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There are a group of Connecticut parents who feel they must relinquish custody of  their “high needs” children in order to get them into residential treatment programs when in-home services are inadequate to meet their needs. 

Saving Children From Cycle Of Trauma

Jun 12, 2019
Hilary Hahn, Project Director, Yale Childhood Violent Trauma Center and New Haven Police  Department Lieutenant Manmeet Colon during a meeting at the Yale Child Study Center.
Melanie Stengel / C-HIT.org

Shawn was 4 years old when he watched his dad, Jonathan Whaley, keel over at their doorstep from a gunshot wound to his back. He remembers the pool of blood, the paramedics, and the police.

RYAN CARON KING / CT Public Radio

Over the next year, Connecticut’s juvenile justice system will be under review by the Council of State Governments Justice Center. The state was selected, in a competitive process, to be part of an initiative to improve outcomes for youth. The review kicked off Tuesday. 

yourgenome / Creative Commons

With the last decade of the twentieth century came the first clinical trials for a biotechnology known as gene therapy. Since then, how far has gene therapy come? And how far has it left to go?

This hour, we consider these and other questions, and we also hear from you. Were you or was someone close to you diagnosed with a genetic disease? What thoughts or questions do you have about gene therapy and its ongoing advancement? 

Every time Jennifer Tidd's son was secluded or restrained at school, she received a letter from his teachers. Her son has autism and behavioral issues, and over three years — from 2013 to 2016 — Tidd got 437 of those letters.

"I see this pile of documents that's 5 inches tall that represents hundreds of hours of being locked into a room, and I feel, you know, horrible," Tidd says.

She's sitting in her living room in Northern Virginia, her head hanging over the stack of papers. Tears are in her eyes.

Kristy Faith / Creative Commons

A 10-year-old boy in the New Haven area had developed a bad case of chronic asthma — he could no longer play sports with his friends and had to take high doses of steroids. He was constantly missing school and ending up in the emergency department.

Oyvind Holmstad / Wikimedia Commons

As Barbie Millicent Roberts -- yes, that's her name -- turns 60 we, as a plastic loving nation, celebrate! For six decades the impossibly proportioned fashion doll has been delighting children and adults around the world.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Legislators said Thursday that they are holding off on changes to the state’s childhood vaccination laws, including the religious exemption.

GOVERNMENT OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND / CREATIVE COMMONS

New and corrected data on school vaccination rates were released Friday after the state gave out controversial and disputed information last week.

Officials from the state Department of Public Health said they worked with school officials to identify and correct errors in a report that shows the number of unvaccinated children attending every school in the state.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When Rabbi Philip Lazowski was just eleven years old, the Nazis invaded his hometown and began the mass slaughter of Jewish residents.

This hour we sit down with Rabbi Lazowski, a Holocaust survivor and longtime leader in the Greater Hartford Jewish community, to hear his story. After witnessing one of the worst sides of humanity, how did he maintain his faith and find the strength to help others?

THOMAS HAWK / CREATIVE COMMONS

Connecticut legislators are hoping to pass a bill that would make phone calls from prisons in the state free. Currently the high cost of communication between prisoners and their families has negative consequences.

Jason Taix / Pixabay

For the first time, the state Department of Public Health has released to the public details about how many children at each school in the state are vaccinated.

Bain News Service / Creative Commons

The concept of the early 20th century side show evokes images of bearded ladies, sword swallowers and exotic  'others' exhibited as 'freaks' before audiences both lured and repelled by what they saw.

State Agency Highlights Preventable Child Deaths

Apr 8, 2019
vivianejl / Creative Commons

Connecticut has a relatively low death rate among children, but the state’s Department of Children and Families is calling for more awareness of simple steps that can help keep kids safe. 

Anthony Kelly / Creative Commons

There are a group of Connecticut parents who feel they must relinquish custody of  their “high needs” children in order to get them into residential treatment programs when in-home services are inadequate to meet their needs. 

bmJi / Creative Commons / Flickr

High rates of obesity, diabetes and other chronic health conditions have doctors supporting local, state and national policies on reducing the amount of sugary beverages that kids drink.

