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elections

Updated at 1:43 p.m. ET

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is planning to stay in the 2020 Democratic presidential race despite another disappointing primary night.

Two weeks ago, Sanders was the unlikely front-runner for the nomination. Now former Vice President Joe Biden has consolidated support so rapidly, and won so many states, that Sanders is facing calls to drop out of the race.

But Sanders announced his intention to press on in a statement on Wednesday.

In the second biggest Democratic primary night next to Super Tuesday, March 10 has six contests. Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, North Dakota and Washington state are choosing Democratic presidential nominees.

Follow NPR's live coverage, including results and analysis.

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Populism is on the rise from Europe to India to the United States.

Americans elected Donald Trump on his promise to "Drain the swamp" of a political elite no longer responsive to their needs. Populists almost took control of Germany, France, and the Netherlands in 2017. Former prime minister of Italy Silvio Berlusconi regained power seven short years after being ousted from office for corruption. 

Theresa Thompson / Creative Commons

Sanders won big in Nevada. Biden won big in South Carolina. Steyer and Buttigieg are out, Bloomberg is in, and Warren and Klobuchar are pulling up the rear.

There will be 1,357 delegates from 14 states up for grabs on Super Tuesday. We try to make sense of it.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

This November, 32 million Latinos will be eligible to vote in the 2020 election, making them the largest minority voting bloc in the United States, according to the Pew Research Center. But Latinos are a diverse electorate—with roots from more than two dozen countries. 

This hour, what are President Trump and the Democrats doing right now to reach these voters?

Phil Roeder / Creative Commons

Bernie Sanders won a decisive victory in last week's Nevada caucuses after effectively tying with Pete Buttigieg in the less diverse states of Iowa and New Hampshire. Is he the candidate that can beat President Trump? Or the one who will lead the Democratic Party down the road to ruin? It depends on who you talk to. 

Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

Listen Monday at 9:00 am.

They grew up during a digital revolution, two foreign wars, and a devastating financial crisis.  Now, millennials are beginning to come into political power, and those formative experiences shaping them into a different kind of politician than found in past generations.

This hour, we talk with TIME national political correspondent Charlotte Alter. Her new book is called “The Ones We’ve Been Waiting For: How a New Generation of Leaders Will Transform America.” We learn--about the forces that have shaped millennials’ unique political experience and what this  means for the future of the country.

John Dankosky / Connecticut Public

The Democratic primary season is just getting started. How have the results from the New Hampshire primary affected how you might vote? 

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The Atlantic writer McKay Coppins says President Trump's reelection team is waging a massive disinformation campaign that uses the same tactics of information warfare used by autocrats like Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte and by Russian President Vladimir Putin in our 2016 election.

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We're back on the air -- at least for today -- and we're taking your calls. Give us a call at 888-720-9677 (888-720-WNPR). It's been a dizzying week between the Super Bowl and impeachment and now...

The Iowa caucuses descended into chaos Monday night after we all learned that results would be delayed until later on Tuesday. Problems with a new app led to frustration, mistrust, and renewed questions over whether Iowa should remain first in the nation. Does the caucus system even work? Why don't we just hold a national primary?

Unfortunately, candidates got lost under the pile of problems. Each claimed either victory or a very good showing in a caucus in which many Democrats remained undecided until the end. Is Michael Bloomberg the winner in this mess?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Leading Democratic presidential candidates meet once again on the debate stage this week.  The stakes are higher than ever for presidential hopefuls, because the first primaries are just around the corner. This hour, we check in with New Hampshire where voters will head to the polls in less than a month.

Is there a better way to narrow candidates for President than the state-by-state primary system? 

And later, a high-profile murder case in Connecticut has led to a proposal to reform the way domestic violence cases are treated in family courts.

The White House

Voters in favor of Brexit handed British Prime Minister Boris Johnson an electoral victory on Thursday in a landslide not seen since Margaret Thatcher’s win in 1987. Conservatives won seats in British working-class districts that have been Labour strongholds for generations, giving Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party its biggest defeat since 1935. What can 2020 Democratic presidential candidates learn from this election? 

The Connecticut Supreme Court ruled Thursday morning that voters cannot sue to overturn the results of an election. The decision ends a months-long legal battle between three voters and the City of Bridgeport. 

Between possible foreign interference, potentially record-high turnout, new voting equipment in many parts of the country and what could be a razor-close outcome, the 2020 election was already shaping up to be one of the most challenging elections to administer in U.S. history.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Secretary of the State Denise Merrill randomly drew names of voting precincts from a lottery machine on Wednesday, revealing the polling places that will be subject to an audit for the 2019 municipal election.

