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Guns & America

Study: Segregation Is Key Factor For Racial Disparity In Police Shootings

Jul 21, 2019
Pixabay.com

Nationwide, police shoot black people at a rate three times higher than white people. Between 2013 and 2018, 28% of police shooting victims were black, twice their proportion of the overall population, according to the Mapping Police Violence Project.

This Project ChildSafe lock is type of cable lock. The long braided steel cable is stuck down the ejection port and down the magazine well of the gun. The end of the cord fits into the large padlock with a key used to secure the device.
Paul Rubiera / WUNC

Since 2005, if you purchase a gun in the United States, you’re going to be given a free gun lock. It’s a federal law. But many gun safety experts don’t believe the most popular kind of these locks are effective at keeping people, especially older children, from gaining access.

The Hartford Police Department will roll out 325 body cameras to its officers by the end of 2019.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

As public interest in fatal police use of force continues, a growing number of police departments have begun using body-worn cameras as tools for transparency and documentation of civilian interactions.

A recent study found that about a third of older adults don't store their firearms in the safest way -- locked up and unloaded.
Pixabay

Daryl Howard turns 65 in October. He has a Glock .45-caliber handgun stored in his desk at home, but hopes never to use it.

While the hustle of the city may call to some, it doesn’t attract everyone. Many people move to rural areas for the space — a big backyard where they can shoot their guns off the back porch and let children run around. And some move in the pursuit of peace and quiet.

Gunshots And Lockdowns: When Nearby Gun Violence Interrupts The School Day

Jun 21, 2019
A sign is posted outside of Eagle Academy Public Charter School in Washington, D.C., requesting information regarding the shooting death of 15-year-old Maurice Scott, who was killed near the school over Memorial Day weekend.
Tyrone Turner / WAMU

In the daylight hours of a recent Wednesday afternoon, a 33-year-old man was shot and killed in Southeast Washington, D.C., just a short walk from where children at Savoy Elementary School were in their afternoon classes. Hendley Elementary School, roughly a mile away, was recently hit by bullets, reportedly for the second time in a month.

Very Few Gun Owners Want To Buy A Smart Gun

Jun 14, 2019
Inventor Kai Kloepfer displays his fingerprint-activated smart gun during a gun safety technology expo in Milwaukee on Jan. 16, 2019.
Matthew Richmond / ideastream

Smart guns, also known as “personalized guns,” use technology like fingerprint readers or radio frequency identification (RFID) to let only authorized users unlock the gun and fire it.

New research shows many gun owners aren’t interested in purchasing them.

Chris Haxel / Guns & America

Many advocates and politicians push universal background checks on gun purchases as a way to decrease gun violence. But researchers at Johns Hopkins say there’s a more effective solution to preventing homicide and suicide: requiring a license to purchase a handgun. 

Guns Make Some Women Feel Safe, From What?

Jun 7, 2019
Janet Paulsen poses for a portrait at her Acworth, Georgia home on Sunday April 21, 2019. Her estranged husband shot and paralyzed her in 2015.
Bita Honarvar / WABE

At this year’s National Rifle Association annual meeting, President Donald Trump invited some special guests on stage. The first was a young mother from Virginia, April Evans.

“One night in 2015 she was alone with her two-year-old daughter when an intruder broke into her home violently,” said Trump.

'Boys Will Be Boys' Is Killing American Men

May 30, 2019
Jonathan Levinson / OPB

Kneeling in a tree line on a foggy morning in Canby, Oregon, Alex Bates and Andrew Pollmann are scanning the woods for potential threats.

Columbia Township Paramedic Kevin Barnard demonstrates how to apply a tourniquet. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have offered new evidence that a tourniquet can be applied for longer than previously believed.
Matthew Richmond / WCPN

The first time Clevelander Robert Woodard saw someone who had been shot, it was overwhelming.

“So me running to the scene and me getting there and them bleeding and I'm just as hysterical as them,” Woodard remembered. “It's like, ‘Wow, what do I do?’ I have no tools. I have no anything.”

So last summer Woodard, a violence prevention worker with a group called the Wolfpack, completed a first aid training on how to stop bleeding.

The Big Business Of School Security

May 10, 2019
Carlos Osorio / Associated Press

As school security has become a top priority in communities across the country, security companies have found a thriving new market for their products. But in a sea of gadgets and technology, how do school districts effectively sift through and find the products that can truly help prevent a school shooting?

Jonathan Levinson / OPB

Standing in his office adjacent to the Portland Police Bureau’s North Precinct, Roy Moore is explaining how gentrification has escalated some instances of gang violence in the neighborhood.

“We kinda had territories and codes, so I’m not going to go over there unless it’s time to do something,” explained Moore. “Now, it might happen anywhere. Twelve in the morning, nine in the morning going to get my blunt paper, I need my pistol with me now because I don’t know who I’m going to run into.”

