Ray Hardman | Connecticut Public Radio
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Ray Hardman

Host/Reporter

Ray Hardman began his broadcasting career at WFSU in Tallahassee Florida where he served at different times as a producer, Operations manager, and Morning Edition host. Ray joined the WNPR staff in 1996, as a reporter and host. He later became the Music Director for WNPR, and in 2002 he went back to his newsy roots as the host of WNPR’s Morning Edition.

From 2002 to 2009 Ray divided his time between WNPR and CPTV, first serving as a correspondent on CPTV’s news magazine Main Street. He later became the host of Main Street, and from 2005 to 2009 was the host and producer for CPTV’s Front and Center with Ray Hardman.

Ray holds degrees from St. Mary's College of Maryland and Florida State University. In his spare time, Ray fronts a garage band called The Radiation. Ray lives in West Hartford with his wife Kathleen, and their sons Benjamin and Jackson. 

Ways to Connect

Connecticut's 2nd District representative Joe Courtney says the Trump administration's transfer of $3.6 billion from military construction projects to pay for more of the wall along the southern U.S. border sets a "dangerous and irresponsible" precedent. 

Noah Todd / Flock Theater

September 6th is the anniversary of the burning of New London during the Revolutionary War. British troops, under orders from former Patriot turned British loyalist Benedict Arnold looted and burned over 140 buildings in town.

In the decades following the incident, an effigy of Arnold was regularly paraded through town and ceremonially burned. The tradition eventually faded away, but in recent years a local theater company has stepped up to keep the ritual alive.

Niels van Eck / Creative Commons

Hartford is on a short list of cities being considered for one of the four presidential debates in 2020. To help Hartford's chances, The Hartford Foundation for Public Giving has pledged one million dollars to the Debate 2020 Local Organizing Committee if the city is selected.

Government of Prince Edward Island / Creative Commons

Fewer Connecticut kindergarteners are getting vaccinated for measles, mumps and rubella, and more students are getting religious exemptions for mandatory vaccines, new data shows.

Madyson Frame / NEXT

Officials from the National Park Service gave an update this week on the status of the Coltsville National Historical Park in Hartford, a tribute to Samuel Colt and his role in the firearms industry as well as the Industrial Revolution. Congress approved the park in 2014, but it's far from complete.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim is seeking reelection this fall. The Democrat will face state senator Marilyn Moore in the September 10th primary. 

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement / Flickr

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong is fighting recent immigration policy put forth by the Trump Administration.

Last week, Tong joined 17 other attorneys general in opposing the implementation of expedited removal. 

Courtesy: Planned Parenthood of Southern New England

Planned Parenthood of Southern New England has blasted a Trump administration rule which denies funding to healthcare providers who refer patients for abortions.

The funding comes from the federal Title X program, which provides family planning services such as contraceptives, testing for sexually transmitted infections and breast cancer screenings to low income residents. 

Library of Congress

The Connecticut State Library has been awarded a grant of over $263,000 from the National Digital Newspaper Program, a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress. The grant will be used to digitize Connecticut newspapers, and make them available online.

Ray Hardman / Connecticut Public Radio

Monarch butterflies famously migrate to Mexico in the winter, traveling along well established routes. One of those routes runs along the shoreline of Connecticut. An organic gardener whose mission is to increase the population of migrating monarchs will be in New Haven this weekend to show people how to raise and release these amazing creatures.

A phone with social media apps
Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A state lawmaker says a 9-year-old Connecticut girl was recently a target of child exploitation after downloading a popular social media app.

Santa Clara Weekly / Facebook

An accident earlier this summer at Bradley International Airport caused thousands of gallons of toxic chemicals to spill into the Farmington River. The aviation support company responsible for that accident was also involved in a similar incident in California in 2016.

In June, a faulty manual fire alarm in an airplane hangar at Bradley triggered the release of firefighting foam containing PFAS, a group of chemicals that are highly toxic, and hard to remove from the environment. An estimated 50,000 gallons of the foam eventually made its way into the Farmington River.

