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Morning Edition

Weekdays 5:00 am
  • Hosted by Steve Inskeep, David Greene, Noel King, Rachel Martin
  • Local Host Diane Orson

Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Editionhosted locally by WNPR's Diane Orson. 

NPR hosts Steve Inskeep, and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. They interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, and present stories from NPR correspondents around the world and WNPR reporters here at home. 

Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

Listen for the Marketplace Morning Report with David Brancaccio at 6:50 and 8:50 am for all of the latest business news and insight.

Ways to Connect

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How far will China go to keep its hold on Hong Kong?

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A Maryland bar is exploring ways to keep its dine-in customers social distancing. Its solution: "bumper tables."

In anticipation of its reopening, Fish Tales Bar & Grill in Ocean City commissioned tables for one that ensconce patrons in jumbo inner tubes. Diners, seated inside the wheeled tables, can scoot around and bump into each other from 6 feet apart in keeping with social distancing guidelines.

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Companies are bringing workers back. Some essential employees never stopped. NPR's Leila Fadel spent the morning on a Los Angeles public bus with one of them.

The United States is still losing jobs at an alarming pace two months after the coronavirus pandemic took hold.

Another 2.4 million people filed claims for unemployment last week, the Labor Department reported Thursday. That's down 249,000 — or 9% — from the previous week, but still painfully high by historical standards.

In the past nine weeks, jobless claims have totaled 38.6 million. That's roughly one out of every four people who were working in February, before the pandemic hit.

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NASA Seeks Participants For Isolation Study

May 21, 2020

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In Texas, as more businesses get the green light to reopen, those plans have been delayed in some areas where the governor says jump in positive COVID-19 cases follow ramped-up testing capacity.

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Here's what passes for good news when it comes to the economy right now. Jerome Powell, the chairman of the Federal Reserve, gave a sober economic forecast to "60 Minutes," but he said at least it's not as bad as the Great Depression.

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Here is how the president defended his decision to fire the State Department inspector general.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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The president is making his signature move against the World Health Organization.

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Sophie Avouris was a newborn in Greece when the 1918 influenza pandemic spread through Europe. Now, at 102, she has survived a coronavirus infection in a Manhattan rehabilitation center.

Not many people can say they have lived through both events.

"We just didn't think she would be able to make it," her daughter, Effie Strouthides, told NPR. "The doctor told us we couldn't come to visit her, but if it gets really serious and [toward] the end they would allow us to come and see her. So we were prepared for that."

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