environment | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

environment

Embrace Your Inner Naturalist

Jan 18, 2019
Matthew Messina / www.matturalist.com

With each new year come the same old resolutions. Go on a diet. Join a gym... But what if this year, we vowed to try something different? Unplug from technology. Spend more time in nature.

This hour, we consider ways to become better connected to the natural world.

Suzanne Proulx / http://www.suzanneproulx.com/

Dust is a fascinating substance. Our bodies are always shedding dust from our skin, hair, and nails, leaving little bits of DNA wherever we roam. Dust floats unseen through the air around us. It's light. It's hard to see unless it lands on a contrasting surface or crosses the path of a ray of sunshine. It can travel far and wide.  

Clarice Silber / CT Mirror

Shuttered national parks, TSA workers calling in sick, hundreds of thousands of paychecks missed. Americans around the country are feeling the impact of the longest government shutdown in U.S. history. But it’s not just federal employees who are struggling.

This hour, we find out how the shutdown is affecting some of the country’s most vulnerable residents.

Five Ways To Reduce Your Carbon Footprint

Jan 11, 2019
Seth Wynes and Kimberly Nicholas / Enviromental Research Letters

It takes more than just recycling to make a difference to the climate crisis. Small steps like eating less meat can reduce methane gases and make a positive impact on the environment.

The Block Island Wind Farm off the coast of Rhode Island in October, 2016.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut has joined nine states for a landmark agreement to reduce carbon emissions from transportation in the Northeast region.

This hour, as the federal government backs away from fighting climate change, what role can states play?

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A new operator has been selected to run a key port in New London. The management shakeup at State Pier comes with an eye toward capitalizing on the growing market for offshore wind energy.

Millstone Power Station

Connecticut’s only nuclear plant has won a bid to provide customers with electricity over the next decade. The award comes at a time when offshore wind and solar energy continue to grow.

Bob Adelman / Free the Beaches: The Story of Ned Coll and the Battle for America’s Most Exclusive Shoreline

Each summer, Connecticut residents flock to the shoreline, raising umbrellas and spreading towels along the state's beaches. Yet, behind this sunny imagery hides a somber history -- a story of coastal ownership and exclusivity.

This hour, Free the Beaches author Andrew Kahrl joins us. We reflect on the impact of Connecticut’s private and restricted beaches and learn about a 20th-century crusade to unlock the state’s coast.

Matthew Messina / www.matturalist.com

With each new year come the same old resolutions. Go on a diet. Join a gym... But what if, for 2019, we vowed to try something different? Unplug from technology. Spend more time in nature.

This hour, we consider ways to become better connected to the natural world.

Jason D. Neely

It began as a six-month assignment covering the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. But NPR reporter Adrian Florido has been on the ground in Puerto Rico for more than a year now.

This hour, we check in with Florido. What changes has he observed since arriving on the island?

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Researchers in Puerto Rico say hurricanes Irma and María made long-lasting and ongoing impacts to forest and coastal ecosystems.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

The latest national climate assessment says forests play a key role in keeping our air clean.

pedrik / Creative Commons

Water customers around Hartford who are having trouble paying their bill could be eligible for assistance. That’s because Operation Fuel has teamed up with the MDC to help households struggling with payments.

Wikimedia Commons

Nearly 60 percent of Connecticut is forest. But the state is also one of the most densely-populated in the country. And now, a new report says that provides unique opportunities for animals and people to co-exist.

Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

Tobacco has been grown in Connecticut for hundreds of years. But the number of acres has shrunk dramatically, from more than 20,000 a century ago down to do 2,000 today. Now, growers are facing economic pressure to develop their land.

The Future Of Connecticut's Changing Climate

Nov 21, 2018
Steve Laschever

Happy Thanksgiving! This week, The Wheelhouse is out enjoying a well-deserved break and being thankful for Colin McEnroe. We’ll be back next week giving you the latest news on all things politics in Connecticut.

A little brown bat confirmed to have white-nose syndrome.
USFWS / Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) / Creative Commons

The fungal disease white-nose syndrome has killed off millions of bats across America. Since it was first identified in 2006, it’s appeared on bats in more than 30 states, including all of New England, Quebec, and the Maritimes.

Now, scientists are trying to learn more about the impact of this devastating disease, by listening to the calls of the bats left behind.

Aftermath of the Camp Fire in Paradise, Calif.
California National Guard / Creative Commons

California is still reeling from the deadliest wildfires in that state's history. Connecticut's wildfires are much smaller in comparison. 

Wikimedia Commons

Massive wildfires are devastating California, with dozens dead and hundreds of thousands of residents evacuated. This hour we talk with author and environmental journalist Michael Kodas about why wildfires today are so much larger and more destructive than ever before. Do you have family or friends who’ve been affected by blazes across the west?

Ed Dunens / Flickr

As President Trump talks about draining the swamp in Washington D.C., we turn our attention to actual swamps. Associated with death and decay, while also celebrated for their beauty and biodiversity, few landscapes evoke such contradictory sentiments as swamps.

Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

A group of civil engineers gathered in Hartford Tuesday to urge voters approve a ballot question that would establish a lockbox for transportation money. It’s a last-minute push that comes as a new report says the state’s roads and bridges are in need of major investment.

sagesolar / Creative Commons

A federal judge has dismissed a lawsuit challenging a legislative raid of money set aside to make homes and businesses more energy efficient. It’s a decision viewed as a setback for environmentalists and energy contractors in the state.

Zappys Technology Solutions Photostream / Flickr

About 2000 years ago the Chinese came up with something really great: paper! Paper has allowed us to share ideas around the globe, record important historical events, build on our past success, create art, architecture, literature, music and more that may live on long on after we're gone.

Dean Hochman / Creative Commons

Old mattresses are bulky and hard to move. They can also be a pain to throw out. But a program aimed at recycling those old mattresses and boxsprings appears to be filling a much-needed void in the state.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Voters this November won’t only be deciding on a long list of candidates for elected office. They’ll also decide two ballot questions which, for the first time in a decade, could amend the state’s constitution.

Ozzy Delaney / Creative Commons

One of the nation’s most iconic creatures continues its comeback. A state report indicates bald eagles are returning to Connecticut in record numbers.

Two issues continue to dominate this year's race for governor: taxes and the economy.

That notion has been reinforced by the latest Quinnipiac University poll. Of the likely voters surveyed, 31% said the economy was their chief concern, while 26% said it was taxes.

Climate change wasn't even an issue listed in the poll question. It's also been left largely unaddressed by those running for governor this year.

A Denmark-based company will acquire the developer of America's first-ever offshore wind farm.

Ørsted announced Monday it entered into an agreement to purchase Rhode Island-based Deepwater Wind for a price tag of $510 million.

Carmen Baskauf / WNPR

Do you worry about how you’re everyday actions contribute to climate change? You may think about the carbon gas-burning cars are putting into the atmosphere, or coal-powered electricity in your houses.

But what about the food you eat?

Streetwise Cycle / Wikimedia Commons

When you put your recycling into those big blue bins on the curb for garbage night, do you ever think about where all that trash goes?

Pages