecticut Public Radio’s Diane Orson for Morning Edition.

A controversial new residency law in New Hampshire is creating confusion, and has led to charges of voter suppression and a legal challenge.

Backers say the law clarifies the state’s voting rules and brings New Hampshire in line with all other states, but opponents say it is a blatant effort by Republicans to block college students who hail from other states from voting.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

 

Melissa Potter was standing in her kitchen when the call came in. It was her estranged nephew, Brandon Wagshol, and she was surprised — he’d never called her before.

“When I saw his name on the caller ID, I got worried that maybe something horrible had happened,” Potter said. “Or, you know, maybe something was going on with the family that he needed to tell me about. So I picked up the phone.”

Wild Churches Bring Religion Outside

Jul 12, 2019
James Napoli

It’s Sunday morning. The Reverend Stephen Blackmer is ringing two large handbells. He’s calling his congregation back from silent meditation. 

They gather to pray around the altar. It’s a small wooden table set on a sunny knoll beneath three white pine trees. On top of the table sits communion bread wrapped in foil, wine in a Nalgene bottle, and offerings of clover, mushrooms, and berries gathered from the surrounding forest. This is Church of the Woods.

For years, an elderly resident of Hanover, N.H., fed one particular female black bear. The old man's food offer of choice? Birdseed and maple-glazed doughnuts from a diner down the street.

Then the man died, and the bear started venturing out farther in search of more delicious treats.

She had become comfortable around humans, and people in town grew to love her — a lumbering, strong but gentle animal that would come right up to your door. She's named Mink, after a local natural area called Mink Brook.

New Hampshire is poised to become the 21st state to abolish the death penalty.

The state Senate voted 17-6 Thursday to end capital punishment, adding its voice to the state House which voted for repeal last month by a vote of 279-88. The bill changes the penalty for capital murder to a mandatory life sentence without the possibility of parole.

James Napoli

It’s late July in a tiny venue, in a small town, in Vermont. This is an odd space. The walls are lined with strange artifacts and curiosities, including a canning jar that holds Elvis’ gallstones. Or so the label says. It’s the type of place where outcasts and misfits feel right at home. Tonight’s performer is no exception. It’s Kelsie Hogue, a.k.a. Sir Babygirl. She’s wearing a backwards bubblegum pink ball cap and shiny silk robe. She cradles the mic close to her mouth. Her lips are painted cornflower blue—the same as her eye shadow.

This isn’t the type of performer you might expect to see in rural New England. But Hogue’s been here for the past year since she moved back in with her parents.

A decade after Sig Sauer inked a deal to sell up to $306 million worth of pistols to Colombia's National Police, company CEO Ron Cohen is facing jail time in Germany for making the sale.

German prosecutors accuse Cohen of colluding with Sig Sauer's sister company in Germany to violate that country's export rules. Under German law, companies are prohibited from exporting firearms or other weapons to countries in conflict. That includes Colombia, which is slowly emerging from a half-century of armed conflict.

High ranking members of the Colombian National Police found themselves in Exeter, N.H., in the spring of 2009. They were there to visit arms maker Sig Sauer, which had just secured a contract worth up to $306 million to provide Colombian law enforcement with nearly 100,000 pistols. 

Right now, a group of hydroelectric dams on the Connecticut River are undergoing a once-in-a-generation process – a federal relicensing. NHPR’s Annie Ropeik went to the dams and talked with people who live, work and play nearby about what they hope might change.  

Details of a criminal investigation into three professors at Dartmouth College remain unclear. The New Hampshire Attorney General's Office announced the investigation Tuesday after learning from Dartmouth that there had been allegations of sexual misconduct by the professors. The college had announced its own internal investigations last week, but didn't offer details of any allegations.

A fact-finding hearing by President Trump's commission looking into voter fraud exposed self-inflicted rifts among its members during the panel's second meeting Tuesday in Manchester, N.H.

Days earlier, the panel's Republican co-chairman, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, wrote a column in Breitbart News claiming that there was proof of enough voter fraud in New Hampshire last November to possibly have influenced the outcome of a Senate race.

Over a year ago, residents near Merrimack, New Hampshire learned their drinking water had been contaminated by emissions from a plastics plant owned by the multinational company, Saint-Gobain.  

More than a year later, some residents in Merrimack say state and federal officials haven’t done enough to protect them from the contamination. Now, a few are taking things into their own hands, going door to door.

Nine months ago, Joyce Chance left a refugee camp in Uganda where she had spent the last eleven years. Chance, who was born in Congo, boarded a plane with her two kids, and came to the United States.

A refugee resettlement agency in Concord, New Hampshire picked them up at the airport, and moved them into a one-room apartment.

Next month, a mix of Syrian and Iraqi refugees will begin arriving in Rutland, Vermont. They’ll be the first of 100 that will be resettled there over the next year. Though there's been loud opposition to the plan in the aging, blue-collar city of 16,000, proponents remain optimistic — and many have been volunteering long hours to ensure the plan succeeds.

In the Marines, Dan Crim learned how to strap an air-tight respirator over his mouth and nose to protect himself from a biological threat. He was glad to never have to use one in a combat zone during his five deployments overseas.

Now a retired Marine, Crim wears a respirator whenever he sets foot in the house he bought but no longer lives in.

 

 Several hiker-generated petitions have started in opposition to plans to build a hotel near the summit of Mount Washington, the Northeast's highest peak.

Yesterday, a new report was released with suggestions for how Seacoast communities should prepare for the effects of climate change. The document could influence town planning and development in the region for years.

The report came from the Coastal Risk and Hazards Commission, which was created by the legislature back in 2013. It had 37-members representing Seacoast towns, state agencies, and private-sector interests.

Sheryl Rich-Kern / NHPR

The 2016 election has been a source of significant stress for many Americans across the political spectrum. 

Following their first debate Monday, Hillary Clinton has a 7-point lead over Donald Trump in New Hampshire according to a poll released Friday by WBUR.

Emily Corwin / NHPR

In the last couple years, millions of people across the country have learned their drinking water contains high levels of the contaminants known as perfluorochemicals. These are used to make non-stick products like Teflon and pizza boxes. 

Independent presidential candidate Evan McMullin is not be eligible to be on the ballot in New Hampshire for the November election, according to the Secretary of State’s office.

The former CIA operative announced his campaign bid this week, saying he wants to give voters unhappy with the two major party candidates another option this November.

But Deputy Secretary of State David Scanlan says McMullin didn’t file his declaration of intent paperwork in June, a required step toward getting on the ballot for the fall election.

Calling Donald Trump’s latest controversial comment the last straw, former U.S. Senator Gordon Humphrey of New Hampshire is urging Republican leaders to strip Trump of the presidential nomination and replace him with someone "of sound mind."

Speaking to MSNBC, Humphrey said Trump’s suggestion at a rally Tuesday that gun owners could take action to stop Hillary Clinton from appointing U.S. Supreme Court judges went too far.

While they say there’s much more work to do, advocates and law enforcement officials alike say have some reason to be optimistic about the future of police-community relations in New Hampshire.

“The community as a whole is discussing things a lot more,” Portsmouth Police Chief David Mara said on Tuesday’s episode of The Exchange, which focused on the relationship between law enforcement and minorities. “People are talking a lot more.”

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