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elections

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill randomly drew names of voting precincts from a lottery machine on Wednesday, revealing the polling places that will be subject to an audit for the 2019 municipal election.

A controversial new residency law in New Hampshire is creating confusion, and has led to charges of voter suppression and a legal challenge.

Backers say the law clarifies the state’s voting rules and brings New Hampshire in line with all other states, but opponents say it is a blatant effort by Republicans to block college students who hail from other states from voting.

Chion Wolf

During presidential election years, a majority of Americans vote. According to the United States Elections Project, about 60% of eligible voters cast ballots in the 2016 election. 

In New England, percentages vary by state, with Maine and New Hampshire at the high end with just above 70% casting ballots, and Rhode Island at the low end, matching the national average. But no matter how you break it down, the reality is a lot of people are choosing not to vote.

Sacred Heart University students say they experienced what the university calls “borderline voter suppression” at polling places in Bridgeport yesterday.

Are there any lessons we can learn from last night? Probably not. The predicted trends, like “The Trump Effect” didn’t really emerge. The state was split between Republican and Democratic victories.

Updated at 2:45 a.m. ET Wednesday

Democrats had a strong election night on Tuesday, leading the race for governor in Kentucky and taking back full control of the Virginia legislature for the first time in nearly a quarter century.

Will There Be A Trump Factor Today In Connecticut?

Nov 5, 2019
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Today’s municipal elections feature unusual bids for redemption by losers of Democratic primaries in two of the state’s largest cities, as Marilyn Moore attempts a write-in campaign to unseat Joseph P. Ganim in Bridgeport and Mayor Toni N. Harp continues as a third-party candidate following her decisive loss to Justin Elicker in September.

Supreme Court Declines To Stop Bridgeport Election

Nov 4, 2019
Connecticut Supreme Court Justice Richard N. Palmer and Chief Justice Richard A. Robinson listen to arguments before the court decided to allow elections to proceed in Bridgeport tomorrow. At issue is the validity of the results of September's primary in
Mark Mirko / Hartford Courant

The Connecticut Supreme Court declined Monday to postpone Tuesday’s mayoral election in Bridgeport over allegations of absentee ballot fraud in the Democratic primary, while leaving open the possibility the court might use the case to eventually clarify standards for challenging suspect election results.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Tuesday, November 5 is Election Day in Connecticut. This means another opportunity for residents to cast ballots for town and city officials. But who will turn out to the polls?

This hour, we check in with reporters and analysts from across the state, and we also hear from you. Will you vote this Election Day? Why or why not?

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Tuesday was the deadline in Connecticut to register to vote before Election Day, Nov. 5. If you happened to miss the deadline and still want to exercise your democratic rights, don’t despair.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

A new candidate who has just entered the mayoral race in Bridgeport could cause confusion at the ballot box November 5. The issue centers on whether marking the candidate's initials on a ballot to indicate a write-in vote will be enough.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The language of politics--of America, really--has gotten quite a bit uglier over the last few years. And the last few weeks in Connecticut are a case in point. Female political leaders from both major parties faced online insults and threats, and prompted a call from the governor and others for a more civil tone.

Wikimedia Commons

Not all of the presidential campaigning this primary season is on the Democratic side. A few Republicans are challenging President Trump. One who’s best known to New England is Bill Weld, former governor of Massachusetts.

Weld is fiscally conservative and socially liberal. He ran for Vice President as a Liberatarian in 2016, and he says that’s the sort of thing that plays well among New England voters. He’s trailing Trump badly in the polls, but is spending a lot of time in New Hampshire talking to voters about issues like immigration and climate change.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

An elections official in Coventry could soon be the subject of a state investigation.

Records Subpoenaed In Bridgeport Mayoral Primary

Sep 23, 2019
Gemeem Davis, the manager of the Marilyn Moore campaign, center, and Max Medina, at right, the campaign's lawyer.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

With unanimous votes to subpoena election records and other evidence, the State Elections Enforcement Commission opened an investigation Monday into allegations of voter fraud in the Bridgeport mayoral primary won Mayor Joseph P. Ganim on the strength of a lopsided absentee ballot vote. 

Can Marilyn Moore Duplicate Mike Jarjura’s Write-in Win?

