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Where We Live

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Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories. Join the conversation with host Lucy Nalpathanchil, every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us when we're live at 888-720-9677. Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at 860-275-7272.

The Senior Director is Catie Talarski. Our Digital Producer is Carlos Mejia. The Technical Producer is Chion Wolf.

Memorials

May 31, 2011
karu101, Creative Commons

Connecticut is host to hundreds of war memorials and monuments dating back all the way back to the Civil War. These memorials are usually very literal - depictions of heroic figures or commemorations of the war dead. Or they are truly monumental: points of civic pride meant to be gathering places for the community. But over time, memorials have grown increasingly conceptual and abstract, and are often a touchstone for controversy.

Exploring Jazz at Firehouse 12

May 27, 2011
Chion Wolf, WNPR

Firehouse 12 in New Haven  is an innovative space that is part of a neighborhood resurgence in downtown New Haven. In fact, the jazz trumpeter and composer Taylor Ho Bynum says that there are only a few places like it in the world. It's a high-tech recording studio that presents avant garde jazz, while attracting a crowd to its downstairs cocktail bar.  The setting is a renovated firehouse in the up-and-coming Ninth Square neighborhood, newly filled with restaurants and galleries.

Transportation and Jobs

May 26, 2011
jjsala, Creative Commons

Nearly 30 million trips are made every day using public transit, mostly in the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas.  And the main destination of these millions of commuters is, not surprisingly, work.  So a new Brookings report surveyed public transit in 100 cities in the U.S. including Bridgeport, New Haven and Hartford, to see just how effective public transit is in getting people to their jobs every day.

Where We Live: Transportation and Jobs

May 26, 2011
jjsala, Creative Commons

Nearly 30 million trips are made every day using public transit, mostly in the nation’s 100 largest metropolitan areas.  And the main destination of these millions of commuters is, not surprisingly, work.  So a new Brookings report surveyed public transit in 100 cities in the U.S. including Bridgeport, New Haven and Hartford, to see just how effective public transit is in getting people to their jobs every day.

Where We Live: Justice And The Courts

May 25, 2011
William Mitchell College of Law, St. Paul, Minnesota

Of the four cardinal virtues, why is lady justice the only one who has a statue in courthouses around the world?

Yeah, in case you didn’t remember - those other virtues, Temperence, Prudence and Fortitude all seemingly have some role to play in our systems of law and governance.   But it's Justice that’s become the icon of democracy.

Preserving the Character of Connecticut

May 24, 2011
susteph, creative commons

May is “Preservation Month” in Connecticut - and preservationists just celebrated a six-year milestone.

The wide-ranging Community Investment Act was signed into state law in 2005.  It increases investment in the areas that preservationists have shown the most concern about - open space, farmland preservation, historic preservation and affordable housing.

The Influencing Machine: Brooke Gladstone On The Media

May 23, 2011
W.W. Norton, publishers

A 24-hour news cycle, media moguls with political agendas, blurred lines between news and commentary. To many, these are sign’s that today’s media couldn’t be farther removed from the integrity of its roots.

After more than two decades reporting on the Media, NPR’s Brooke Gladstone is of the opinion that we’ve been here before, and it’s actually been worse. Gladstone presents her manifesto in the new book The Influencing Machine.

The Science Of Annoying

May 19, 2011
Editor B, Creative Commons

You’re on the train, listening to only one half of somebody else’s inane conversation.  That is so annoying!

What else annoys you?  Lip-smacking at the dinner table, slow drivers in the left lane, someone singing (ever so slightly) off key.  Let’s see, I’ve gotten some of these from people: Close talkers, crying kids on a plane, the toilet seat left up (sorry ladies), texting during a movie (or during dinner, or during an important conversation)...

Chion Wolf Photo

It’s the first visit of a President to commencement ceremonies at the academy since George W. Bush’s visit in 2007.  That year, President Bush was in the middle of two wars and used the occasion to talk about foreign policy and homeland security.

President Obama addresses the academy only a few weeks after a team of Navy Seals killed Osama Bin Laden.  It’s given his presidency a boost, and today he’s expected to talk to the 229 graduates about some of the same issues Mr. Bush addressed...including their role in protecting the country.

