Where We Live | Connecticut Public Radio
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Where We Live

WEEKDAYS AT 9:00 AM AND 8:00 PM

Every weekday, Lucy Nalpathanchil puts Connecticut in context, Where We Live.

Join the conversation live at 9 a.m., hear the rebroadcast at 8 p.m., or download the podcast to learn more about Connecticut: its people, its unique history, its beauty and its challenges.

On Where We Live, you hear top politicians as well as people from all over our state who are tackling issues, creating community, and sharing ideas, history, and expertise. And we take your calls, too.

Where We Live is a place to hear fascinating, informed and in-depth conversations and stories that go beyond news headlines. We start local but we take time to explore domestic and international issues and consider how they impact us here at home. 

If you're curious about state politics, Wednesdays on Where We Live devotes time for in-depth interviews with elected officials and the reporters who cover them closely. Tune in on Wednesdays for interviews with state and municipal leaders, the Governor, and Connecticut’s Congressional delegation.

Contact Where We Live:

Reach us when we're live at 888-720-9677. 

Theme music by Hannis Brown.

Murder for Two at the Ivoryton Playhouse opens July 8. Actors Ian Lowe (rear) and Joe Kinosian on the piano.
Photo: Joan Marcus

What does live theater look like for the rest of the 2021 season and going forward? Today, we talk with people making theater in our state. How have the last 15 months changed the way they engage with art and their audiences? Live theater is coming back, but what does back mean?  

Photo of Digital Body Language Book sitting on top of a laptop
Tess Terrible / Connecticut Public

You’ve been working late and you just finished a big report that you sent off to your boss. And you received a one word reply back - "Thanks (period)." How does that make you feel? 

More and more of our communication takes place online - but our online language is not something we’ve learned. It’s still a new medium.

Today, we talk about digital body language with author, Erica Dhawan . 

We want to hear from you. Do emojis belong in a work email? How can you make your best first impression, through zoom?!

This hour, Governor Ned Lamont has signed a bill allowing recreational use of cannabis.

We speak with Connecticut State Representative Robyn Porter about her role in the debate over the pot bill.

She pushed the Lamont administration to accept more provisions she said would help communities harmed by the war on drugs, but some of her efforts resulted in special session drama during the vote on the proposal.

A mother humpback and calf in a bay off Vava'u, Tonga. They'd joined a few thousand adult humpbacks in Antarctica during summer before returning to the South Pacific. Along the way young whales began to imitate adult feeding methods and other behaviors.
Brian Skerry / National Geographic

They are giants who live their whole lives underwater. In many ways, a whale’s life is completely alien to the human experience. Yet these ocean giants share some surprising similarities with us.

Illustration of overlapping speech bubbles
Gerd Altmann / PublicDomainPictures

We all communicate in our daily lives, but how do languages actually work?

Photo of traffic on I-95 Northbound in Stamford, Connecticut
Nutmegger / Wikimedia Commons

In 2018, Connecticut announced it would be part of an ambitious multi-state program to cut carbon emissions from transportation. In December 2020, Governor Lamont signed a Memorandum of Understanding with Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and D.C., committing to launch a regional transportation "cap and invest" program.

Collection of the U.S. House of Representatives

We look at the career of Ella Grasso. Known as the first woman in the country to be elected governor who did not follow her husband, and the person who led the state through the Blizzard of 1978.

She was also a state lawmaker, secretary of the state, and member of Congress from Connecticut, at a time when politics was mostly a man’s world.  

Boys playing
Pxhere

When you think back to your childhood, what was your favorite thing to do? Did you have a favorite stuffed animal or did you spend a lot of time outside? Today, we talk about the importance of play. There are lots of conversations about learning loss in the pandemic but learning through play is as important as classroom learning.

The Connecticut State Capitol Building
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

From 24-hour-long zoom public hearings to a Capitol closed to the public, 2021’s legislative session was like no other.

This hour, we recap what happened in the Connecticut General Assembly, and find out what legislation passed and what didn’t.

A cairn in front of an alpine slope with the White Mountains of New Hampshire in the background
Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public

One hundred years ago, a Connecticut-born forester came up with a wild idea, creating a trail that stretched through the Appalachian Mountains, from Georgia to Maine.

Now--thousands of hikers attempt to through-hike the Appalachian trail each year. Millions more use parts of the trail for recreation.

Sepia-tone black and white photo of Ladies Cycle Club of Hartford, on hill near Soldiers and Sailors Arch, 1890.
Connecticut Historical Society

Bicycles helped inspire modern cars, paved roads...even airplanes! But did you know they were also an inspiration for the women's movement?

This hour we take a look back in time at the origins of the bicycle, including innovation that happened right here in Connecticut. We find out the history of how this vehicle spurred social change and helped empower women to break through gender barriers a little more than a century ago.

Image from a CT-N video feed.

This hour, on the last day of the legislative session we speak with a Connecticut state senator who has played a key role in issues of race and criminal justice, including a proposal to legalize recreational cannabis.

Did this session bring more fairness to people of color involved in the justice system?

Golden retriever lying on a blanket looks up at camera
Pixabay

Dogs are man’s best friend, but what’s really going on inside of their heads?

This hour, we talk with canine cognition researcher Brian Hare.

Hare runs Duke University’s Canine Cognition Center, and is the co-author of the new book: Survival of the Friendliest: Understanding Our Origins and Rediscovering Our Common Humanity.

Aequorea victoria
Sierra Blakely / Wikimedia Commons

Did you know 75 percent of animals in the ocean glow?

a copy of the book THE CHOSEN AND THE BEAUTIFUL lies next to a copy of THE GREAT GATSBY
Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby has dazzled readers for nearly a century. This year, 96 years after publication, The Great Gatsby has entered the public domain.

