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Allen Allen / Creative Commons

The American criminal justice system has become less 'just' over recent decades and prosecutors bear much of the responsibility.

Marco Verch / Creative Commons

It's just Colin and your calls.

It's Eddie A. Perez's Turn To Ask For A Second Chance

Apr 4, 2019
Eddie Perez surrounded by supporters Thursday night.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

By turns contrite and defiant, Eddie A. Perez launched a populist campaign for mayor of Hartford on Thursday, attacking the downtown corporations that once backed him and testing the notion of whether Connecticut’s capital is ready to join its largest city, Bridgeport, in returning a corrupt former mayor to City Hall.

Marc Nozell / Creative Commons

There are those who hope Joe Biden, as he weighs a 2020 presidential run, hasn't lost his touch for personal connections. There are others who wish he would.

A Connecticut resident is among the two women who came forward this week with complaints that the former Democratic vice president violated their personal space when greeting them at campaign events. Amy Lappos, a former staffer for U.S. Rep Jim Himes, says Biden pulled her toward him to rub noses. As it was happening, Lappos thought Biden intended to kiss her, she says.

Updated at 10:03 a.m. ET

The release of special counsel Robert Mueller's report may provide Americans with the best playbook yet on how to defend democracy in the lead-up to the 2020 presidential election.

GOP Flips Two Legislative Seats In Five Special Elections

Feb 26, 2019
Members of Connecticut's House of Representatives were sworn in on January 9, 2019. Two new members will be sworn in after winning special elections on Tuesday.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Republicans won two of the five state legislative seats at stake in special elections Tuesday, flipping House and Senate districts by carrying blue-collar communities that have grown difficult for Democrats. All five vacancies were the result of Gov. Ned Lamont hiring Democratic legislators in January.

CHION WOLF / CT Public Radio

The Department of Justice and the state of Connecticut have a plan for how they’ll share information about deceased voters -- an attempt to make sure voter rolls are accurate. 

Criminal Justice Division

A former top lawyer for the state Republican party has been charged with stealing more than a quarter of a million dollars from a political action committee fund. Michael Cronin, who was treasurer of the fund, and a trusted employee of the party for years, first confessed in December that he had been taking cash. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Elections aren't for another nine or so months, but mayoral races are heating up across Connecticut. That includes those in the state's three largest cities where the top municipal leaders are Democrats, and challengers from within the party keep emerging.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Election Day 2019 will feature mayoral races in Connecticut’s biggest cities. Candidates challenging established incumbents are beginning to emerge.

Connecticut State Capitol / Wikimedia Commons

The new wave of progressive Democrats, both in the Connecticut General Assembly and in Washington, D.C., isn't waiting for the 2020 election to bring about big changes.

In Connecticut, there is emboldened optimism for increasing the state's minimum wage, like Massachusetts just did and allowing early voting, like New York, which is on the verge of enacting.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Democrats in the Connecticut General Assembly look like they’ll make early voting a signature issue this session. They’re introducing legislation seeking a referendum on an amendment to the state’s constitution. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut's 88th governor, Dannel P. Malloy, loves to make decisions. "That's who I am and what I am," he proclaimed during a wide-ranging exit interview with Colin McEnroe.

He also, undoubtedly, loves to get the last word, no matter if it's on state employee pension reforms, his handling of an unspeakable tragedy, severe weather events, or the results of the 2018 election.

When it comes to election fraud, the "voting twice by dressing up with a different hat" tactic that President Trump talks about almost never happens.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public

We’re still finding out results from last Tuesday’s elections in Connecticut and that’s not surprising, really. Some of the races were just really close. That’s probably a good thing.

Another good thing: Lots of people showing up to vote. Gigantic numbers showing up to vote in a midterm election in Connecticut and just about everywhere.

The bad thing: We still can’t seem to get this election thing right at least in our cities.

This hour, we look at possible fixes.

Democrat Jahana Hayes addresses her supporters in Waterbury after declaring victory in her U.S. House race against Republican Manny Santos. Hayes becomes the first black woman elected to Congress in Connecticut.
Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

A record number of residents voted on Tuesday -- electing, among others, Connecticut’s first African American woman to Congress. This hour we talk with Jahana Hayes about her historic win. We also break down what happened in other midterm races, where Democrats achieved major victories in the governorship and General Assembly.

And we want to hear from you. What issues do you want our newest leaders to tackle first?

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Women won big in these 2018 Connecticut midterm elections. This follows a national trend sparked in response to the 2016 election of Donald Trump. More women ran and more women won, many in seats not held by a Democrat in decades, let alone by a woman. 

Today, an hour with several of Connecticut's new female legislators. 

Mark Goebel / Creative Commons

We have a tradition on the show of celebrating voting and the people who vote by speaking to thoughtful "citizen observers" from around the state about their experience of voting on this Election Day. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's November 6, which means the wait for Election Day is finally over.


As Connecticut voters head to the polls, we sit down with reporters and election officials to preview the day ahead.

Do you plan on voting? We want to hear from you, too.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Republican Manny Santos is vying for the 5th Congressional District seat that’s about to be vacated by Democrat Elizabeth Esty.

Little Hinges USA / Google Images

Are you one of those people who wants to vote for Oz Griebel for governor but won't because you're afraid your vote might lead to a win for your least favorite candidate? 

Chion Wolf

This hour, we sit down with AMiGo Constitution Party candidate Mark Stewart.

Adam Rosen / Congregation B'Nai Israel

The crowd of more than 750 people that gathered at Congregation B'Nai in Bridgeport for CONECT's Candidate Assembly on Monday was not expecting Shawn Wooden's vulnerabilty. They'd come to hear how five candidates running for statewide offices would respond to questions on four issues—gun violence, immigration, health care, and criminal justice reform—but it was the Democratic candidate for treasurer's story about gun violence, along with mothers Kristin Song's and Mory Hernandez's stories, that stood out.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we sit down with Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont.

What is Lamont's strategy for reaching Connecticut voters ahead of the November 6 election? We find out and we also hear from you. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

He was at the head of the Hartford-area economic development group, MetroHartford Alliance, from 2001 to last year. Now, he wants to be governor of Connecticut.

This hour we sit down with Oz Griebel, who is running as an unaffiliated candidate for governor of Connecticut.

Temperature Rising In Conn. Gubernatorial Debate

Oct 18, 2018
From left, Oz Griebel, Ned Lamont and Bob Stefanowski.
CTMirror.org

Republican Bob Stefanowski’s bold promise to eliminate Connecticut’s income tax over eight years came under withering attack Thursday by Democrat Ned Lamont and Oz Griebel, a petitioning candidate struggling to be taken seriously in the waning weeks of the race for governor.

A number of states are blocking web traffic from foreign countries to their voter registration websites, making the process harder for some U.S. citizens who live overseas to vote, despite the practice providing no real security benefits.

Donkey Hotey / Creative Commons

  

Newt Gingrich and Bill Clinton were using strategies to deliberately divide America's political system decades before the pivotal 2000 presidential election between Al Gore and George W. Bush divided us into gangs of  'red' or 'blue.'

Pixabay / Creative Commons

Today, we've booked no guests. It's Colin and your calls. 

Saturday's confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court was the anticlimatic coda to a nomination that has both riveted and more deeply divided our country.

Depending on your view, the Kavanaugh confirmation either endangers the legitimacy of the court or is a welcome culmination to a decades-long effort to capture a solid conservative majority on the high court.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The state of Connecticut is hardening its voting systems against potential cybersecurity threats. The Secretary of the State’s office has decided how to allocate $5 million in federal funds on election security.

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