The Supreme Memory Show

May 17, 2011
therichbrooks, creative commons

Today’s guest memorized the precise order of an entire deck of cards in one minute and forty seconds.

This supreme act of memorization earned Joshua Foer a US record for speed and a winning title at the US memory championship in 2006.  But how does his uncanny ability to memorize useless information relate to our daily blunders of lost car keys, forgotten birthdays…and the classic: “I know you just told me… but what’s your name again?!” 

Roots of Prejudice

May 16, 2011
Linda, Creative Commons

Prejudice is one of the more troubling and baffling aspects of human nature

It has been the subject of scientific study for years.  But while social psychologists have learned a great deal about attitudes and societal influences that cause intergroup conflict, little effort has been devoted to understanding how adult humans come to have these biases in the first place.  So a Yale study set out to discover the roots of human prejudice, by studying groups of rhesus monkeys.

College And Its "Degrees of Inequality"

May 12, 2011
Werwin15, Creative Commons

Could our higher education system, once seen as a great equalizer, actually be adding to the nation’s inequalities?

As high schoolers grapple with the grueling spring admissions process, one author argues that students’ true courses into college are forged by many factors other than their grades.

In her book Degrees of Inequality: Culture, Class, and Gender in American Higher Education, Ann Mullen analyses two New Haven schools.

Design Thinking Takes On Health Care

May 10, 2011
Brooke Singer

From shopping to banking to taxes “design thinking” is all around us....But beyond the buzz phrase, what does it mean?

Here’s another one: “Data Visualization” - and you’ve gotta come up with something better than an overhead projector showing a pie chart.  

Today we try to understand these new ways of looking at the systems that govern our lives, health, finances, even our environmental impact.  

Talking Afghanistan and Pakistan With Chris Murphy

May 6, 2011
Wikipedia Commons

Last week, while he was in Afghanistan, Congressman Chris Murphy saw a wanted poster for Osama Bin Laden in the special ops command center.

Now, that poster’s down - but Bin Laden’s death doesn’t clean up the messy history of US involvement in Afghanistan, or the rocky relationship between the US and Pakistan.  We’ve heard this week that top officials in that country didn’t know Bin Laden was hiding out so close to the capital...

The Bro Show

May 5, 2011
creative commons

Hank Mandel lives by a motto: When you die, if you’ve got five real friends, you’ve had a great life.

But real friendships between men - that’s not always easy.  

So awkward, in fact, that it seems they’re always the stuff of comedy - beer commercials and “buddy” flicks.  They’re called “bromances” and “man crushes” and anything to distract from the truth.

Millennials Redefine the Workplace

May 3, 2011
creative commons

Workplace expert Al Bhatt says our places of employment should be made up of jazz bands, rather than a marching band.

Bhatt’s done consulting work for big companies like Facebook, Siemens, American Express, and State Farm Insurance.

Now Facebook, I can see them being pretty improvisational...but an insurance company?  

Today, in advance of our “small business breakfast” tomorrow in Bridgeport, we’re going to look at the changing workplace in big businesses, and how they’re adapting to a new workforce.  

Bin Laden is Dead

May 2, 2011

President Barack Obama made the stunning announcement late last night that a long intelligence operation led US forces to a compound 60 miles outside of Islamabad, Pakistan - where they killed Bin Laden in a firefight.   In his short speech, he also asked Americans to think back to the sense of unity that the nation felt after 9/11- unity that has since frayed.  

Mentally Ill Inundate State Prisons

Apr 28, 2011
Casey Serin, Creative Commons

About one in five prisoners in Connecticut is receiving mental health treatment .

According to the 2010 recidivism report recently released by the state, inmates with mental health problems are significantly more likely to end up back in jail once they get out.

The statistics reveal a flawed system of treatment and rehabilitation for the mentally ill in the state’s justice system - but it’s not confined to Connecticut.  

The Science Of Annoying

Apr 26, 2011
Editor B, Creative Commons

You’re on the train, listening to only one half of somebody else’s inane conversation.  That is so annoying!

What else annoys you?  Lip-smacking at the dinner table, slow drivers in the left lane, someone singing (ever so slightly) off key.  Let’s see, I’ve gotten some of these from people: Close talkers, crying kids on a plane, the toilet seat left up (sorry ladies), texting during a movie (or during dinner, or during an important conversation)...

