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Access Health CT

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Brianne Foley didn’t have time to plan for the birth of her first child. So when she and her husband were having their second child, Foley did extensive research on which ones accepted Medicaid and were within driving distance of her home in Watertown.

That’s when she found a practice run by certified nurse midwives.

Access Health CT

The federal health care law was known as Obamacare. And Republicans, including President Trump, campaigned on repealing it.  

Jim Wadleigh, former CEO of Access Health CT.
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The former CEO of the state’s health care exchange has resigned from his new private sector job, just weeks after taking it. Jim Wadleigh now says his move may have contravened state ethics laws.

UW Health / Creative Commons

The rate of people without health insurance in rural Connecticut has gone down dramatically since the passage of the Affordable Care Act.

That’s the takeaway message from a new report on health insurance out of Georgetown University’s Center for Children and Families. Edwin Park, a research professor at the center, said the key to the drop is the state’s expansion of Medicaid to include more people.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Late last week, the Department of Justice announced it would not defend the Affordable Care Act in a lawsuit filed by 20 conservative state attorneys general.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Open enrollment on the state’s health care exchange, Access Health Connecticut, ends Friday at midnight. 

Access Health CT

Open enrollment on the federal website Healthcare.gov will end this week. But if you’re looking for a plan on Connecticut’s exchange you have a little longer - until December 22nd. And Access Health CT has been using some novel methods to get the word out about health care coverage. 

Access Health CT

Open enrollment to buy health insurance through the Affordable Care Act exchanges began Wednesday, but the enrollment period this time around is shorter than ever.

Connecticut Health I-Team

Consumers can begin shopping for 2018 health insurance through Access Health CT (AHCT) Wednesday, but will see sizeable price increases and have far less time to enroll than in previous years.

JD Lasica / Flickr

There’s no doubt about it—health care in the U.S. is complicated.  

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut has joined several other states in a lawsuit against the Trump administration over its decision to end subsidies for low-income consumers who get their health insurance from Obamacare exchanges.

Access Health CT

Connecticut’s health insurance exchange, Access Health CT, is ramping up for open enrollment. The Obamacare marketplace is facing a number of challenges this year. 

Gubcio / iStock / Thinkstock

Customers on Connecticut’s health care exchange will be facing double digit rate increases next year, but the state’s insurance commissioner said Wednesday she’s hopeful there might be some relief in sight. 

Access Health CT

Connecticut’s health care exchange will once again have two insurers offering plans next year, a welcome relief for Access Health Connecticut, which has been on shifting sands since the election of Donald Trump as president. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini has a message for Washington, as the uncertainty over health care reform continues. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The U.S Senate recently rejected a number of Republican plans to repeal, replace, or just overhaul the Affordable Care Act. But the health care debate is far from settled.

Alex Proimos/flickr creative commons

Now that the Senate Republican health care bill has collapsed, the next step may be to vote on an outright repeal -- though that plan also faces political hurdles. But were the repeal to happen, it could have serious consequences for state residents.

sudok1/iStock / Thinkstock

Connecticut estimates as many as 230,000 of its residents on Medicaid could lose insurance coverage in the next ten years if the Senate Republicans' health bill is passed, and the state will have to shoulder an additional $3 billion in cost.

Access Health CT

The Secretary of Health and Human Services said new data showing people dropping out of coverage under the Affordable Care Act is proof government should step back from health care. But the head of Connecticut’s health care exchange begged to differ. 

Markus Spiske / Creative Commons

Lawmakers continue to debate health care policy in Washington, and millions wonder if they’ll be insured in the future.

This hour, we consider the impact here at home.

Gubcio / iStock / Thinkstock

There's been a lot of focus lately on how revisions to federal health insurance laws may affect people on state exchanges like the one in Connecticut. But in fact, repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act won’t just alter the landscape for consumers on the exchanges -- it’s certain to have a big impact on employer plans too. 

Screenshot / C-Span

Connecticut Democratic Senator Chris Murphy is calling out Republicans for the secrecy surrounding the crafting of legislation reforming health care. And he condemned the Trump administration for what he said is an effort to sabotage the Affordable Care Act.

vichie81/iStock / Thinkstock

The two health insurers who currently offer plans on the state's health care exchange say they intend to return in 2018, but both have requested hefty rate increases. The cost of health care generally looks set to rise in Connecticut, as the Department of Insurance gets to work to review insurers rate requests.

Ron Cogswell / Creative Commons

House Republicans in Washington have passed a law to undo the Affordable Care Act -- the signature legislation of President Barack Obama. But Connecticut officials and some health care advocates have not responded favorably. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

National uncertainty over the future of the Affordable Care Act is making state officials nervous, and the CEO of Access Health CT, the state’s health care exchange, has told his board that he fears insurers could back out of the marketplace the state created. 

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

A bipartisan group of legislators and advocates are urging passage of a bill that would allow all pregnant women in Connecticut access to insurance coverage for pre- and post-natal care.

@SeemaCMS / Twitter

Republican efforts to repeal and replace Obamacare have officially failed, and President Donald Trump said he's waiting for the health insurance marketplace to explode. But what will that mean for Connecticut?

Lori Mack / WNPR

Yale medical students, doctors, and other health care providers demonstrated in New Haven to express their outrage over the Donald Trump administration’s move to repeal the Affordable Care Act.

No one knows what will happen to the Affordable Care Act, or to coverage for the roughly 300,000 Connecticut residents insured under the program. But the state office in charge of the ACA is still making plans for the future – hoping to make the private marketplace more attractive for insurers.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Access Health CT, the state’s health care exchange, must figure out its future under soon-to-be President Donald Trump. But that’s far from simple. Trump has been clear he intends to repeal and replace Obamacare – the Affordable Care Act – but it's less clear what he intends to replace it with. 

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