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Where We Live

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Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories. Join the conversation with host Lucy Nalpathanchil, every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us when we're live at 888-720-9677. Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at 860-275-7272.

The Senior Director is Catie Talarski. Our Digital Producer is Carlos Mejia. The Technical Producer is Chion Wolf.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Salem, Massachusetts has long been a focal point in the history of early New England witch trials. But Windsor, Connecticut also has a place on this dark historical timeline: as the site of the nation's first witch hanging. This hour, author Beth Caruso joins us to shine light this little-known piece of Connecticut's past, and talk about how it inspired her novel One of Windsor.

wsilver / Flickr Creative Commons

For some kids, the playground is a place of fun and friendship. For others, it is a source of anxiety and fear. The fear of being left out.

Why do some kids struggle to make friends while others do not? And what can grown ups do to help?

We take an in-depth look with Why Will No One Play With Me? author Caroline Maguire. We also talk about the realities of adult friendships with NPR's Julia Furlan. 

Debby Shapiro

Middletown today is known for its vibrant main street and the scenic grounds of Wesleyan University.

But the city began as a trading port on the Connecticut River, and from its founding, much of the wealth that came into that port was tied to the transatlantic slave trade. This hour, we hear about a new UNESCO memorial that has brought recognition to that city’s role in slavery.

We also learn about members of a historic African American family in that city who were at the forefront of fighting slavery. The Bemans were prominent abolitionists and leaders in the Middletown’s free black community in the 19th century. 

Some residents today are hoping to see a new public school bear the name of that family. Are you a Middletown resident? How do you think your city should approach its history?

Wokandapix / Pixabay

As college students wrap up their fall semester, there is an expectation their professors are tenured. But three out of four faculty today aren’t eligible for tenure. And many are adjuncts, part-time faculty without strong benefits or job security.

What’s the human cost to this model of education? We find out and we want to hear from you.

JJBers / Creative Commons

Anyone who’s spent time outdoors in Connecticut has probably come across a dam or two. The state is home to more than 4,000 dams, a dozen of which were spotlighted in a recent national dam safety investigation by The Associated Press.

This hour, we take an in-depth look at this investigation. What do its findings tell us about the integrity of the nation’s dam infrastructure? And how are states like Connecticut working to address dam safety? 

Studio Incendo - P1111040 / Wikimedia Commons

For nearly six months, pro-democracy protesters have taken to the streets of Hong Kong. Some demonstrations have turned violent, as protesters clash with the police. 

This hour, we talk about the roots of this protest movement and learn more about the history of the territory's relationship with mainland China. We also hear from a reporter who sat down with a Hong Kong father and son, two men on opposite sides of the police-community divide.

Crandall “CJ” Yopp

Dr. Khalilah Brown-Dean is a Quinnipiac University professor and author of Identity Politics in the United States. 

Earlier this month, she sat down with us in front of a live audience to talk about the book, which paints identity politics -- a term often associated with modern-day elections -- in a new, historical light.

This hour, we listen back to our conversation, and we also hear from you. 

image of fiber optics
Groman123 / Flickr

Most of us enjoy high-speed internet access. But in some areas in Connecticut, residents still don’t have broadband access. We hear about a recent court ruling that could change this.

John Atashian

The nonprofit Judy Dworin Performance Project harnesses the arts to build social awareness, staging performances that draw on issues ranging from incarceration to immigration.

And it has been doing this for 30 years.

This hour, we sit down with Judy Dworin to reflect on this milestone. We also talk with performers and colleagues, and we hear from you, too. How has the Judy Dworin Performance Project touched your life?

Pixabay

If your smartphone screen cracks, do you get it fixed or trade it in for the latest model? Repairing items can be less wasteful, but there are also growing legal challenges for people whose business is to repair technology from smartphones to tractors.

This hour, we talk about the “Right to Repair” movement. It's a debate that pits concerns about users’ ability to modify their own items against big companies’ concerns about intellectual property rights.

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

John Phelan / Wikimedia Commons

When you head to New York, do you ever take a break from the city and get lost on a trail in Central Park? This hour, we take a look at the life of the man behind that beloved and iconic city park: Connecticut native Frederick Law Olmsted.

Phil Warren / Creative Commons

On the need for new affordable housing, some Connecticut municipalities say "not in my backyard." But why this NIMBY approach?

This hour, we take an in-depth look with the author of a ProPublica-Connecticut Mirror investigation into local housing policies. We also check in with a town in southwest Connecticut, and with the policy director for the nonprofit Partnership for Strong Communities. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

While the U.S. is withdrawing from the Paris Climate Accord, states like Connecticut are still committed to reducing their carbon emissions. Offshore wind power is one way.

This hour, we take a look at proposals to bring wind energy to Connecticut. How will the Trump administration’s inaction on renewables impact this emerging industry in our region?

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Can We Get Some Volunteers?

Nov 7, 2019
rawpixel.com / Pexels

Whether through religious groups or school-organized activities, Americans have long sought ways to give back to their communities. But has this spirit of altruism faded in recent years?