This hour, we talk with Gatsby expert Maureen Corrigan about the novel’s legacy.

Two wedding rings
Jeff Belmonte / Wikimedia

Love is what most people are looking for in a spouse or life partner. But this hour, we take a look at marriage, an institution that for much of history had very little to do with love at all.

We also talk about the right to end a marriage by divorce. And we want to hear from you, too.

Connecticut Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro.
(Ryan Caron King/Connecticut Public)

This hour, a member of Congress from Connecticut now holds a key post as House Chairwoman of the Appropriations Committee.  Rosa DeLauro will play a significant role in approving a federal budget, released by the president Friday.

And she oversees earmarks. Those are spending perks for lawmakers that some see as wasteful, but that others see as necessary to the legislative process. 

DeLauro’s new position could give her additional opportunities to continue her fight for a generous tax break to low-income families.

Photo of State Senator Dennis Bradley
Courtesy: Senate Democrats

Some see State Senator Dennis Bradley as a rising star in Bridgeport-area politics.

Now, he faces federal conspiracy and wire fraud charges.

Several politicians from Bridgeport have faced corruption charges in recent years. We talk with a community leader about the political culture in Connecticut’s ’s largest city.

We want to hear from you. Are you a Bridgeport resident? What’s your reaction to the arrest of Senator Bradley?

Glasses of beer sit on a counter
Pxhere

The world of craft beer is having its own #MeToo moment.

A wave of women working in the beer industry have shared stories of misogyny and sexual harassment in the workplace

This hour, we talk with women working in Connecticut’s craft beer industry and hear about the systemic changes needed to address these issues.

Do you work at or own a brewery in our state? We want to hear from you.

Still from the movie "Music" of actress Maddie Ziegler
HanWay Films

When the preview for musical artist Sia’s debut film Music was released---- it received backlash from individuals on the autism spectrum. But it also sparked a conversation about neurodiversity.

Image courtesy of CT-N.

This hour, State Senator Dennis Bradley is indicted in a campaign finance case and removed from his leadership post on the Public Safety Committee.  That committee had handled a major proposal to allow online gambling and sports betting. The bill was approved by the state senate last night. It heads to the governor's desk.

Meanwhile, negotiations are underway on a 2-year state budget. With Democrats holding the governor’s office and both houses of the General Assembly, is the GOP at the table?

Photo of Ada's headstone in Hartford, Connecticut. The inscription reads "Ada, Wife of William S. Brown, Died October 20, 1884, Age 32"
Eileen Newman

In 1884, a young Hartford woman named Ada Brown was murdered in her home.  It made national news, but Ada’s story faded into obscurity. This hour, we learn why a history class at University of Saint Joseph spent the past semester digging into her story, 136 years later.

And we learn what it meant to one of Ada’s descendants.

Gotham Coyote Project

Have you spotted a coyote in your neighborhood? These carnivores can live just about everywhere, from Canada to Central America, from California to -- just recently -- Long Island.

This hour, we talk with two researchers that study coyotes. We learn about how coyotes have expanded their range over the last 200 years to cover much of North America.

As other species have struggled to survive amidst human habitat destruction, why has the scrappy coyote been able to thrive?  We want to hear from you, too. Do you have coyotes in your town or city?

Do you like seeing them, or do you worry they will snag your cat for supper?

Witness Stones Project

How should we remember painful events in our history? There are more than 70 Witness Stones installed throughout our state. The markers commemorate the lives of the enslaved people that lived in Connecticut. 

A mother humpback and calf in a bay off Vava'u, Tonga. They'd joined a few thousand adult humpbacks in Antarctica during summer before returning to the South Pacific. Along the way young whales began to imitate adult feeding methods and other behaviors.
Brian Skerry / National Geographic

They are giants who live their whole lives underwater. In many ways, a whale’s life is completely alien to the human experience. Yet these ocean giants share some surprising similarities with us.

This hour, we talk with National Geographic underwater photographer Brian Skerry. His newest cover story for the magazine looks at the growing body of research on whale culture. 

Image from CT-N.

The General Assembly's Public Health Committee has handled some of the most emotional and hotly contested issues of the session. 

Lawmakers held a 24-hour public hearing filled by parents opposed to vaccines.  Some of those same parents rallied outside the state capitol as lawmakers voted to end religious exemptions to school vaccine requirements .

Some legislators on the panel choked up as they described their personal experiences with the loss of loved ones during debate on a failed bill that would have allowed terminally ill patients to request life-ending medication. 

The day before the show, the committee's leader presented a bill to the state Senate that promotes a different way of looking at racism -- As a public health crisis.  

This hour, we speak to that committee leader.

Photo of Digital Body Language Book sitting on top of a laptop
Tess Terrible / Connecticut Public

You’ve been working late and you just finished a big report that you sent off to your boss. And you received a one word reply back - "Thanks (period)." How does that make you feel? 

 

More and more of our communication takes place online - but our online language is not something we’ve learned. It’s still a new medium.

Roya Hakakian came to the US as a refugee from Iran when she was just a teenager.

Now, the Connecticut author and poet has drawn on her life story to create a “guidebook” about the immigrant experience.

This hour, Hakakian joins us to talk about her new book, A Beginner’s Guide To America.

We want to hear from you, too. How has the history and experience of immigration in your family shaped your experience as an American?

Illustration of overlapping speech bubbles
Gerd Altmann / PublicDomainPictures

We all communicate in our daily lives, but how do languages actually work?

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