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ethics

The legislature’s Public Health Committee heard testimony Wednesday from supporters and opponents of a bill that would legalize physician-assisted suicide in Connecticut. 

The legislation would allow a physician to prescribe medication to a patient who has six months or less to live, and has been deemed mentally competent. The patient could then take the drug to end their life. 

Critics says Connecticut’s bill lacks adequate safeguards and could lead to abuse of the disabled and elderly. 

Former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez was back in court today, appealing his 2010 convictions on corruption-related charges. Perez was sentenced to three years in prison but has been free while his appeal is pending. Perez was convicted for two separate incidents.

Chion Wolf

Federal authorities made seven new arrests in their investigation into the campaign of house speaker Chris Donovan

The arrests circle around an alleged scheme to cover up campaign donations that were aimed at using Donovan’s influence as speaker of the house to kill a bill aimed at “roll your own smoke shops.”  

Chion Wolf

In 2005, driven by our shame of the scandals surrounding governor John Rowland and other public officials, Connecticut passed sweeping election and ethics reforms that were hailed all over the nation for making the state one of the leaders in cleaning up government.

Racial Profiling

Mar 12, 2012
Emad Ghazipura (Flickr Creative Commons)

It has been a sad - but well-known - fact that in many communities, “Driving While Black” or “Driving While Hispanic” can be seen as a reason to get pulled over by police.

While the state has a law that mandates reports on the ethnicity of drivers pulled over in traffic stops - that data is not universally reported by towns. And the state agency that collects it is overburdened.

Chion Wolf

Pregnancy brings a rollercoaster of emotions for women and their partners.

Those 9 months bring parents anxiety, excitement, a sense of wonder, and joy. It's during the first trimester when mothers are first asked about whether they want to have genetic tests done to check on the baby's development.

How do parents decide if they want to undergo tests and what happens when results come back with news they weren't expecting?

James Gordon (Flickr Creative Commons)

President Obama promised to close the Guantanamo Bay prison, used to hold suspected terrorists. Ten years after 9/11...we’re seemingly no closer to a resolution about how to handle these detainees.

Attorney General Eric Holder went out on a limb - calling for civilian trials - only to have his idea ditched by the administration.

School Arrests

Dec 16, 2011
Rob.Wall, creative commons

Hundreds of students are arrested each year in Connecticut schools.  That’s the finding of a new report by C-Hit - the Connecticut Health Investigative Team.  They reviewed data from the Connecticut judicial department - and their story points to instances where “zero tolerance” policies often mean students in handcuffs, even for minor offenses.  Today we talk to reporter Lisa Chedekel. 

David Baker (Flickr Creative Commons)

If you’ve listened to this show for a while, you know I’m from Pittsburgh. And that makes me a Steelers fan. Steelers fans root for their team in good seasons and bad, and have always had a belief that their players embody the spirit of Art Rooney, one of the founders of the modern NFL. Their players are tough and gritty, without being thuggish. They play hard…and they play right.

Then, you see this.

That’s from last Thursday night.

Chion Wolf

When Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi was killed last month, the photos quickly become public and the media had to make a decision.

Many news organizations had slideshows of Gadhafi’s death on their websites. Some published the photos in their newspapers. Even fewer put it on the front page.

Anthrax Attacks

Oct 28, 2011

The Anthrax attacks of 2001 terrified a nation already shaken by 9/11.  Five people died, and many others were sickened.  One death hit home - 94 year old Ottellie Lundgren of Oxford Connecticut.

Photo: City of Hartford

In Hartford, city officials have been wrestling with a possible ethical issue for months.  The question was whether the city treasurer should be allowed to supervise his wife.  Now, as WNPR's Jeff Cohen reports, city officials say an agreement is near.

Eleven teachers involved in a cheating scandal at a Waterbury elementary school returned to work on Tuesday. The teachers will lose 20 days of pay and must perform community service as after-school tutors.

#OccupyWallSt

Oct 4, 2011
carwil, creative commons

It started three weeks ago with a small group of protesters, a vague list of objectives, and a central message: Occupy Wall Street.

The movement has picked up steam - adding thousands of protesters, with a still evolving list of concerns.  Aimed at corporate America and the wealthiest 1% of the nation’s taxpayers, another central theme of the protest is: “We are the 99%.”

For the better part of a week, the biggest story in the media was the perceived lack of coverage of the protests... by the media.

Animal Rights

Jul 5, 2011
Mike Baird

Michael Vick is once again a star in the Nike universe - only a few years after serving time for his role in a dog-fighting ring.

In The Liar in Your Life, psychology professor Robert Feldman, one of the world's leading authorities on deception, draws on his immense body of knowledge to give fresh insights into how and why we lie, how our culture has become increasingly tolerant of deception, the cost it exacts on us, and what to do about it. His work is at once surprising and sobering, full of corrections for common myths and explanations of pervasive oversimplifications. 

W.W. Norton, publishers

A 24-hour news cycle, media moguls with political agendas, blurred lines between news and commentary. To many, these are sign’s that today’s media couldn’t be farther removed from the integrity of its roots.

After more than two decades reporting on the Media, NPR’s Brooke Gladstone is of the opinion that we’ve been here before, and it’s actually been worse. Gladstone presents her manifesto in the new book The Influencing Machine.

Campaign Finance

Mar 28, 2011

In just a few hours the US Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in an Arizona case that may affect Connecticut's public campaign finance system.  We talk to Deirdre Shesgreen of the Connecticut Mirror about her recent article.

clip art

The Bridgeport Mayor's Election  Advisory Panel released a report today (Thursday) detailing dozens of recommendations to change how Connecticut runs its elections. The proposal is meant to restore trust in the system after Bridgeport's infamous failure to order enough ballots during last November's elections.

One recommendation allows Secretary of the State Denise Merrill to recommend how many ballots a town should order.  And, after review, it could allow her to force the town to order enough ballots for all of the town's registered voters.  

Andres Rueda, Creative Commons

Flickr Creative Commons, Tim Green aka atoach

A recent round of questions about conflicts of interest in the U.S. Supreme Court may place all three branches of government on a collision course.

Flickr Creative Commons, Sam Howzit

Until recently, I didn't understand the degree to which Connecticut jury selection process -- called the voir dire -- differs from those of other states.

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