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Coronavirus

Governor Ned Lamont
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

The school year may have just ended, but plans are taking shape for the return of students inside schools this fall. Gov. Ned Lamont announced the plans Thursday, noting that several COVID-19 trends are holding steady in Connecticut while the virus continues to spread in other parts of the country.

Bradley Airport
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

The state’s travel advisory to visitors from coronavirus hot spots took effect Thursday.

Gov. Ned Lamont and his counterparts from New Jersey and New York say that a visit from areas with high infection rates requires a 14-day self-quarantine.

But the way Lamont was talking as he spoke Thursday from Bradley International Airport, self-quarantine is more of a recommendation than a requirement.

spring cleanup
Ali Warshavsky / Connecticut Public Radio

Amid what amounts to a new civil rights movement, Black-owned businesses in Fairfield County say they are feeling the support of the community in ways they never have. And that boost comes in the wake of the devastating pandemic shutdowns that hit minority businesses harder than most. 

Hartford Stage
Courtesy Hartford Stage

Three months of COVID-related measures continue to take their toll on arts and culture organizations in the state. The prolonged closure of Connecticut’s performing arts venues and museums has cost those organizations nearly $29 million, according to the national arts advocacy organization Americans for the Arts. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Faced with a massive deficit -- only exacerbated by the economic pain of coronavirus shutdowns -- the University of Connecticut’s athletics department is making cuts.

coronavirus testing
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

Connecticut is paying more than half a dozen outside vendors to test people for the coronavirus. But state officials are redacting the contracts that spell out how much taxpayers are paying for each test because the vendors say those prices are trade secrets.

The Office of the State Comptroller has redacted at least six public contracts at the request of vendors who say their prices for a budgeted $50 million in taxpayer-funded tests shouldn’t be publicly disclosed.

a closed sign
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The economy has been thrown into turmoil by the coronavirus pandemic, but predicting the longer-term effects of the downturn can be a tricky business. U.S. consumer spending was up a record 18% in May, despite the fact that unemployment remains in double digits. So how do we chart the future now that the pandemic has changed everything?

DMV Reopens With COVID-Inspired Changes

Jun 23, 2020
Welcome to the DMV: Cynthia Brown greeted customers by taking their temperature and quizzing them about COVID-19 symptoms.
Yehyun Kim / CTMirror.org

The new COVID-ready Department of Motor Vehicles opened for license and registration renewals Tuesday, and the long-awaited first look at how public schools will operate in the fall will come Thursday.

In New England, Declining Car Sales Prompt Call For Electric Bike Rebates

Jun 23, 2020
Richard Masoner / Flickr Creative Commons

As interest in cycling rises and electric vehicle sales drop off amid the pandemic, advocates are calling on Connecticut officials to extend the state’s rebate program to include electric bicycles.

Bob Jagendorf

Pride Month is looking a little different this year. Traditionally, Pride is marked by big parades and celebrations. But social distancing and racial unrest means that celebrations won't look the same as they did years prior. This hour, we discuss how the Connecticut LGBTQ community is celebrating this year.

UConn Students Contemplate Life Back On Campus

Jun 22, 2020
Jackson Mitchell / WNPR

The University of Connecticut plans on having students back on campus for classes in the fall, after students were sent home in March to shelter during the coronavirus pandemic.

But the announcement of a return to campus life is drawing mixed reactions.

AP Photo/Eric Gay

The NBA could get an assist from Yale University in monitoring the spread of COVID-19 when its season resumes.

Yale’s School of Public Health has announced that select NBA players, coaches and staff will take part in the university’s efforts to determine whether saliva testing for COVID-19 is effective. 

Brownstone Exploration & Discovery Park Portland
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Connecticut, New York and New Jersey officials are now considering imposing a self-testing or quarantining order on people coming in from other areas of the U.S. with high COVID-19 infection rates, Gov. Ned Lamont said Monday.

About 120,000 Americans have now died from the coronavirus.

Ryan Martins / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s been a school year like no other. Once the coronavirus hit, schools across Connecticut and around the country had to adapt to distance learning for a large part of this academic year.  

Naugatuck High School moved its entire curriculum online.

