food | Connecticut Public Radio
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food

Carlos Mejia / Connecticut Public Radio

There's much more to vending machines than those tasty, preservative-laden treats temptingly lined up on display behind the glass casing.

Today we take a magical voyage to find out what these snack dispensers tell us about how we live, what we value, our stresses, and our restraints.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

What if you just don't really enjoy food very much? What if you're totally fine eating the same thing every single day? What if you think food is an inefficient way to get what you need to survive?

What if, rather than eating "food," you just mixed a white powder (that is definitely not made of people because it's made of soy protein isolate instead) with water and drank that in food's place?

This hour: a look at what you might call the non-foodie movement and the "powdered food" meal replacement product that is Soylent.

Summer squash
Seacoast Eat Local (Flickr) / Creative Commons

This vegetable was grown by the Wampanoag Native Americans in New England, but it originated in South America 12,000 years ago. Squash is an integral part of most gardens and there are many different types to grow. I particularly like summer squash.

John Draper and I are sitting in the cab of a tractor on the research farm he manages for the University of Maryland, alongside the Chesapeake Bay. Behind us, there's a sprayer.

"So, away we go!" Draper says. He pushes a button, and we start to move. A fine mist emerges from nozzles on the arms of the sprayer.

We're spraying glyphosate, killing off this field's soil-saving "cover crop" of rye before planting soybeans.

Farmers have been using this chemical, often under the trade name Roundup, for about four decades now.

EwS / Flickr Creative Commons

For the past few months, Nose regular Jacques Lamarre has been posting debate-starting, head-to-head style Facebook posts.

Taylor Swift vs. Katy Perry. Ketchup vs. mustard vs. mayonnaise. When Harry Met Sally vs. Sleepless in Seattle. That kind of thing.

And so now, we've decided to try to turn the concept into a radio show. This hour, YOU MUST CHOOSE.

Lettuce
Emma Cooper (Flickr) / Creative Commons

I've got a riddle for you? What vegetable was eaten by Persian kings, was once considered a weed and is second only to potatoes in consumption in this country? The answer is lettuce.

Garrett Ziegler / flickr creative commons

Father of the Bride is Vampire Weekend's fourth studio album, their first in nearly six years, and their first for a major label. It has been called a "masterpiece" and a "multi-layered dissertation on the world's ills." It's also been called "mild" and "some of the worst ideas the band has ever put to tape." The real question is, though: Is Vampire Weekend still cool?

And then: Gorman Bechard's Pizza, A Love Story has its New Haven premiere in a few weeks at this year's NHdocs documentary film festival. The Nose talks Pizza, specifically, and pizza, more generally, from the pizza capital of the world.

You can get eggplant from your garden if you get started in May.
Michele Dorsey Walfred (Flickr) / Creative Commons

One of the food highlights growing up in Waterbury was my mom's eggplant parmesan. The combination of gooey mozzarella cheese, tomato sauce, and breaded and fried eggplant slices was to die for. It still is, and I love cooking it myself now.

In the tiny town of Laurierville, deep in the heart of Quebec, sits a former furniture warehouse that has been converted to hold half the world's reserve supply of maple syrup. This strategic reserve is designed to stabilize the price and supply of maple syrup for a growing global market, and all commercial maple producers in Quebec are required to deliver part of their crop to the reserve each year.

Ken Hawkins / Creative Commons

Bulimia. Anorexia. Binge-eating. You have likely heard of these eating disorders before. But what are they, really? And who do they affect?

This hour, we talk with advocates and experts in the field, and we also hear from you. Have you or has someone close to you suffered from an eating disorder? Where did you turn for help? 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

What is country music? If you ask Billboard, it's definitely not Lil Nas X's viral sensation, and the number one song in America, "Old Town Road." The song, which was also remixed with country star Billy Ray Cyrus, has country themes, vibes, and sounds country, but Billboard booted it off their country charts.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Workers clustered together at the two entrances to the Stop & Shop store in East Hartford, holding signs in the air and chanting, "Better contract, better lives. Better contract, better lives!"

The store's employees were among unionized workers at Stop & Shop stores across Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island who walked off the job Thursday, after weeks of tense contract negotiations with the supermarket chain that have so far failed to yield a new contract.

Carlos Mejia / Connecticut Public Radio

There's much more to vending machines than those tasty, preservative-laden treats temptingly lined up on display behind the glass casing.

Today we take a magical voyage to find out what these snack dispensers tell us about how we live, what we value, our stresses, and our restraints.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Americans throw out lots of food. Estimates from the EPA say nearly 40 million tons are landfilled or incinerated each year. And in Connecticut, food waste is second only to paper in terms of what people toss in the trash.

So more than five years ago, a new state law began requiring large businesses to recycle their leftover food. The hope was to divert organic waste from the trash bin while enticing recyclers to build in the state.

