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The first anniversary of the massacre at the Sandy Hook Elementary School is just days away. As the community braces itself, it's also asking the members of the media to do its job, and then leave as soon as possible. 

Residents of Newtown, Conn., have decided against a public commemoration to mark the first anniversary this coming Saturday of the shooting at the Sandy Hook Elementary School, which left 20 first graders and six educators dead.

Instead, the town is endorsing a “year of service” and is asking residents to put a candle in their window on Dec. 14, the day of the shooting, to show their commitment to the idea of service to each other.

Relatives of those killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School have asked people to mark Saturday's anniversary of the mass shooting with "acts of kindness" and say they will light candles in memory of the victims.

At a news conference on Monday, the families also announced the launch of a website, http://mysandyhookfamily.org, to create a "singular place of sharing, communication, and contact with the families of those who lost their lives that day."

Ray Hardman / WNPR

In December 2011, the popular Norfolk Curling Club was destroyed by a fire. After months of fundraising and planning, the curling club celebrates the grand opening of their new facility this weekend. 

John Phelan / Creative Commons

General Electric has donated $15 million to Newtown to build and operate a community center. Town officials said that following the shooting deaths last December of 20 children and six educators at the Sandy Hook Elementary School, it was clear the town lacked a central meeting space.

Start Bank

The end of an era in New Haven finally seemed like reality last week as Toni Harp won election to the mayor's office. The man she's replacing, John DeStefano, is following 20 years at the head of city government with another prominent role in New Haven. He'll become an executive at New Haven's Start Bank.

Demolition has begun at Sandy Hook Elementary School, where a gunman killed 20 students and six adults last December. Bricks will be pulverized, steel melted down and a new school built at the same location.

Allison Hornak attended Sandy Hook Elementary School as a kid. After college, she returned home to Newtown, Conn., and opened an art gallery that's within walking distance of where the mass killing took place.

Hornak says she has a lot of fond memories of Sandy Hook — like a teacher who let her chew gum in class, and the pathways through the school.

Ray Hardman / WNPR

A coalition of Connecticut anti-gun and peace groups gathered in Hartford on Wednesday. The goal of the conference was to come together as a unified voice for peace and safety. The first-of-its-kind conference brought together representatives from 30 anti-gun and peace groups from around the state, just as Newtown is beginning demolition of the Sandy Hook Elementary School

Josiah Mackenzie / Flickr Creative Commons

Thousands of runners are expected to participate in Saturday’s ING Hartford marathon (or half-marathon). Among them will be 26 members of Newtown’s 12/14 Foundation Marathon Team. They want to bring attention to their mission: to build a landmark performing arts center in memory of the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting.

Johnathon Henninger

After a nearly decade long presence in Hartford's Frog Hollow neighborhood, a popular coffee shop and community hub closed its doors at the end of June. WNPR's J Holt brings us its story.

 

The story of the closing of La Paloma Sabanera Coffee House is a hard one to tell right. There's the recession, controversy over the new Hartford busway, an absentee landlord and a difficult rent negotiation, and even some tough winter weather. 

Sandy Hook Center Coming Back To Life

Jun 18, 2013

For months after the Newtown school shootings last December, area shops and restaurants struggled to find customers in the Sandy Hook neighborhood. That trend may finally be reversing as a number of new businesses open up.

I’m standing at the doorway of Foundry Kitchen and Grill, a new restaurant in the Newtown neighborhood of Sandy Hook. Back in March this place was still under construction. Now, it’s buzzing with diners, even during lunch hour in a district that’s lost one of its major daytime customer bases: Sandy Hook Elementary School. 

Back in the early 2000s, a group of mostly low-income African- American families took the city of New Haven to court. They were fighting to stay in their homes which were slated for demolition in order to build a new school complex. A documentary film airing tonight on CPTV tells their story.

"My house is paid for. I’ll never have to pay another mortgage no more in life. It's not much, but its mine."

Agelessness

May 13, 2013
Peter Løvstrøm/flickr creative commons

What does it mean to be ageless, no matter how young or old you are? Do you have parents or grandparents who want to be independent even in old age? Don't miss our story on the village-to-village network spreading across our region and the country. How to help your family age in place, and how to volunteer from village to village. Bruce Clements also talks about whether being ageless is a goal that makes any sense for anybody at any age.

Remixing Middletown

May 10, 2013

Middletown is gearing up for a special celebration Saturday.

The city's north end will will come alive with music, dancers and visual art Saturday. MiddletownRemix: Hear More, See More is a festival of Art and Sound that features a flash mob dance, a laptop computer Orchestra, and a host of other events.

Connecticut Libraries Creating Community

Apr 30, 2013
Catie Talarski

Libraries might be changing faster than just about any other part of public life. These civic institutions were known for more than a century for their voluminous stacks of books and quiet spaces - now, they’re all about public events, high-tech connectivity, even 3-D printing!

