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Jeff Cohen / WNPR

No one wants the city of Hartford to declare bankruptcy. Still, it’s an option that -- given the depth of the capital city’s financial distress -- is on the table. But should the city eventually decide think bankruptcy is the only viable option, it would first have to get the governor’s consent. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

One week has passed since Republican Donald Trump was elected to become the 45th president of the United States. In that time, thousands of immigrants and activists have come together to protest the new President-elect, citing, among other things, Trump's proposals on immigration. 

The U.S. Army / Creative Commons

Seventy-five years ago, Americans across the country put their lives on hold, leaving their homes and risking their lives to fight a brutal war by land, sea and air.

Today is Veterans Day, and while we honor Veterans of all wars on this day, this hour we hear the stories of the men and women of World War II.

Ninian Reid / Creative Commons

From businessman to president-elect -- it was a victory that surprised many. This hour: the rise of Republican Donald Trump. We recap Tuesday’s election results and we also hear from you.

Did you vote? What does a Trump presidency mean to you, your friends, and your family? 

Steve Johnson / Creative Commons

Connecticut is in a drought. But what does that mean for the state’s water resources? This hour, we follow up on the controversy surrounding Bloomfield’s new Niagara Bottling facility.

The California-based company will be allowed to bottle millions, if not billions, of gallons of public water -- something critics warn against due to recent climate trends. Coming up, we take a closer look. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Jesus Sanchez held his cell phone in one hand and a megaphone in the other. He was simultaneously streaming a protest at the New Haven Police Department on Facebook Live while leading the demonstrators in a chant.

Vladimir Agafonkin / Creative Commons

August Wilson's Pulitzer Prize-winning play The Piano Lesson opens this Friday at Hartford Stage. This hour, we preview the production. We also find out how it's inspiring some Connecticut residents to open up about the importance of family legacy. 

Bicycles are a type of vehicle so they belong on the road, right?

This is how the wheels turn in places such as New York City and San Francisco, where bicyclists older than age 13 are banned from riding on the sidewalk. Similar laws exist in many cities and towns throughout the country, such as Columbus, Ohio, and Chapel Hill, N.C.

That's not the case everywhere, though. In Boston and Washington, D.C., sidewalk cycling is allowed — with the exception of the downtown areas. But just because bicyclists are allowed to ride on the sidewalk doesn't mean they are welcome there.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, as part of WNPR’s week-long reporting series on the opioid epidemic, we explore racial disparities within the context of America’s crack cocaine and opioid crises

Red, White, and Black Eyes Forever / Flickr Creative Commons

Three guests, Peter Sagal of WWDTM, Maria Konnikova of The New Yorker, and Robert Evans of Cracked, take you on a tour of vice. They talk everything from casual sex to marijuana to greed and ostentation to coffee to beer to pornography. Peter and Colin also discuss what the next declared vice will be. Possibly sitting.

ChurchofSatan / Flickr

Free will, individual responsibility, and the pursuit of happiness: Fundamental tenets of, wait for it... Satanism. While the word conjures up images of fire and brimstone, the truth is a bit more complicated. So why does a religion which celebrates so much what Americans profess to hold dear get such a bad rap?

frankieleon / Flickr Creative Commons

Illicit use of prescription drugs has almost tripled among high school students in southeastern Connecticut. That's according to the Southeastern Regional Action Council.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

This Sunday marks the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. This hour, we hear from two people whose lives were forever changed by the tragedy. 

frankieleon / Creative Commons

Illicit use of prescription drugs has almost tripled among high school students in southeastern Connecticut. That's according to the Southeastern Regional Action Council.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we discuss Governor Malloy's Second Chance 2.0 legislation and find out why it failed to pass during the 2016 session. We also look at what some Connecticut communities are doing to support re-entry. And we talk to a local restaurant owner about his decision to hire ex-offenders

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