Addicted to Food

Apr 25, 2011
stev.ie, creative commons

Cocaine v. Chocolate Milkshake? Could there be a similarity?  

One Yale researcher says that addictions to both food and drugs have similar reactions on the brain. Using an MRI, participants’ brains were scanned while looking at and eating a chocolate milkshake.

Local Art Activates Change

Apr 21, 2011
Julie Dickerson

Recently a vandal broke into St. Paul and St. James Episcopal church in New Haven.  The ransacked the chapel, broken windows and tore a bible. 

So, how did the church community respond?  With a message of forgiveness through music.  Several days later the most valuable stolen items  were returned to the front step.  It’s just one of many examples of local artists promoting social justice, tolerance and change through their work. 

Our Growing Cities

Apr 20, 2011
Chion Wolf

It might be a stretch to say Connecticut cities are “booming,” but new census figures show they are growing.

People are starting to move back into Connecticut’s cities. This reverses a decades-long trend toward suburban sprawl and urban decline.  The five largest cities in the state have gained close to 23,000 residents.  There are more housing units, and more of those homes are filled with people.  

Tax Day

Apr 18, 2011
Chion Wolf

When critics say the state shouldn’t increase taxes on the wealthy, they often say that it’ll force the rich to leave Connecticut.  So, is it true?

Two new studies show - well, that’s it’s not true at all.  That other factors, beyond the tax rate, are what drives people to make decisions about where to live.  

Tax Day

Apr 18, 2011
Chion Wolf

When critics say the state shouldn’t increase taxes on the wealthy, they often say that it’ll force the rich to leave Connecticut.  So, is it true?

Two new studies show - well, that’s it’s not true at all.  That other factors, beyond the tax rate, are what drives people to make decisions about where to live.  

Immigration Day

Apr 13, 2011
Chion Wolf, WNPR

Today mark’s the state’s 14th Annual Immigrant Day

Financial Literacy and Connecticut's Kids

Apr 12, 2011
Chion Wolf

We’re struggling to get out of a recession, caused in part by borrowing way too much.  So, if grown-ups can’t manage their money – how should we expect kids to?

Many financial experts say that children aren’t learning the right lessons about how to handle their money.  Here’s an example: A recent study finds that today’s parents are “incredibly lenient” about handing their children extra money – you know, that 20 dollars to go see a movie, over and above their allowance.

Cross-Cultural "Oops"

Apr 11, 2011
Kenneth Lu / Creative Commons

So we keep hearing that we’re a “global society.”  But that can lead to some big gaps in cultural understanding. 

Today we talk to international businesspeople, consultants, and bi-lingual Americans who have learned how to negotiate across cultures…a necessity in a world where we’re all connected, but all communicate very differently.  

But even the most seasoned multi-cultural travelers can tell of laughable faux-pas and huge business deals gone sour, over mere misunderstandings.

The Government Shutdown

Apr 8, 2011

There’s a midnight deadline.  If a deal between lawmakers and the White House can’t be struck, the federal government shuts down.

And the next question is…does it matter?  We’re being assured that even in shut-down mode, our mail still gets delivered, entitlement benefits will still be paid, the military will keep fighting on three fronts. 

But other services you count on from the government are still kind of up in the air.  That expedited passport for the surprise Caribbean cruise?  The big tax refund you were planning on to pay for said cruise?

New Media Partnerships in Journalism

Apr 7, 2011
Elvert Barnes, Creative Commons

For years, we’ve been hearing about the chronic struggles of newspapers and the proliferation of so called “new media” sources of journalism.  

As one outcome of this change, the traditional competition for stories between papers has given way to a new era of cooperation. By pooling resources and working together, these upstarts are making a real impact, informing the community, and driving the discussion in collaboration with newspapers.  

Today we continue our series of conversations recorded at a conference called “Lifting the Veil: Journalism Uncovered.”

Roots of Prejudice

Apr 6, 2011
Linda, Creative Commons

Prejudice is one of the more troubling and baffling aspects of human nature

It has been the subject of scientific study for years.  But while social psychologists have learned a great deal about attitudes and societal influences that cause intergroup conflict, little effort has been devoted to understanding how adult humans come to have these biases in the first place.  So a Yale study set out to discover the roots of human prejudice, by studying groups of rhesus monkeys.

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