Sep 19, 2019

State Sen. Marilyn Moore’s decision to continue her mayoral campaign against Bridgeport Mayor Joseph P. Ganim as a write-in candidate puts her on a path that is extraordinarily difficult — but not wholly uncharted in Connecticut. 

In Bridgeport, Moore Demands An Investigation -- By Everyone

Sep 13, 2019
Sen. Marilyn Moore / Facebook

State Sen. Marilyn Moore issued a puzzling statement Thursday night demanding that Gov. Ned Lamont, Democratic Party officials and unnamed authorities investigate her suspicions of absentee-ballot fraud in the Democratic mayoral primary she narrowly lost Tuesday to Bridgeport Mayor Joseph P. Ganim. 

Justin Elicker may have provided the upset in New Haven, but Bridgeport’s Democratic challenger Marilyn Moore left the biggest questions on Connecticut’s primary night.

Moore, a state senator, came closer to incumbent mayor Joe Ganim than almost anyone had predicted, finishing with an unofficial tally of 5,021 to Ganim’s 5,269. 

Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

Former New Haven alder Justin Elicker pulled off a huge upset in that city's Democratic mayoral primary, ousting incumbent Mayor Toni Harp. It was a rematch for the two. Six years ago it was Harp who bested Elicker to lead the city. This time, the challenger won a comfortable victory, with an unofficial total of 6,825 machine votes to 4,841.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Voters in two dozen Connecticut communities are at the polls today to choose candidates to run for mayor and other top municipal posts. Polling places are open until 8:00pm this evening.

Twenty-Five Primaries Today, With Focus On New Haven

Sep 10, 2019
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Mayors in three of Connecticut’s four largest cities face challenges today as voters go to the polls in 25 municipal primaries, intra-family fights that typically turn on hyper-local issues, personal ambitions and, occasionally, old grudges. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Luke Bronin has been mayor of Hartford since 2016. Now, with the mayoral primary race just around the corner, Bronin is hoping that Democratic voters in the city will choose him as their party’s nominee. 

This hour, we sit down with Mayor Bronin.

Members of the media watch the debate just outside the room it was being filmed in at Hartford. The debate is one of three between four Democratic mayoral candidates over the next week.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Democratic candidates for the 2019 Hartford mayoral election debated Thursday night.

The field includes party-endorsed incumbent Mayor Luke Bronin, J. Stan McCauley, who is a Democrat endorsed by the Republican party, and two candidates that petitioned their way onto the primary ballot -- state Representative Brandon McGee and former Mayor Eddie Perez.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Brandon McGee is a Democratic state representative and petitioning candidate for mayor of his native city of Hartford.

This hour, we sit down with Rep. McGee. We discuss his background and campaign platform, and we also hear from you.

Are you a Hartford resident? What issue, or issues, would you like to hear Rep. McGee address ahead of the Sept. 10 primary? 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim is seeking reelection this fall. The Democrat will face state senator Marilyn Moore in the September 10th primary. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Joe Ganim’s election as Bridgeport’s mayor in 2015 was an unlikely comeback story. 

Reelected after seven years in federal prison for felony corruption, Ganim got a second chance. And now, he is asking for their vote to put him back in the mayor’s office once more.

This hour, we sit down with Joe Ganim ahead of the September 10th Democratic primary. 

If you’re a Bridgeport resident, we want to hear from you. What questions do you have for Mayor Ganim? We take your calls, tweets, and Facebook comments.

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut’s three biggest cities have mayoral elections this year that could determine what’s next for New Haven, Bridgeport and Hartford.

This week, we have a special program, talking with experts watching these races closely. We give you the latest on city politics, and why they matter to you, even if you don’t live there. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Leading to Primary Day 2019, Where We Live sat down with mayoral candidates in Connecticut's biggest cities.

Listen to the full length interviews below.

Sen. Marilyn Moore / Facebook

This hour, we talk with Democratic State Sen. Marilyn Moore who, in addition to representing the 22nd District, is campaigning for mayor of Bridgeport, Connecticut.

What is her strategy to successfully unseat the city's current mayor, Joe Ganim? We find out and we also hear from you.

Consensus Elusive On Election Security

Aug 14, 2019
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut’s current system of casting and counting votes has its roots in the chaotic presidential election of 2000. With the winner unclear for a month, it was a frightening moment in U.S. politics that led to a bipartisan consensus about the need to maintain confidence in the integrity of elections. 

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