But getting that recycling industry started has been a challenge.

Pxhere

Where does your food come from? Most of us go to the grocery store to buy produce, dairy, and meat. And these items aren’t necessarily local; they may come from hundreds or thousands of miles away.

This hour we hear how more people are getting involved in producing the food they eat. It’s called “modern homesteading.”

We hear from two Connecticut residents who’ve tried this practice. What drove them to pursue homesteading? And what barriers exist for Connecticut residents who want to live off the land? We find out.

Basil
Yamanaka Tamaki (Flickr) / Creative Commons

There's nothing better than having fresh herbs at your fingertips when cooking your favorite recipes. Our tomato sauces always taste better in summer when we can add fresh basil, oregano, and parsley to the mix. But you don't have to have a large herb garden to have fresh herbs. Many herbs grow well in containers on a deck, balcony or patio. This is great because you don't have to venture far to harvest the leaves.

Nate Steiner (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Broccoli has taken a long road to get to our tables. It's descended from wild cabbages. For over 2000 years, Italian and Greek farmers have carefully selected varieties to produce the current version of the vegetable many love.

Ken Hawkins / Creative Commons

Bulimia. Anorexia. Binge-eating. You have likely heard of these eating disorders before. But what are they, really? And who do they affect?

This hour, we talk with advocates and experts in the field, and we also hear from you. Have you or has someone close to you suffered from an eating disorder? Where did you turn for help? 

EwS / flickr creative commons

For the past few months, Nose regular Jacques Lamarre has been posting debate-starting, head-to-head style Facebook posts.

Taylor Swift vs. Katy Perry. Ketchup vs. mustard vs. mayonnaise. When Harry Met Sally vs. Sleepless in Seattle. That kind of thing.

And so now, we've decided to try to turn the concept into a radio show. This hour, YOU MUST CHOOSE.

For 27 years, Mark Schand lay in his prison cot in Massachusetts and plotted out the retail empire he'd been envisioning since well before his arrest.

"I would lay in bed, my eyes wide open, looking at the ceiling, just thinking of a color scheme, and picture the uniform," said Schand.

woodleywonderworks (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Happy Valentine's Day. If you haven't made plans for the big day yet, perhaps try a different gift, such as a hot pepper plant? After all, it does have red fruits and may spice up the evening for you.

Dean Hochman / flickr.com/photos/deanhochman/

We're doing a show on supermarkets today - from a supermarket!

Most Americans still buy most of their food from a supermarket. While farmer's markets and specialty stores offer organic and local alternatives, large-scale supermarkets still offer more convenience, the lowest prices and a seemingly endless variety of choices. Their big wide aisles with neatly stacked and eye-catching packaged products are hard to resist. 

Susy Morris (Flickr) / Creative Commons

I used to place onions in the same category as potatoes when it comes to growing them in our garden. It's so easy to buy fresh onions in markets and grocery stores, why bother growing them?

This Valentine's Day is going to be a little less sweet.

SweetHearts, the colorful, heart-shaped candies with sugary messages like "Kiss Me" and "My Love" will be scarce this year. If you're lucky enough to find them, they'll be from last year's batch.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Coast Guard active-duty personnel and their families are benefitting from local food banks as they deal with the financial uncertainty of the government shutdown.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Senior citizens and residents living below the poverty line may soon struggle to meet their basic food needs because of the government shutdown.

Think about the last time you went to the supermarket. You probably spent no more than a few seconds choosing from all the different brands of toothpaste, frozen peas or oatmeal.

Those few seconds used to be the holy grail for brands, the moment you would get hooked forever on that Tide detergent or Heinz ketchup — an event referred to as "the first moment of truth." But lately, the moment of truth has moved to the Internet. What's more, ripples from the 2008 recession have changed us as shoppers.

More and more people have started saying: "I'm not a brand person."

In the past few years, coconut oil has been called a superfood that can help you blast belly fat and raise your good cholesterol. The sweet and nutty trendsetter has been featured in many cookbooks as a substitute for olive or canola oil — and it can cost a bundle at the store.

A recent survey found that 72 percent of Americans say coconut oil is a "healthy food," but many nutrition experts aren't convinced.

Dean Hochman / Creative Commons

We're doing a show on supermarkets today - from a supermarket!

Most Americans still buy most of their food from a supermarket. While farmer's markets and specialty stores offer organic and local alternatives, large-scale supermarkets still offer more convenience, the lowest prices and a seemingly endless variety of choices. Their big wide aisles with neatly stacked and eye-catching packaged products are hard to resist. 

U.S. Department of Agriculture / Creative Commons

On Thursday, the Department of Agriculture announced a regulatory proposal that would impose stricter work requirements on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and strip states of their ability to make decisions based on local job conditions. The announcement comes after a Republican failure to impose those restrictions within the Farm Bill.

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