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Lydia Brown / WNPR

This hour: a lesson in public history. How are towns and cities across Connecticut and the Northeast engaging residents with the past?

We check in with a team of experts and historians. We look at examples of locally driven projects and initiatives, and consider their impact on community building and sense of place.

Do you feel a strong tie to your community’s history? We want to hear from you. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: "the search for William Grimes."

We talk to author and film producer Regina Mason about her quest to find her great-great-great-grandfather -- a New Haven resident and runaway slave. 

SUDOK1/ISTOCK / THINKSTOCK

Congress blew past a September 30 deadline to reauthorize federal funding for about 1,200 community health centers nationwide. The funding lapse is already having an impact in Connecticut.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Board of Regents will vote on a proposal that would dramatically restructure Connecticut’s community colleges later this week.

bluesbby / Creative Commons

President Trump wants to "Make America Great Again," by turning back the clock to a time he believes was safer, purer, and removed from the dangers of modern society.

He's not the first president to evoke nostalgia for the Rockwellian image of small town life where everyone knew one another, had a good job, and raised a family. The mental scene may vary but the nostalgia for something lost remains constant.

A proposed memorial honoring World War II veterans is causing controversy. The dispute focuses on just who should be honored.

The memorial is designed to be an exact copy of one that was removed in 1959 to make way for a new highway. It honored black veterans who served in World War II, but only covers those who enlisted or were drafted through 1943.

Fronteiras do Pensamento https://www.flickr.com/photos/fronteirasweb / Creative Commons

Nobel Peace Prize 2011 winner Leymah Gbowee made a passionate plea on Thursday to those who work in conflict zones around the world to include women as equal partners in the journey toward peace.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

With the Connecticut state budget at an impasse, and the city in the throes of a structural budget problem that projects a $50 million deficit this year alone, Hartford is looking for options. 

Fr. Gaurav Shroff flickr.com/photos/gashwin/14038730367 / Creative Commons

Eighty-five Catholic parishes in Connecticut merged or closed on Thursday, June 29, the result of a pastoral plan that was in the works at the Hartford Archdiocese for two years. 

James Monteiro

To Sokeo Ros, dance is more than an art form. It’s a catalyst for change; a means of self-discovery. 

Lori Mack/WNPR

A brand new performance stage was unveiled on the New Haven Green Wednesday. The new, city-owned feature will be used for concerts and other events starting this weekend.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Although I grew up in Waterbury with a big veggie garden in the backyard, my first foray into gardening as an adult was in a community garden. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

This hour: bridging West Africa’s communication gap. We hear how one Connecticut-based nonprofit is bringing community radio to Senegalese villages. It's something host Lucy Nalpathanchil reported on during her visit to the country late last month. 

rashida s. mar b. / flickr

The stereotypes around homeschooling have existed for decades. Since the modern homeschooling movement began in the late 20th century, those who favored this educational approach have largely been perceived as white, anti-establishment, radically Christian, and ultra-conservative.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

I’ve been in Senegal to follow efforts to expand community radio in the country, spending three days in the busy city capital, Dakar, and then the rest of a week in the countryside.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

I’ve been in Senegal over the last several days to follow the work being done to expand community radio into an important rural part of the country called Tambacounda. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Bonjour! I’ve taken a few days away from hosting WNPR's Where We Live to report from Senegal, on the west coast of Africa. I'm following the work of a Connecticut-based non-profit, Le Korsa, which is working with local groups in Senegal to help rural villages open their own community radio stations.

A Trip To The Barber Shop

May 19, 2017
Shana Sureck

Social media can keep us from finding the space and time to really sit down and talk with one another. But there is one place where you can bet on a frank discussion – the barber shop.

This hour, we revisit our show on the role barber shops play in American communities – from the cities to the 'burbs.

Storytelling is built into cultures around the world. It’s a way of socializing, passing down family history, and for people of different cultures stories can reveal common ground.

Finding that common ground is what the International Institute of New England, a refugee resettlement agency operating in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, hopes to accomplish with “Suitcase Stories,” a new traveling series of live storytelling performances.

The Power Of A Story

Voice of America / Wikimedia Commons

Khizr Khan entered a life in the public eye after he spoke at the Democratic National Convention last summer, challenging then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump to read the U.S. Constitution.

This hour, we speak to the Pakistani American and Gold Star Father about life after that memorable speech, and why he continues to travel around the country to speak on behalf of religious and minority rights. 

Basheer Tome / Creative Commons

A plan to consolidate operations within Connecticut’s State Colleges and Universities system — to save millions — has roiled staff and raised questions about how well the schools can respond to the needs of students in their communities.

This hour, we talk about the Board of Regents decision and we want to hear from you.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

President Donald Trump’s budget proposal plans to zero out funding for something called Community Development Block Grants -- money that goes from the federal government to states and municipalities to use as they see fit.

Sumit Chachra / Creative Commons

Recent hate crimes against Indians living in the U.S. have — again — sparked debate within South Asian communities, recalling memories of similar attacks after 9/11.

This hour, we hear reaction from Indians living in Connecticut. What’s the best way to respond to incidents of hate?

City Year / Creative Commons

A high-profile former skinhead will be speaking in Connecticut Wednesday. His talk follows several incidents of phoned-in bomb threats at Jewish Community Centers in Connecticut and across the country. The event is hosted by the Anti-Defamation League of Connecticut, and focuses on the story of how a white supremacist went from extremist to activist. 

Lori Mack/WNPR

Jewish community centers in Connecticut and across the country have been the target of phoned-in bomb threats. In response, U.S. Senator Chris Murphy and Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro met with members of the Jewish community in Woodbridge, where they’ve received two threats -- the most recent about two weeks ago. 

A Trip To The Barber Shop

Feb 24, 2017
Shana Sureck

Social media can keep us from finding the space and time to really sit down and talk with one another. But there is one place where you can bet on a frank discussion – the barber shop.

This hour, we examine the role barber shops play in American communities – from the cities to the 'burbs.

Muslims in America are the subject of heated political debate. But they account for a very small number of elected politicians in New England.

One nonprofit, based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is encouraging American-Muslims across the U.S. to run for political office. The group, called Jetpac, will train potential candidates regardless of party affiliation with the goal of increasing civic engagement within Muslim communities.

The Caribbean -- its islands, its history and its people -- has had a profound influence on communities around the globe -- including Connecticut.

This hour, we talk with author Joshua Jelly-Schapiro about his new book, Island People: The Caribbean and the World

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Friends and family gather this week for the holidays. It’s a time when we celebrate with each other and give thanks. But holidays can be an especially difficult time for those who have lost a spouse or another loved one.

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