In Parts Of Cleveland, You Don't Call 911. You Call Tonto

Apr 29, 2019
Gregory Terrell, Tonto, is a violence interrupter in Cleveland, Ohio. He spends his days driving around neighborhoods on the city's east side, speaking with residents, in the hopes that when there is gun violence, he can help.
Matt Richmond / ideastream

Gregory Terrell is a volunteer violence interrupter in Cleveland, Ohio. He runs a non-profit called Society for Nonviolent Change and works mostly in the Central neighborhood on Cleveland’s East Side. Everyone who knows him calls him Tonto.

Americans Are Killing Romantic Partners More Often, With Guns

Apr 26, 2019
Trinity Kubassek / Pexels

After decades of decline, the rate of Americans killing their intimate partners has seen “a sharp increase” in recent years. Data shows that uptick is exclusively due to gun-related murders.

Heath Druzin / Boise State Public Radio

States across the country are passing gun control legislation in response to mass shootings, as groups like Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America gain political clout. In deep red states, though, activists must both temper their expectations and reckon with residents and lawmakers often hostile to any limitations on their right to bear arms.

Butler County Sheriff's Deputy Doug Hale has worked as a school resource officer for 24 years in the Lakota Local School District near Cincinnati.
Matt Richmond / ideastream

Teachers or other school staff in districts in 31 states can legally carry weapons in schools, according to a review of state laws and local news coverage by Guns & America.

Are You Prepared? Taking A Life In Self-Defense

Mar 29, 2019
PVT Friberg with the Oregon National Guard's 741st Brigade Engineer Battalion clears a building on March 2, 2019 at Camp Rilea, Oregon.
Jonathan Levinson / OPB

Standing in the master bathroom of his Bend, Oregon, home, Brennan Pebbles is describing the night a home intruder shot a rifle through his front window, killed his roommate, and then hunted him through his house.

Brian nairB / Creative Commons

As New Zealand reacts to the deadliest mass shooting in its history, the debate over guns is resurfacing here in Connecticut on many fronts.

The Connecticut Supreme Court has dealt a blow to the company that manufactures the semi-automatic rifle used in the 2012 massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Victims' families allowed to proceed with their lawsuit finally may be able to force Remington Arms into turning over information about how it markets such weapons.

David Wheeler, whose son Ben was killed at Sandy Hook, speaks at a press conference after the Connecticut Supreme Court ruling.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

After months of silence, the Connecticut Supreme Court reinstated a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the families of nine victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting against Remington Arms, the manufacturer of the rifle used in the shooting. 

The House of Representatives side of the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. The House voted on major gun legislation for the first time in decades.
Lisa Dunn / Guns & America

Almost 25 years to the day after the Brady Bill first mandated background checks for some gun sales, House Democrats and a handful of Republicans just voted to require background checks on all gun sales.

The day in 2012 that a gunman killed 27 people and then himself in Sandy Hook, Connecticut, he didn’t just use a semi-automatic rifle. The shooter had an array of handguns, shotguns and rifles, along with hundreds of rounds of ammunition.

The Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting shocked the nation, spurring new conversations about banning so-called assault weapons and magazines that could hold dozens of rounds.

How Are Lockdown Drills Affecting American Kids?

Feb 15, 2019
Adhiti Bandlamudi / North Carolina Public Radio - WUNC

Lockdown drills have become increasingly common in schools across the United States. Though drills differ from school to school, they usually require students to crouch in a corner of their darkened classroom, away from the door, and stay quiet until the teacher says it is okay to start talking again. Students start practicing these drills as early as pre-school, before they can truly understand what threat they are hiding from.

Sandy Hook. Parkland. Santa Fe.

If it seems like school shootings are becoming more common, there is some data to support that.

At the first hearing on gun violence on Capitol Hill since 2011, politicians fell into well-worn party roles, but — as they have for much of the last year — young people brought new energy to the familiar debate.

While federal law prohibits those convicted of domestic violence offenses from buying a gun, the federal background check system is rife with loopholes.
Matthew Warlick for Guns & America

Stephanie Bond was married to her husband for almost 22 years before he called her into the master bedroom one afternoon in February 2010.

Lisa Hagen / WABE

While working as an orthopedic surgeon in Hawaii, Dr. Diane Payne had treated one person with a gunshot wound in three years. But when she moved to Atlanta in 2013, Payne said it was like treating gunshot victims was suddenly all she was doing.

For the first time in nearly a decade, the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case involving constitutional gun rights.

While the ruling will directly affect only a small group of people ‒ New York City residents who are licensed to own a handgun and want to be able to take that gun outside city limits ‒ the court’s decision to accept the case could signal a new willingness to wade into questions surrounding the Second Amendment.

Lawmakers this week are reintroducing federal legislation that would require background checks on nearly all gun purchases — what they call “universal background checks.” But what are universal background checks? Let’s take a look at what they would — and would not — entail.

James Banks has spent his whole life in Cleveland's St. Clair-Superior neighborhood.
Matt Richmond / ideastream

One day not long ago, James Banks, 18, was sitting in his house in the St. Clair–Superior neighborhood in Cleveland. He picked up a tape recorder and turned it on.

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