Jeffrey Smith / Creative Commons

Listen live on Monday at 9:00 am.

job while also raising a family.

This hour, we take a deep dive into the realities of modern-day motherhood. We talk with a sociologist who spent years in the field interviewing working moms. We also get a local perspective, and we want to hear from you. 

Carlos Mejia / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Venture into one New London, Connecticut nonprofit and you will find yourself surrounded by art. Not just any art, either. Art inspired by the rich cultures of Latin America.

This hour, we go inside Expressiones Cultural Center. We meet up with one of the nonprofit's co-founders, and wander through the mind of its current artist in residence: a forestry engineer from Lima, Peru. 

An ebullient Ella, with her sister Riley, outside the Old State House.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Ella Briggs, now 11, will never forget the day she got sent to the “naughty chair” in kindergarten for putting pants on her gingerbread person.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

People who describe themselves as "proponents for choice in vaccines" held a press conference Tuesday at the state capitol, on pending state legislation that would mandate certain vaccines. Part of the press conference was a presentation by vaccine skeptic Robert F. Kennedy Jr. who raised concerns about the safety of one particular vaccine, Gardasil. 

Updated at 4:51 p.m. ET

Tens of thousands of students around the world skipped school school Friday to protest inaction on climate change. It was one of the largest turnouts so far in a months long movement that included the U.S. for the first time, in an event organizers call the "U.S. Youth Climate Strike."

Alan Light / Creative Commons

It was hard to watch the first part of Leaving Neverland, the documentary which aired on HBO aired on March 3. The poignancy of the mixed emotions expressed by two men and their mothers who fell under the spell of Michael Jackson and later, his predation, left me feeling like a fly on the wall of a particularly difficult visit to a therapist. I was forced to consider my own complicity in how we collectively create and reward a celebrity culture that allows us to suspend reality against our own better judgment.

Death first visited me on a Thursday.

I had a brown 'n' serve roll in my hand and a Vesuvius of buttered mashed potatoes on my plate. It was Thanksgiving and my 7th birthday, 1983.

Matthew Powell / Flickr

When it comes to gambling addiction, what segments of the U.S. population are most affected? This hour, we look at a new report by Connecticut Public Radio and the Sharing America initiative, which shines a light on the issue of problem gambling within the Southeast Asian refugee community.

Later, we discuss a new report on weight-based bullying and its effect on young members of the LGBTQ community. Dr. Rebecca Puhl of the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity joins us and we also hear from you. 

Bru-nO / Pixabay

Black and Hispanic men and boys in the U.S. experience worse health outcomes than other groups. This hour we take a look at Connecticut’s first-ever report card on the health of men and boys of color in our state.

A bedroom in the intake unit of the Connecticut Juvenile Training School in November 2015.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A new report is raising serious concerns about conditions for young people incarcerated or detained in Connecticut facilities.

The Sleep Judge / Creative Commons

Many women who become pregnant miscarry without knowing it. Yet miscarriage is not something we, as a society, often talk about. Why?

This hour, we take an in-depth look and we also hear from you. Have you or a loved one ever miscarried? Where did you turn for support? 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public

Rabbi Philip Lazowski has been a longtime leader in the greater Hartford area. He was Rabbi of Beth Hillel Synagogue in Bloomfield for 45 years and he is currently Chaplain for the State Senate, Hartford Hospital, and the Hartford Police Department. But when he was 11 years old, Nazis invaded Poland and slaughtered Jewish residents in his hometown of Bielica, Poland.  

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

When Rabbi Philip Lazowski was just eleven years old, the Nazis invaded his hometown and began the mass slaughter of Jewish residents.

This hour we sit down with Rabbi Lazowski, a Holocaust survivor and longtime leader in the Greater Hartford Jewish community, to hear his story. After witnessing one of the worst sides of humanity, how did he maintain his faith and find the strength to help others?

Dave White / Creative Commons

For interview highlights from this show, click here. 

It’s been fifteen years since the death of Fred Rogers -- a man who, for decades, served as the cardigan-donning host and creator of Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.

Rogers’ life is now the focus of a new Maxwell King biography -- aptly titled The Good Neighbor. This hour, we sit down with King for a special preview of the book. 

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