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Department of Correction

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Before the Hartford Reentry Welcome Center opened, people in the city fresh out of prison didn’t have one central place where they could find housing, counseling or even a clean, safe place to use the bathroom. Now, they do. The center - located in City Hall -  is a partnership between Community Partners in Action, the City of Hartford, the Department of Corrections and more than 40 local organizations.

Jenn Vargas / Flickr

Today, we take a look at a series of disturbing cases of alleged medical malpractice of inmates incarcerated in Connecticut.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: we sit-down with Connecticut Department of Correction Commissioner Scott Semple. In recent months, Semple’s agency has garnered statewide attention -- specifically with regard to reports involving prison health care and security.

We take a closer look at those issues and talk more broadly about trends within Connecticut's prison system.

Do you have a question or comment for Commissioner Semple? We want to hear from you. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Authorities say a missing inmate who escaped from the Carl Robinson Correctional Institution in Enfield may have stowed away under a state service vehicle or garbage truck.

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Layoff notices continue to be issued to Connecticut state employees.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

In December, the Commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Correction captured the attention of criminal justice reform advocates with a proposal for a new facility solely for 18-to-25-year-olds. It's part of a string of initiatives under the leadership of Scott Semple.

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Lawmakers are considering a bill that would limit the use of seclusion and restraints to individuals aged 20 or older at facilities run by the Departments of Correction and Children and Families.

Thomas Hawk / Creative Commons

Connecticut's Department of Correction is changing the way it rewards prison inmates for good behavior.

Thomas Hawk /thomashawk / Flickr

Connecticut state police and the Department of Correction said they are investigating the death of an inmate at the York Correctional Institution in Niantic as a possible suicide.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In 2011, the state adopted a Risk Reduction Earned Credit, or RREC program, where certain prisoners can have their sentences reduced by participating in prison programs, and for good behavior. RREC has been controversial, but new statistics show the program has been effective in reducing recidivism rates.

Kudumomo / Creative Commons

Attorneys for the transgender juvenile at a Connecticut women's prison say the Department of Correction will not transfer the teen to Manson Correctional Institution, a male facility.

Aaron Romano, who is representing the juvenile in federal court, is working with the DOC on a plan that he hopes will be more rehabilitative, despite the fact the 16-year-old is in a correctional adult facility.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

 Wally Lamb, the best-selling author, advocate for female prisoners, and frequent contributor to The Colin McEnroe Show, reported last night that the Connecticut Department of Corrections had banned his book "She's Come Undone" and put "I'll Fly Away" on an "endangered list."  

Then we got this statement from the State Department of Correction less than a day after the news broke: 

A habeas corpus trial involving seven death row inmates is scheduled to take place in Connecticut in the coming weeks. The logistics of the trial have been complex.

Connecticut abolished the death penalty earlier this year, but the new law is prospective, affecting only future crimes. It leaves in place the sentences of eleven inmates currently on death row.