Connecticut Department of Energy and Enviromental Protection

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong says the state is working aggressively to deal with toxic chemicals known as PFAS in the Farmington River. In June, thousands of gallons of the chemicals were accidentally released into the Farmington near Bradley International airport.

On Thursday, Tong was joined by legislators and environmental officials at the banks of the Farmington River in Windsor near where the spill originated. He said before any action is taken, the state needs more information.

Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

Renowned Architect Cesar Pelli died last Friday at the age of 92. For Deborah Berke, Dean of the Yale School of Architecture, Pelli’s influence on the school and its faculty will be long lasting.

“I can't say enough what an extraordinarily lovely and generous human being Cesar Pelli was,” said Berke. “He cared about scholarship, he cared about students, and he cared passionately about architecture. He was an exceptional human.”

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Members of the Puerto Rican community in Connecticut are glued to the drama unfolding daily on the island, as protest leads to change in Puerto Rico's government.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The warmer weather often results in a spike in violent crime in Connecticut, and this summer is no exception. Now, the state says it will put some dollars behind efforts to curb violence in major cities. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Saturday, July 20th marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing. Several Connecticut companies played an important role in the historic mission.

82 year-old Donald Rethke was a mechanical engineer at Hamilton Standard in Windsor Locks in 1969. He helped design the life support systems and the heating system on the lunar module used in the moon landing.

Professor Bop / Creative Commons

It appears Connecticut -- along with the rest of the country -- was spared massive ICE raids over the weekend that had been promised by President Trump. But advocates for immigrants' rights say the administration's stance is still having a marked effect.

Hartford's Artists Collective is among the many arts organizations contributing to the Greater Hartford's "Arts Ecosystem"
Shana Sureck / WNPR

The Greater Hartford art scene is thriving in many ways, but challenges persist. That's the conclusion of a new comprehensive report.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A series of events in and around Hartford this Saturday night is expected to create major traffic headaches. But the Department of Transportation is reminding eventgoers that there are options out there besides getting in your car and contributing to the gridlock.

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library

Newly discovered papers from an 18th century Yale alumnus offer a fresh look at campus life during the Revolutionary War.

Keith Allison / Creative Commons

In a tweet earlier this week, President Trump wrote that Immigration and Customs Enforcement will soon begin deporting millions of undocumented citizens.

A recent accidental dump of firefighting foam into the Farmington River near Bradley International Airport has conservationists concerned.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Among the big-ticket items that did not pass in Connecticut's 2019 legislative session were tolls and legal cannabis. While tolls will likely be debated in a special session this summer, proponents of recreational marijuana will have to regroup and wait until next year.

A Fidelco guide dog wearing a harness
Tikeyah Whittle / Connecticut Public Radio

Read a transcript of  this show here.

This hour, guest host Ray Hardman takes you to Fidelco -- the guide dog school in Bloomfield, Connecticut where we meet some guide dogs in training.  And we talk with guide dog users about the impact these animals have on their lives.

We also speak with author and poet Stephen Kuusisto, who’s written a memoir about his first guide dog, Corky.   

Ray Hardman / Connecticut Public Radio

For over two decades, The Connecticut Art Trail has been a fun way for people to explore the state’s many and varied museums. The Arts Trail started as the Connecticut Impressionist Trail, but has expanded over the years to include a wider range of museums.

Carlos Mejia / Connecticut Public Radio

Two recent police shootings in Connecticut have brought issue of tensions between police and the public -- particularly communities of color -- front and center. Connecticut Public Radio's Where We Live team hosted a community conversation in Hartford recently, aimed at airing some of those issues.

A poster offering a $2,500 reward for information about the burning of a New Haven mosque lay in the mosque's parking lot on May 14, 2019.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

New Haven fire and police officials say a two-alarm fire at the Diyanet Mosque on Middletown Avenue on Sunday was intentionally set. 

Rhoda Baer/National Cancer Institute / Creative Commons

The state Department of Public Health has made public the number of unvaccinated children attending every school in the state. But some of the numbers have already been disputed as inaccurate. 

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