WNPR

Where We Live

MONDAYS, TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS, AND FRIDAYS AT 9:00 AM AND 7:00 PM

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Reach us when we're live at (860) 275-7266.

When we're live in our New Haven studios call us at 203-776-9677.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories.

Join the conversation with host Lucy Nalpathanchil, every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at (860) 275-7272.

Contact the producers:
Lydia Brown, Senior Producer
Carmen Baskauf, Producer

WNPR's Digital Producer is Carlos Mejia. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Yinan Chen / Wikimedia Commons

What does effective philanthropy look like in the 21st century?

This hour, we sit down with Jay Williams, the President of the Hartford Foundation for Public Giving.

We also talk with scholar and author, Chuck Collins. He is a one-percenter who dedicated his life to addressing income inequality. Collins’ policy institute has found that charities are increasingly depending on larger donations from a smaller number of wealthy individuals. We ask Collins--is that a good thing?

Jiří Nedorost / Creative Commons

Whether for sport or sustenance; by rifle or crossbow, hunting has long been a part of the human experience.

This hour, we look back on our relationship with hunting and consider what it means to hunt today.

Are you a hunter? We want to hear from you. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

When CVS agreed to acquire Aetna, they halted a plan to move the Hartford-based company’s headquarters to New York City. Connecticut has been breathing a sigh of relief that one of the capital’s largest employers isn’t ditching the state.

Nick Pyenson / National Geographic

They can weigh over a hundred tons, live their entire lives underwater, and some even hunt using sound through a method known as echolocation. Yet, whales are also complex social creatures who share much in common with humans.

This hour we talk with paleontologist Nick Pyenson about why he has dedicated his life to studying whales, or as he puts it, “Earth’s Most Awesome Creatures.” Pyenson’s new book, Spying on Whales, takes readers on a scientific quest to understand the evolutionary journey of whales from dog-sized land mammals to the ocean giants of today.

Carmen Baskauf / WNPR

Do you worry about how you’re everyday actions contribute to climate change? You may think about the carbon gas-burning cars are putting into the atmosphere, or coal-powered electricity in your houses.

But what about the food you eat?

Marco Verch / Creative Commons

In the office; on the scale.

To what extent have physicians and other medical professionals contributed to the stigmatization of obesity? This hour, we take an in-depth look.

We also discuss the effects of obesity and weight stigma on children. What responsibilities do parents, pediatricians, and educators share in keeping kids healthy and safe? 

Ladies Cycle Club of Hartford, on hill near Soldiers and Sailors Arch, 1890
Connecticut Historical Society

Bicycles helped inspire modern cars, paved roads...even airplanes! But did you know they were also an inspiration for the women's movement?

This hour we take a look back in time at the origins of the bicycle, including innovation that happened right here in Connecticut. We find out the history of how this vehicle spurred social change and helped empower women to break through gender barriers a little more than a century ago.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Nekita Waller was recently named Connecticut's 17th State Troubadour. This hour, she joins us in our studios. We talk about her background as a performer and learn about the influence she hopes to have over the state’s arts and culture scene.

Lhakpa Sherpa

A dishwasher at Whole Foods in West Hartford, Lhakpa Sherpa is also the only woman to complete nine... yes, nine... expeditions to the summit of Mount Everest. This hour, the world record holder stops by our studios to share her remarkable journey as a climber, an immigrant, and a single mother.

DigiDreamGrafix.com / Creative Commons

Amid reports of consolidations and staffing crises, we ask: What is the future of the U.S. hospital industry? A team of experts joins us as we weigh this question and consider its implications for Connecticut. 

Later, we discuss the role of crowdfunding platforms in helping alleviate the burden of medical expenses. Have you ever turned to GoFundMe or a similar site to finance the cost of treatment? We want to hear from you. 

Staff Sgt. James L. Harper Jr. / US Air Force

From veterans returning from Iraq, to survivors of mass shootings, to those putting together the pieces after a hurricane--we know that the emotional and psychological scars of violence and tragedies sometimes last even longer than physical wounds.

But what is the psychological toll on those who help victims of traumatic experiences?

C-SPAN

Christine Blasey Ford says she will testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee Thursday over allegations that U.S. Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her as a teenager.

Coming up, we wade through the details of the case and get reaction to reports of new allegations against Kavanaugh by a former Yale classmate. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

David Rosado is a Hartford native who spent two decades with the Connecticut state police. In February he became Hartford’s new Police Chief.

This hour, Chief Rosado will join us in studio. We ask him about what it’s like to return home as the top cop in the city where he grew up.

Paul Sableman / Creative Commons

It’s been ten years since the Great Recession reared its ugly head, lurching the country into a state of economic crisis. 

This hour, we look back and ask: What effect did the downturn have on the American public? And how did it come to reshape perceptions of the so-called ‘American dream’?

We check in with a senior researcher at the Pew Research Center. We also sit down with experts in the fields of economics and sociology. And we want to hear from you.

Whether you’re an immigrant or a native-born citizen, what do the words American dream mean to you? Is the answer to that question more or less clear now than it was a decade ago? 

NASA

The country watched Hurricane Florence pummel communities across the Carolinas this week, leaving flooding, destruction, and death in its path.

This hour we ask New York Times climate reporter Kendra Pierre-Louis--is climate change causing these devastating storms to become more common?

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