Department of Education | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

Department of Education

Bus Company First Student Gets $7M For Not Driving Kids

Jun 30, 2020
Sam Gurwitt / New Haven Independent

New Haven will pay its school bus contractor $1.5 million less than normal for time the buses were idle during the pandemic — but more than they should, according to some Board of Education members.

State Releases Plan To Return Students To School

Jun 29, 2020
June 25, 2020: Governor Ned Lamont walks through baggage claim at Bradley International Airport about on his way to speak about new quarantine procedures for travelers coming to Connecticut from some states with high infection rates.
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

The state released requirements and guidance Monday for local districts to open schools this fall as COVID-19 hospitalizations in the state fell under 100 for the first time in months. 

Connecticut Orders Schools To Reopen In Fall, Teachers Are Concerned

Jun 25, 2020
School buses parked in Hartford on Thursday, June 25.
Yehyun Kim / CTMirror.org

Connecticut schools will reopen for a five-day school week in the fall – as long as the coronavirus behaves, Gov. Ned Lamont announced Thursday.

Governor Ned Lamont speaks at Bradley International Airport about new quarantine procedures for travelers coming to Connecticut from some states with high infection rates.
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

The school year may have just ended, but plans are taking shape for the return of students inside schools this fall. Gov. Ned Lamont announced the plans Thursday, noting that several COVID-19 trends are holding steady in Connecticut while the virus continues to spread in other parts of the country.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

The federal government has sided with a group of Connecticut athletes who have sued the state’s governing body of high school sports over the inclusion of transgender athletes in girls events.

Hartford High School
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Gov. Ned Lamont on Tuesday officially canceled in-person schooling for Connecticut students for the rest of the 2019-20 academic year.

Lamont Orders Connecticut Schools Closed For The Academic Year

May 5, 2020
Governor Ned Lamont
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Gov. Ned Lamont will order K-12 schools throughout Connecticut to stay closed for the remainder of the academic year because of the health threat posed by COVID-19.

Lamont To Keep Schools Closed Until May 20, Maybe Longer

Apr 9, 2020
coronavirus testing
Chloe Poisson / CT Mirror

While the latest statistics from around Connecticut offer “slight glimmers of hope” that the coronavirus pandemic may be easing, Gov. Ned Lamont warned Thursday that schools and most small businesses must remain closed for at least another month to prevent any resurgence of the deadly virus.

Connecticut Virus Deaths Rising, And Lamont Expects Schools To Remain Closed Until Fall

Mar 24, 2020
Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

The number of confirmed coronavirus infections in Connecticut jumped by more than 200 cases overnight, while officials Tuesday confirmed a new hotspot at a Ridgefield senior living center and announced the virus has infiltrated the state’s main psychiatric hospital.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s Department of Education said it’s ready to help school districts take in Puerto Rican students evacuated from the island because of recent earthquakes.

Pixabay.com

More than 4 million people, around 1 out of 5 undergrads, are raising children today. That’s according to the U.S. Department of Education. These student parents tend to have higher GPAs than traditional students. They’re often older, single, and women of color. But more than half of them leave school without getting a degree. 

rashida s. mar b. / Flickr Creative Commons

The stereotypes around homeschooling have existed for decades. Since the modern homeschooling movement began in the late 20th century, those who favored this educational approach have largely been perceived as white, anti-establishment, radically Christian, and ultra-conservative.

StanfordEdTech / Creative Commons

The state announced Friday nearly $26 million in federal funds will go toward higher education readiness programs for low-income students. That money will be dispersed over the next seven years to support tutoring, mentoring, and college scholarships.

Miguel Cardona
Courtesy: NEAG School of Education, UConn

At 27, he was a Connecticut school principal. At 44, he is the state’s commissioner of education.

This hour, Dr. Miguel Cardona joins us to talk about his vision for Connecticut's education future. 

Miguel Cardona
Courtesy: NEAG School of Education, UConn

The State Board of Education voted six to one Thursday to endorse Gov. Ned Lamont’s selection of Miguel Cardona, Meriden’s assistant superintendent, as the state’s next education commission. 

State Changes Course On Education Commissioner

Jul 17, 2019
Miguel Cardona
Courtesy: NEAG School of Education, UConn

In a dramatic reversal, Miguel Cardona, an assistant superintendent in Meriden, is expected to be chosen as Connecticut’s next state education commissioner, rather than Bloomfield Superintendent James Thompson, sources close to the search committee said Tuesday. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

A new education bill seeks to add African-American studies to the social studies curriculum in Connecticut public schools. High school students testifying before the legislature this week said loud and clear that Black history is more than just Rosa Parks, slavery and civil rights.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Advanced Placement test scores continue to rise in Connecticut, as does the number of students taking them.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The state of Connecticut has set aside $1.5 million to meet the needs of Puerto Rican evacuees and the Connecticut municipalities that took them in for the current fiscal year.

Lori Mack / WNPR

Educators, administrators, parents and students have called on Connecticut legislators to finalize a budget. They met to highlight their concerns after the education commissioner’s annual back-to-school meeting in Meriden Tuesday.

rashida s. mar b. / flickr

The stereotypes around homeschooling have existed for decades. Since the modern homeschooling movement began in the late 20th century, those who favored this educational approach have largely been perceived as white, anti-establishment, radically Christian, and ultra-conservative.

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

Most Connecticut schools have access to a track when they practice. The Academy of Science and Innovation, a CREC magnet school in New Britain, doesn’t.

CTN

East Hartford officials want Education Secretary Betsy DeVos to visit the town’s school system, after she made controversial comments last week criticizing its standards. DeVos accused East Hartford High School of being what she termed a “dangerous daycare,” citing one of its former students. 

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

It was 1st-and-10 from the Capital Prep 39-yard line. There were under four minutes left in the opening quarter of a 2014 Connecticut High School Football championship game. North Branford had the ball, up 7-6.

www.audio-luci-store.it / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s Sheff magnet system is back in the spotlight -- this time, for reports of questionable admissions practices.

This hour: hand-picked or luck of the draw? We find out how some Hartford-area schools have been skirting around the state’s lottery process

A residency requirement for college students seeking free tuition at New York’s public colleges is drawing criticism. Governor Cuomo defends the late addition to the plan, approved as part of the state budget earlier this month.

US Department of Education / Creative Commons

Billionaire Betsy DeVos is the new Secretary for the US Department of Education.

This hour, how will she impact public school education nationwide including here in Connecticut? We hear from educators within traditional public and charter schools — and we want to hear from you, too.

Today the Senate confirmed Betsy DeVos as President Trump's education secretary, 51-50.

Senate Democrats held an all-night session Monday night into Tuesday morning in a last-ditch effort to try to stop President Trump's nominee for secretary of education, Betsy DeVos, from being confirmed.

Among those who took to the floor was Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, who said it was "difficult to imagine a worse choice to head the Department of Education."

There hasn't been a more controversial pick for secretary of education, arguably, in recent memory than Donald Trump's choice of Betsy DeVos. The Senate confirmation hearings for the billionaire Republican fundraiser and activist from Michigan start today.

Pages