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Connecticut legislature

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Women won big in these 2018 Connecticut midterm elections. This follows a national trend sparked in response to the 2016 election of Donald Trump. More women ran and more women won, many in seats not held by a Democrat in decades, let alone by a woman. 

Today, an hour with several of Connecticut's new female legislators. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Upstart candidates like Connecticut's Jahana Hayes played a big role in Democrats regaining control of the U.S. House of Representatives in Tuesday's election. Hayes' victory over Republican opponent Manny Santos also kept the GOP locked out of the state's congressional delegation yet again.

Democrats Make Solid Gains In General Assembly

Nov 6, 2018
Adavyd / Creative Commons

Democrats made their first state legislative gains in 10 years Tuesday night, breaking an 18-18 tie in the Senate by picking up three Republican seats and defending vulnerable Democratic lawmakers who were targeted by the GOP. 

Mark Goebel / Creative Commons

We have a tradition on the show of celebrating voting and the people who vote by speaking to thoughtful "citizen observers" from around the state about their experience of voting on this Election Day. 

Theresa Thompson / Creative Commons

It's almost over. One more day of lawn signs, robocalls, nasty mailers and deceptive commercials. Election Day is upon us and is shaping up to bring an unprecedented number of voters to the polls.  

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

Which party can get to 19?

That's the number of Connecticut Senate seats that Republicans or Democrats need to win on Nov. 6 to control the legislature's upper chamber.

Right now, it's an 18-18 split. But a national Republican-funded super PAC is spending large sums of money in an attempt to change that.

In the state House of Representatives, the GOP needs just five more seats to gain the majority for the first time since 1984.

Jiri Nedorost / Creative Commons

Whether for sport or sustenance; by rifle or crossbow, hunting has long been a part of the human experience.

This hour, we look back on our relationship with hunting and consider what it means to hunt today.

Are you a hunter? We want to hear from you. 

Max Moran / Connecticut Public Radio

The firestorm in Washington, D.C., over the sexual misconduct charges leveled against U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is tearing its way through New Haven too.

Both Kavanaugh and his latest accuser, Deborah Ramirez, attended Yale together in the 1980s. As Ramirez tells it, the lecherous behavior came during a dorm party at the university and was fueled by heavy drinking. 

thetruthpreneur / Creative Commons

The National Council for Adoption has reported a decline in U.S. intercountry adoptions since the year 2004.

This hour, we discuss the factors driving this downward shift and consider how it compares to trends in the adoption of children born domestically.

We also hear from two Connecticut residents with unique adoption experiences -- one as an adoptive father, the other as an adopted son.

If you have an adoption story you want to share, we want to hear from you, too.

CTMirror.org

In recent days, Republican gubernatorial nominee Bob Stefanowski has ratcheted up the pleas for campaign donations. If more money doesn't come in quickly, he may be forced to curtail his television advertising blitz, Stefanowski's wife warned in an email to supporters.

This week, ahead of the first debate between the two major party candidates Wednesday night, we evaluate how Stefanowski and Democrat Ned Lamont are doing at this critical stage of the race, both financially and otherwise. Will the constant barrage of attack ads, from both sides, continue?

Connecticut Has A Surplus - For Now

Aug 20, 2018
Office of Policy and Management Secretary Ben Barnes
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

State government’s new budget year is off to a healthy start, but there’s good news and bad news in the numbers.

Primary Upsets On The Menu For August 14?

Aug 8, 2018
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

In this last week before the August 14 party primaries, the debates, and endorsements--not to mention those tree-killing mailers clogging our post office boxes--are coming fast and furious.

Here's a sample of the questions we're contemplating at this critical stage:

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state bond commission approved funding for a $10 million study of road tolls Wednesday.

Paolo Zialcita / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut has become the first state in the nation to officially observe Sikh Genocide Remembrance Day. The day honors the lives lost during anti-Sikh riots in India in the 1980s.