Sean Mack, Wikimedia Commons

Connecticut’s recovery has been marked by persistent high unemployment. But many employers are starting to complain that they can’t find the skilled workers they need. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan asks – is that because they aren’t out there, or could it be that they’re just hard to find?

Harriet Jones

The Malloy administration has made an explicit effort to change Connecticut’s reputation as a state that’s unfriendly to business. To that end, 2011’s Jobs Bill offered loans and tax incentives to companies already hard at work in the state. One of those programs might be about to become a victim of its own success. As WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports, the Job Expansion Tax Credit might have more takers than the state has dollars.

 

 

 

Marcin Wichary/flickr creative commons

Caroline Rob Zaleski’s research on the work of key figures in twentieth-century architecture, the relatively unknown aspects of their production, and their associations with clients, artists, and politicians chronicles a rich and little-known array of architecture on Long Island, a hotbed of modernism from the 1930s on. Zaleski documents the development of exurbia and the rise of visionary structures: residences for commuters and weekenders, public housing, houses of worship, universities, shopping centers, and office complexes, and she is our guest.

Shane Pope (Flickr Creative Commons)

In New Haven, as city workers and the National Guard work to clear the streets, a website has been organizing residents willing to chip in and help.

On the night of the blizzard, SeeClickFix.com's CEO Ben Berkowitz took a ride in an emergency vehicle with a New Haven city official and it became clear to him that this storm, in the short term, would cripple the Elm City.

alancleaver_2000 / Creative Commons

Connecticut residents will have to start paying sales tax on purchases from Amazon.com later this year. As WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports, the web giant has plans to site a distribution facility in the state.

A report released Friday says more than 720,000 people are living at or near the poverty level in Connecticut.

Courtesy of FuelCell Energy, Inc.

The Danbury-based FuelCell Energy Inc. recently announced plans to go forward with construction in nearby Bridgeport, Conn. of what will be North America's largest fuel cell. 

Covering a space less than two acres, the plant will produce 15 megawatts of electricity from natural gas provided by the Connecticut utility company United Illuminating. The electricity, which will be enough to power 15,000 homes, will then be sold to Connecticut Light & Power.

WalkBikeTransit New Haven

The winter streets of New Haven will get a little more colorful in January. Thousands of hand-made butterflies will be dispersed throughout the city in a massive outdoor art installation, and the public is being asked to get involved.

WNPR's Ray Hardman spoke recently with Chris Schweitzer from WalkBikeTransit New Haven, the organization sponsoring the butterfly art installation project. Chris is program director for the New Haven/Leon Sister City Project.

Sending Season’s Greetings

Dec 21, 2012

Holiday greetings have been around almost as long as the Christmas holiday itself, in the form of sermons, almanac entries, poems, and books for children, even notes attached to bills and receipts.  In the 1840s, people were given another way to express good will to their neighbors through the Christmas card.  Changes in postal charges made the sending of specific cards for specific holidays easier.

Harriet Jones

A small Middletown company is about to double its workforce, as it signs a huge European export contract. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

“This is our demonstration room. So you’ll see the flags. All these flags represent countries that we’ve installed equipment to…”

Gerard Fenerty is something of a world traveler. In recent years he’s collected more than a few airmiles.

“First one was in El Salvador and the United Kingdom. Then we did business in Venezuela and Colombia. And we did a number of other countries in Europe – Germany, France, Belgium, Denmark…”

(I)NTERVIEW - Steve Perry

Dec 19, 2012
Frank Wallace

“I'm unapologetic for our success because I know at the root of our success is a deep love for children. We come to win at everything we do. you can get on our team or you can be on the other team, I prefer winning, I'll stay with us.” These words, were spoken by educator Dr. Steve Perry in this exclusive CPBN Media Lab (I)NTERVIEW.

Chion Wolf photo

What are the right questions to ask after the shooting? What do we do now, after the violence in Sandy Hook, CT. We can't get to the right path without asking the right questions. Is there a way to make sense of any of this, to find one path out of this? Or does it require careful thought, planning, and action across years? We begin with what are the questions for us to consider?

Harriet Jones

The Malloy administration has made a big commitment to nurture manufacturing in Connecticut, despite the fall off in employment in the sector over a period of decades. Are they right to place so much faith in making things here?  A new analysis attempts to answer that question.

The Naugatuck River Valley is one of the great seats of Connecticut’s manufacturing history. And Bill Purcell, president of the Valley Chamber of Commerce says that’s still relevant today.

Courtesy of CTIAHS.COM

Several people are working to create an Irish Heritage Trail in Connecticut. WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil spoke to Pat Heslin. She's a member of the CT Irish American Historical Society and heading up the project after receiving a $15,000 grant from the Department of Economic and Community Development.

Listen to the interview by clicking the audio link on the left side of the page. 

You can learn more about the CT Irish American Historical Society and plans for the Heritage Trail here

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