Senate Dems Want Broad Social Justice Agenda For July Session, Others Say There Isn't Time

Jun 19, 2020
Senator Doug McCrory, D-Hartford, (at podium) discusses broad agenda to combat systemic racism during Friday’s press conference. Sen. Gary Winfield, D-New Haven, is on left.
CTMirror.org

Majority Senate Democrats unveiled a comprehensive platform Friday to reverse systemic racial inequalities in law enforcement, health care, housing, education and economic opportunity.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

State officials have announced that they’re scaling back COVID-19 testing at nursing homes and assisted living facilities. It’s a policy shift that comes as a major union representing eldercare workers said 14 of its members died after contracting COVID-19. 

Lamont Backs GOP Plan For $450 Back-To-Work Incentive

Jun 18, 2020
Gov. Ned Lamont
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Gov. Ned Lamont came out Thursday in favor of a Republican congressional plan to pay a one-time $450 stipend to people who return to work rather than extending a federal program that provides $600 a week in added jobless benefits.

Quinnipiac University
Wikimedia Commons

The financial impact of COVID-19 continues to wreak havoc on university budgets. This week, Quinnipiac University announced it will lay off or furlough nearly 170 employees due to the pandemic. 

Picasa / Google

Scientists say humans don't know how to breathe very well. We don't breathe deep enough, we breathe too much, and we breathe through our mouths instead of our noses. Our bad breathing can lead to conditions that we don't typically associate with the way we breathe, such as asthma.  

Meli-Melo Creperie Juice Bar & Cafe reopening connecticut phase two
Mark Lennihan / AP Photo

Some Connecticut businesses and organizations were allowed to open back up under the second phase of Gov. Ned Lamont’s reopening plan Wednesday -- but many did not. Amusement parks, health centers, libraries and movie theaters have announced opening dates for later in June or even this summer. 

First And Last Tavern
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

First came the return of outdoor dining at Connecticut restaurants, and now the state is allowing indoor dining.

It’s part of Phase 2 of the state’s reopening from what was essentially an economic shutdown due to the coronavirus outbreak.

Courtesy: Madina Mamadjonova

As COVID-19 continues to spread in ICE detention facilities, researchers are raising concerns that the agency may not be accurately reporting infections and deaths from the virus.

One Connecticut man who has been deemed medically vulnerable remains inside an Alabama detention center. 

face mask
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Denise Rogers said all she did was get up and go to work. A few days later, she was hospitalized and her husband of more than 20 years was dead. 

Oakville Restaurant Surviving Pandemic Debut

Jun 16, 2020
Olivia Hickey / Connecticut Public Radio

While many restaurants worried about keeping their doors open during the coronavirus pandemic, one Oakville restaurant was opening its doors for the first time. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

One day before the state embarks on the second phase of its business reopenings, Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont said Tuesday that state COVID-19 public health numbers continue their positive trend. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Connecticut has been running more COVID-19 tests in recent weeks, but the state’s testing volume is still far short of Gov. Ned Lamont’s goal for Phase 2 of Connecticut’s reopening, which is scheduled for Wednesday.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

A greater portion of COVID-19 tests have come back negative in Connecticut compared with other states, which the Governor’s team says is a good sign.

But who should be getting tested as the state rolls out its phase two reopening on Wednesday?

This hour, we talk with Governor Lamont’s Chief Operating Officer Josh Geballe about this latest phase of reopening Connecticut's economy. And we hear from Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin about the state's latest testing guidance for city residents. We ask: should asymptomatic people get a COVID-19 test?

Later in the hour, we also hear a story from Connecticut Public reporter Frankie Graziano, about grieving the loss of a loved one during a pandemic.

Blame Luck Or Safety Protocols, But Some Nursing Homes Remain COVID-19 Free

Jun 16, 2020
Jay Katz
Melanie Stengel / Connecticut Health I-Team

The coronavirus has decimated many of the nation’s nursing homes, where elderly, chronically ill residents account for 64% of Connecticut’s death toll of 4,201 and rising. They are roughly 100 times more likely to die of the virus than other people in the state.

self-isolation connecticut
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

COVID-19 has brought death much closer to everyday life for many in Connecticut and around the world. But it’s also had a big impact on how we memorialize and mourn the dead.

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