George W Bush Presidential Library / Creative Commons

Connecticut will hold primaries on August 14 to determine which candidates get on the ballot in this November's midterm elections. Since Connecticut runs a closed primary system, only voters registered with a party get to vote in that party's primary. Unaffiliated and Independent voters are out of luck.

CTMirror.org

Politics is definitely not for the squeamish. And this year's race for governor is only going to get nastier now that two of the three Republican hopefuls seeking public campaign financing have money to buy television ads to compete against their wealthy, self-funding GOP and Democratic rivals.

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

The Connecticut state Senate failed to override a veto by Governor Dannel Malloy on legislation that would have allowed teachers to remove disruptive or violent students from their classroom.

Bob Adelman / Free the Beaches: The Story of Ned Coll and the Battle for America’s Most Exclusive Shoreline

This Memorial Day weekend, Connecticut residents will flock to the shoreline, raising umbrellas and spreading towels along the state's beaches.

Yet, behind this sunny imagery hides a somber history -- a story of coastal ownership and exclusivity.

This hour, University of Virginia professor and Free the Beaches author Andrew Kahrl joins us. We reflect on the impact of Connecticut’s private and restricted beaches and learn about a 20th-century crusade to unlock the state’s coast. 

Marit & Toomas Hinnosaar (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Governor Dannel Malloy may call the legislature back into special session to deal with sports gambling now that the Supreme Court has given states the go-ahead to legalize betting on sports. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Which Republican candidates are heading to primaries or the general election? We talk with Christine Stuart, editor of CTNewsJunkie.com about the state GOP convention. And she tells us what state lawmakers did—and didn’t—accomplish during this legislative session.

Malloy Delivers A Funny Farewell In Midnight Address

May 10, 2018
Gov. Dannel P. Malloy closes his last legislative session.
Clarice Silber / CT Mirror

With a self-deprecating humor, Gov. Dannel P. Malloy addressed a joint convention of the General Assembly for the last time early Thursday, celebrating accomplishments of the past eight years and wryly acknowledging that he will leave politics as one of the least popular governors in the U.S.

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

There are just a few frenetic hours left in the 2018 legislative session. The fate of many controversial bills will be decided between now and when state lawmakers adjourn Wednesday at the stroke of midnight.

What's next for those still dreaming of a Bridgeport casino? Will labor unions be rejoicing over a minimum wage increase? Will a budget deal be brokered on time this year?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

With a Wednesday deadline looming, Democratic leaders in the General Assembly say they are hopeful a bipartisan agreement can be reached on the second year of the two-year budget. Leaders of both parties are meeting in the first cross-party talks Tuesday.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A House bill to provide state aid for evacuees from Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands is being held back by its sponsors. The move is being made because it likely wouldn’t have made it out of the appropriations committee.

A polling place on Election Day 2017 in Waterbury.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The state Senate passed a bill Saturday committing Connecticut to the effort supporting a national popular vote for the United States presidency.

Bridgeport Casino, Hartford Debt Aid Complicate Connecticut Budget Talks

May 4, 2018
Connecticut State Capitol
Jim Bowen / Creative Commons

With just five days left in the legislative session, a stubborn wrinkle is complicating efforts to craft a new state budget: regional politics.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

With Jonathan Harris dropping out of the governor's race and throwing his support behind Ned Lamont, the stars seem to be aligning for the Greenwich cable television entrepreneur to capture the Democratic Party's endorsement at its May 18-19 state convention.

Susan Bysiewicz
Chion Wolf

What moves do you make to break out of the pack in what's been a governor's race without any indisputable front-runners? If you're Susan Bysiewicz, you call out wealthy, largely self-funding fellow Democratic rival Ned Lamont for not participating in the state's public campaign finance system, which restricts candidate spending.

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

A survey on sexual harassment was handed out Wednesday to anyone who works at the state Capitol, including lobbyists and state legislators.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The crowded race for governor finally began to narrow this week as Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin announced he is abandoning his bid to be the Democratic Party's nominee.

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