A controversial new residency law in New Hampshire is creating confusion, and has led to charges of voter suppression and a legal challenge.

Backers say the law clarifies the state’s voting rules and brings New Hampshire in line with all other states, but opponents say it is a blatant effort by Republicans to block college students who hail from other states from voting.

Chion Wolf

During presidential election years, a majority of Americans vote. According to the United States Elections Project, about 60% of eligible voters cast ballots in the 2016 election. 

In New England, percentages vary by state, with Maine and New Hampshire at the high end with just above 70% casting ballots, and Rhode Island at the low end, matching the national average. But no matter how you break it down, the reality is a lot of people are choosing not to vote.

Sacred Heart University students say they experienced what the university calls “borderline voter suppression” at polling places in Bridgeport yesterday.

Are there any lessons we can learn from last night? Probably not. The predicted trends, like “The Trump Effect” didn’t really emerge. The state was split between Republican and Democratic victories.

Updated at 2:45 a.m. ET Wednesday

Democrats had a strong election night on Tuesday, leading the race for governor in Kentucky and taking back full control of the Virginia legislature for the first time in nearly a quarter century.

Will There Be A Trump Factor Today In Connecticut?

Nov 5, 2019
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Today’s municipal elections feature unusual bids for redemption by losers of Democratic primaries in two of the state’s largest cities, as Marilyn Moore attempts a write-in campaign to unseat Joseph P. Ganim in Bridgeport and Mayor Toni N. Harp continues as a third-party candidate following her decisive loss to Justin Elicker in September.

Supreme Court Declines To Stop Bridgeport Election

Nov 4, 2019
Connecticut Supreme Court Justice Richard N. Palmer and Chief Justice Richard A. Robinson listen to arguments before the court decided to allow elections to proceed in Bridgeport tomorrow. At issue is the validity of the results of September's primary in
Mark Mirko / Hartford Courant

The Connecticut Supreme Court declined Monday to postpone Tuesday’s mayoral election in Bridgeport over allegations of absentee ballot fraud in the Democratic primary, while leaving open the possibility the court might use the case to eventually clarify standards for challenging suspect election results.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Tuesday, November 5 is Election Day in Connecticut. This means another opportunity for residents to cast ballots for town and city officials. But who will turn out to the polls?

This hour, we check in with reporters and analysts from across the state, and we also hear from you. Will you vote this Election Day? Why or why not?

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Tuesday was the deadline in Connecticut to register to vote before Election Day, Nov. 5. If you happened to miss the deadline and still want to exercise your democratic rights, don’t despair.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

A new candidate who has just entered the mayoral race in Bridgeport could cause confusion at the ballot box November 5. The issue centers on whether marking the candidate's initials on a ballot to indicate a write-in vote will be enough.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The language of politics--of America, really--has gotten quite a bit uglier over the last few years. And the last few weeks in Connecticut are a case in point. Female political leaders from both major parties faced online insults and threats, and prompted a call from the governor and others for a more civil tone.

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Not all of the presidential campaigning this primary season is on the Democratic side. A few Republicans are challenging President Trump. One who’s best known to New England is Bill Weld, former governor of Massachusetts.

Weld is fiscally conservative and socially liberal. He ran for Vice President as a Liberatarian in 2016, and he says that’s the sort of thing that plays well among New England voters. He’s trailing Trump badly in the polls, but is spending a lot of time in New Hampshire talking to voters about issues like immigration and climate change.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

An elections official in Coventry could soon be the subject of a state investigation.

Records Subpoenaed In Bridgeport Mayoral Primary

Sep 23, 2019
Gemeem Davis, the manager of the Marilyn Moore campaign, center, and Max Medina, at right, the campaign's lawyer.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

With unanimous votes to subpoena election records and other evidence, the State Elections Enforcement Commission opened an investigation Monday into allegations of voter fraud in the Bridgeport mayoral primary won Mayor Joseph P. Ganim on the strength of a lopsided absentee ballot vote. 

Can Marilyn Moore Duplicate Mike Jarjura’s Write-in Win?

Sep 19, 2019

State Sen. Marilyn Moore’s decision to continue her mayoral campaign against Bridgeport Mayor Joseph P. Ganim as a write-in candidate puts her on a path that is extraordinarily difficult — but not wholly uncharted in Connecticut. 

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