Where We Live | Connecticut Public Radio
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Where We Live

MONDAYS, TUESDAYS, THURSDAYS, AND FRIDAYS AT 9:00 AM AND 8:00 PM

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

On any given day, we explore topics you may be talking about at your job or at home. From immigration and education to workplace and family issues. We explore the latest scientific research and how worldwide events impact us locally.

We highlight our diverse communities. We want to hear your stories. Join the conversation with host Lucy Nalpathanchil, every day on Where We Live -- radio with a sense of place.

Contact Where We Live:

Senior Producer: Tess Terrible

Producer: Carmen Baskauf

Reach us when we're live at 888-720-9677. Reach us in the newsroom with pitches or questions at 860-275-7272.

Look For The Helpers

Apr 9, 2020
Sgt. Joe Parrish / U.S. Army Photo

Mister Rogers said, “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, "Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.”

This hour, we’re going to do just that. We’re talking to volunteers, and those working to make our lives a little brighter during this difficult time.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The latest models from national public health experts say hundreds of thousands of Americans may die from the COVID-19 pandemic. As Connecticut and other states begin to reach the peak of infections and hospitalizations, will hospitals be able to keep up?

This hour, we talk with US Senator Chris Murphy about what lawmakers should be doing to bolster the country’s healthcare capacity. The senator has called for federalizing the medical supply chain.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This hour, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont is calling in to give us the latest on the state’s response to coronavirus

Worship in the Time of Coronavirus

Apr 2, 2020
Wikipedia Commons

Churches across the states have temporarily shut down. Easter, Passover and Ramdan are all rapidly approaching and many will not be able to gather and celebrate. 

This hour, we talk to religious leaders and learn how they're navigating worship and virtual religious services.

Jeff Belmonte / Wikimedia

Love is what most people are looking for in a spouse or life partner. But this hour, we take a look at marriage, an institution that for much of history had very little to do with love at all.

We also talk about the right to end a marriage by divorce. And we want to hear from you, too.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Cases of COVID-19 have grown in New Haven, and the mayor says “the spike” is beginning in the Elm City. This hour, we talk with New Haven Mayor Justin Elicker.

As the number of COVID-19 cases rises across Connecticut, how can local leaders protect their residents? From hospitals to homelessness to jobs, what does the pandemic means for Connecticut’s second largest city?

If you are a New Haven resident, we want to hear from you. What questions do you have for Mayor Elicker?

Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

The coronavirus pandemic has closed schools across the U.S., affecting nearly 2 million public school students in New England alone. What are the educational and social impacts of this sudden shift to remote learning? What about students with special learning needs? And how might the COVID-19 crisis widen the inequities in our K-12 educational system?

Pandemic Book Club

Mar 26, 2020
Books HD

In the midst of the pandemic, it’s easy to keep the TV on all day. But it’s also the perfect time to take a step back and start a new book -- or even read an old favorite.

This hour, we discuss what we’re reading while we’re stuck at home and how to make reading a daily habit.

Pxhere

What’s it like being a dad in 2020? On the next Where We Live, we’ll talk about social expectations for fathers as caregivers, and the impact an involved father has on the entire family, emotionally and financially. Are you a father? We want to hear from you.

How are employers responding to coronavirus? 

This hour, Where We Live, we talk about how coronavirus is impacting our local businesses, and their employees.

What happens if a company has to temporarily shut down due to coronavirus? What if you, or someone else you work with gets sick?

We also hear how local farmers and local cultural institutions are staying afloat during the pandemic. 

Stock Catalog / Flickr

As the number of COVID-19 cases continues to rise in Connecticut and across the US, many Americans are staying home to prevent the spread of this deadly disease. But not everyone can work remotely and many people have lost their jobs. This hour, we take a look at the pandemic’s economic impact .

We hear from Connecticut workers in the gig economy—people who drive for Lyft or deliver for Uber Eats. And we talk with an economist about what policies can ease the economic burden on Americans.

We want to hear from you. How is the coronavirus affecting your family—and your pocketbook?

Understanding Virus Anxiety

Mar 19, 2020
Ryan Melaugh

As coronavirus cases increase, so will the associated anxiety. 

This hour, we discuss coronavirus, and how it’s affecting our mental health. 

What should people do if they are experiencing anxiety for the first time? What about those already living with mental health conditions? How should we talk with children about coronavirus?

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

As Americans respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, what should elected officials be doing to protect public health? Today, we talk with Connecticut 1st District congressman John Larson. As coronavirus spreads, how will lawmakers do their jobs? Do you have a questions for Rep Larson?

NIAID / Wikimedia Commons

Governor Lamont has declared a public health emergency and thousands of residents, including school children, are staying home.

This hour, we discuss the latest in hospital protocols and talk about who can, and cannot, get tested for coronavirus. We hear how colleges, universities, and local school districts are responding to the crisis.

Fossil conservator Amber Favreau works on disassembling the  museum’s Brontosaurus skeleton.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

This hour, we take a trip to the Yale Peabody Museum, where a renovation is giving the museum a chance to update its famous dinosaur skeletons to reflect 21st century scientific knowledge.