This hour, we check on the state of volunteering in the U.S. and ask what is being done to motivate more Americans to do good in their spare time. Do you remember the last time you volunteered? We want to hear from you. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

At sixteen years of age, Reginald Dwayne Betts went to prison for carjacking. Decades later, Betts is a celebrated poet and graduate of Yale Law School. But, like many ex-offenders, the consequences of those teenage mistakes have followed him for years.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Tuesday, November 5 is Election Day in Connecticut. This means another opportunity for residents to cast ballots for town and city officials. But who will turn out to the polls?

This hour, we check in with reporters and analysts from across the state, and we also hear from you. Will you vote this Election Day? Why or why not?

Kishi Bashi playing violin outdoors
Max Ritter

Violinist and singer Kishi Bashi is Japanese American. His most recent musical project, Omoiyari, takes a look at the history of Japanese internment, when 120,000 Japanese Americans were incarcerated, fueled by xenophobia during World War II.

This hour, we sit down with Kishi Bashi to talk about why he’s turning to history to better understand our present, and we ask him about his unique musical style.

The State of Connecticut

The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act introduced a new initiative, the Opportunity Zones Program, to spur investment in the nation’s most distressed communities. The state of Connecticut is home to 72 Opportunity Zones. What efforts are being made to attract investors to these regions? This hour, we find out, and we also hear from you. Do you live in or near an Opportunity Zone? 

Max Pixel

High-profile cases of sexual harassment in the workplace have made headlines in recent years, from Hollywood to Capitol Hill.

A new series from Hearst Connecticut Media finds workplace sexual harassment and abuse is pervasive across Connecticut. This hour, we talk with one of the reporters behind the series.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Massachusetts has long been a focal point in the history of early New England witch trials. But Connecticut also has a place on this dark historical timeline: as the site of the nation's first witch hanging. This hour, author Beth Caruso joins us to shine light this little-known piece of Connecticut's past, and talk about how it inspired her novel One of Windsor.

Debby Shapiro

Middletown today is known for its vibrant main street and the scenic grounds of Wesleyan University.

But the city began as a trading port on the Connecticut River, and from its founding, much of the wealth that came into that port was tied to the transatlantic slave trade. This hour, we hear about a new UNESCO memorial that has brought recognition to that city’s role in slavery.

We also learn about members of a historic African American family in that city who were at the forefront of fighting slavery. The Bemans were prominent abolitionists and leaders in the Middletown’s free black community in the 19th century. 

Some residents today are hoping to see a new public school bear the name of that family. Are you a Middletown resident? How do you think your city should approach its history?

wsilver / Creative Commons

For some kids, the playground is a place of fun and friendship. For others, it is a source of anxiety and fear. The fear of being left out.

Why do some kids struggle to make friends while others do not? And what can grown ups do to help?

We take an in-depth look with Why Will No One Play With Me? author Caroline Maguire. We also talk about the realities of adult friendships with NPR's Julia Furlan. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

In April, 18-year-old Anthony Jose Vega Cruz was driving in Wethersfield, Connecticut, on the way to dinner with his girlfriend. But he was stopped by police. He fled. The pursuit ended when an officer fatally shot Vega Cruz, known as "Chulo" to family and friends. 

This hour, we sit down with reporter, Vanessa de la Torre. She is the supervising producer of Collision Course, a new Connecticut Public documentary.

Courtesy: NEAG School of Education, UConn

At 27, he was a Connecticut school principal. At 44, he is the state’s commissioner of education.

This hour, Dr. Miguel Cardona joins us to talk about his vision for Connecticut's education future. 

Mary Anne Williams

Dozens of Connecticut homes have been hoisted off the ground as the state helps pay homeowners to repair ruined concrete foundations. 

This hour, we check in on the crumbling foundations crisis that is impacting homes and homeowners. We talk with the Hartford Courant journalist behind a yearlong series on Connecticut’s ruined concrete foundations

sferrario1968 / Pixabay

The bed. It’s a central feature of daily life. We rest on it, recharge in it. But rarely do we reflect on our relationship with it. Until now. 

This hour, we sit down with Brian Fagan, co-author of the new book What We Did in Bed: A Horizontal History. We talk double beds, pod beds, Murphy beds ... even Mark Twain’s bed. And we also hear from you. 

Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

Do you worry about how you’re everyday actions contribute to climate change? You may think about the carbon gas-burning cars are putting into the atmosphere, or coal-powered electricity in your houses.

But what about the food you eat?

Tracking Connecticut's Bobcats

Oct 11, 2019
Lydia Brown / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s a lethal hunter, marked by its tufted ears and focused gaze. It's a breathtaking sight, if you’re lucky enough to see one.

This hour: the bobcat.

This stealthy species has made a comeback in recent years. We talk to researchers who are working to better understand Connecticut’s only wild feline. 

Michele Lamberti / Creative Commons

Guilt. Ah, yes, that awful, anxiety-ridden five-letter word. Most of us have experienced it. All of us have learned to dread it. But is a little guilt really such a bad thing?

This hour, we consider that question and more with a series of guilt (note we did not say “guilty”) experts. We check in with a researcher at the University of Virginia and with a psychologist based in New York. And we want to hear from you, too. 

When was the last time you felt guilty? How did that feeling impact you? 

nathanmac87 / Flickr Creative Commons

Cities and towns have laws to keep people from engaging in behavior that may disturb others, like sleeping on park benches, drinking in public, or just plain “loitering”.

What does it mean when just hanging out in a public space puts you in violation of these laws?

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