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Waking up is hard to do, but it's easier with NPR's Morning Editionhosted locally by WNPR's Diane Orson. 

NPR hosts Steve Inskeep, and David Greene bring the day's stories and news to radio listeners on the go. They interview newsmakers from politicians, to academics, to filmmakers, and present stories from NPR correspondents around the world and WNPR reporters here at home. 

Morning Edition provides news in context, airs thoughtful ideas and commentary, and reviews important new music, books, and events in the arts. All with voices and sounds that invite listeners to experience the stories. Morning Edition is a world of ideas tailored to fit into your busy life.

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The Kentucky Attorney General investigating the death of Breonna Taylor in Louisville announced Wednesday he was charging one officer with firing recklessly. He declined to charge any officers with her death. NPR's Noel King speaks with state representative Charles Booker about the charges.

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Tanisha Long expects to be busy in the run up to the 2020 election.

For the next six weeks, Long, who founded an unofficial Black Lives Matter chapter for Pittsburgh and Southwestern Pennsylvania, plans to make get-out-the vote videos, host mail-in voting webinars and work to enfranchise eligible incarcerated people in order to turn out voters she says "no one's talking to anymore."

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Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. Bruce Springsteen says his new album might not have existed except for a fan.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LETTER TO YOU")

BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN: (Singing) ...My letter to you.

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Charles Henry Krebbs is one of more than 200,000 Americans who've died from COVID-19. He was a real estate broker and an appraiser in Maricopa County, Ariz. His daughter Tara Krebbs shared memories.

Chris Anderson, supervisor of elections in Seminole County, Florida, had a stylus problem.

He says it would have cost more than a quarter of a million dollars to purchase enough pens and styluses needed for the county's 328,000 voters. So, his department got creative.

Aaron, a Beijing native, spent the last seven years in the U.S., first as a high school student and now as a rising college senior in sociology — until he received an email from the U.S. State Department earlier this month.

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Every year, Stephen Lim and his colleagues at the University of Washington compile and analyze health data from every country on the planet to come up with a sort of global report card.

Year after year, one of the biggest success stories has been the vaccination of children.

"We've really seen this steady progress in increasing the fraction of children who are receiving ... in particular, the basic vaccines — diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis," Lim says.

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Whitney Moore Taylor, a second-grade teacher, was one of almost 200,000 Americans who have died of COVID-19. She was getting a counseling degree and also working in early childhood therapy. Her mom, Paris Thomas, says Whitney loved kids.

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So starting this Sunday, the mobile apps TikTok and WeChat will be banned from U.S. app stores. That was the announcement from the U.S. Commerce Department today. The Chinese-owned apps have been the target of the Trump administration. They say the apps collect data from American users that could be accessed by the Chinese government. A sale of TikTok has been in the works, but so far, no deal has been finalized. And let's turn to NPR's Bobby Allyn, who's been following this story. Good morning, Bobby.

BOBBY ALLYN, BYLINE: Hey, David.

The mother of Breonna Taylor says that if the police reforms announced this week by officials in Louisville were in place six months ago, her daughter might still be alive.

Taylor, a 26-year-old Black woman who worked as an emergency room technician, was fatally shot by Louisville police during a botched narcotics raid at her home during the early morning hours of March 13.

A decision on whether to bring charges against the three officers who carried out the raid is expected in the coming days.

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