The museum has disassembled all of its large fossil skeletons, which have been shipped to a facility in Canada to be remounted. When they return to the Peabody in 2023, dinosaurs like the museum's Brontosaurus will be standing in jauntier--and more scientifically accurate--poses.

Pixabay

What challenges do people with criminal records face when re-entering society? What is Connecticut doing to help prior offenders reintegrate? 

This hour: we discuss challenges faced after leaving prison. This includes finding gainful employment, getting an education and even finding a place to live.

Xiaphias / Wikimedia Commons

Spend just a few minutes with young children and you’ll marvel at their imagination. Maybe they’re pretending to be a dragon running a bakery, or they’re coloring the sky purple instead of blue. But somewhere along the way, most of those kids turn into adults who say, “I’m just not a creative person!”

This hour, we ask: how can we foster children’s imaginations? What is creativity, anyway? We talk with psychologists and art teachers to explore what we can do to keep our kids, families, and society inspired by a lifelong curiosity for the arts.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

She started as a social worker in Connecticut more than two decades ago. Now, Vannessa Dorantes is the Commissioner of the state’s Department of Children and Families (DCF). This hour, we sit down with Commissioner Dorantes. What questions do you have for the leader of DCF?

Connecticut Prepares for Coronavirus

Mar 6, 2020
U.S. Army Photo / Department of Defense

What do you need to know to prepare for a coronavirus outbreak in our state? 

This hour, medical doctors join us to answer your questions. We learn how Connecticut residents can protect themselves and their families against coronavirus, and what researchers are doing to identify a vaccine.

We also discuss how employers should prepare. Is your workplace talking about coronavirus and what to do if there’s a potential outbreak?

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

March Madness begins in a couple of weeks, a favorite time of year for people who love watching college basketball. But if you want to legally place bets on your favorite team, inside Connecticut you’re out of luck.

This hour: will the General Assembly legalize sports betting this legislative session?

Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s tax season. Filing taxes can be a complicated and intimidating process. And ProPublica has found that big names in e-filing, like TurboTax, are actually making it more difficult for Americans to file easily and free of charge. This hour, we talk with a reporter behind the investigation, and find out whether you can file your taxes for free.

Pixabay

Listen Monday at 9:00 am.

Deaths related to alcohol have been rising over the past two decades, especially among women.  Today, we look at the impact of alcohol on public health.

And in January 1920, Prohibition went into effect around the country, making it illegal to sell alcohol. One century after the beginning of this national experiment, we ask: what is a productive policy approach today to dealing with addiction?

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

This November, 32 million Latinos will be eligible to vote in the 2020 election, making them the largest minority voting bloc in the United States, according to the Pew Research Center. But Latinos are a diverse electorate—with roots from more than two dozen countries. 

This hour, what are President Trump and the Democrats doing right now to reach these voters?

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Lori Jackson feared for her life, so she got a temporary restraining order against her husband. But he was still able to legally buy a handgun, which he used to kill Jackson.

This hour, we talk about the legal gaps that allow some domestic abusers to purchase firearms.

Renty -- an enslaved man whose photograph was commissioned by Harvard professor Louis Agassiz in 1850.
Courtesy of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University

When Tamara Lanier’s mother died in 2010, the Norwich, Connecticut, resident remembered a promise she made to her: to document who her ancestors were.

Lanier says she grew up hearing her mother’s stories about her great-great-great grandfather, Papa Renty, an African-born enslaved man in South Carolina.

Diliff / Wikimedia Commons

Listen Tuesday at 9:00 am.

Amid the constant discussion of Connecticut residents leaving the state, the shoreline may soon be home to five new residents: Beluga whales. 

Mystic Aquarium has petitioned the federal government for permission to import five captive belugas to join its wildlife on display. Mystic says the move would help research to aid conservation efforts. But critics say the proposal is not only hazardous for the whales but also against US law.

Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

Listen Monday at 9:00 am.

They grew up during a digital revolution, two foreign wars, and a devastating financial crisis.  Now, millennials are beginning to come into political power, and those formative experiences shaping them into a different kind of politician than found in past generations.

This hour, we talk with TIME national political correspondent Charlotte Alter. Her new book is called “The Ones We’ve Been Waiting For: How a New Generation of Leaders Will Transform America.” We learn--about the forces that have shaped millennials’ unique political experience and what this  means for the future of the country.

Trinity College

Ugandan-American musician Samite Mulondo combines music and storytelling in his performances. This hour, Samite returns to our studios to talk about his newest piece, The Story Of Mutoto, which he performs at the University of Saint Joseph this weekend.

And  Hartford’s art house theater Cinestudio celebrates fifty years of showing films this week. We talk with Cinestudio’s founders, James Hanley and Peter McMorris.

Staff Sgt. James L. Harper Jr. / U.S. Air Force

From veterans returning from Iraq, to survivors of mass shootings, to those putting together the pieces after a hurricane--we know that the emotional and psychological scars of violence and tragedies sometimes last even longer than physical wounds.

But what is the psychological toll on those who help victims of traumatic experiences?

Chion Wolf/Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This summer marks 100 years since women achieved the right to vote. Yet women still are underrepresented in political office, both nationally and in the Connecticut General Assembly. This hour, a conversation with a panel of experts and women lawmakers. We ask: what barriers remain for women who are considering seeking office?

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

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