Lucy Nalpathanchil | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

Lucy Nalpathanchil

Host of "Where We Live"

Lucy is the host of WNPR's popular talk show, "Where We Live," a 2018 winner of two national awards from Public Radio News Directors, Inc., or PRNDI.  Lucy and her team were awarded second place in the categories of "Call In Program" and "Interview.

She's been a public radio journalist for more than 20 years covering everything from education to immigration, juvenile justice and child welfare issues to veterans' affairs and the military. Her reporting has taken her to all sorts of places including a nausea inducing ride aboard a Coast Guard boat in Florida and to Tambacounda, Senegal to talk with women journalists and farmers.

Lucy moved to Connecticut in 2006 to become WNPR's Assignment Editor.

She's also been local host for mid-day programming and for "All Things Considered."

She contributes to National Public Radio and her stories have aired on several national NPR shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Weekend All Things Considered, Here and Now, and Latino USA.  

During her time in Connecticut, Lucy has focused on immigration including New Haven's controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the Becoming American series: stories of immigrants and the citizenship process.  In 2011, Lucy launched the Coming Home Project to tell the stories of returning Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans in transition. To learn more about the military, Lucy was chosen to take part in a week-long training for journalists hosted by the U.S Army at Fort Leavenworth, KS and Fort Leonard Woods, MO. Getting up at 3:30 am to participate in boot camp was most memorable! 

In 2014, she was selected to join military reporters around the country for a conference hosted by the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative in Washington D.C.

Lucy has worked in several states as a public radio reporter after beginning her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. She's received awards from Pennsylvania's Golden Quill, the New York State Associated Press, the Mayor's Asian American Advisory Board in Jacksonville, Florida, the Connecticut Associated Press and the state's Society for Professional Journalists chapter.

When she's not in the newsroom, Lucy enjoys traveling, hiking, and planning her next garden. She and her husband, Jason live in Suffield with their two children and a small zoo.

Ways to Connect

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With the change in season, many birds that headed south over the winter are coming back to the northeast. This hour, we sit down with Connecticut’s state ornithologist. 

It’s the time of year birds are finding mates and raising chicks. What behaviors should we be on the lookout for?

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Spring has arrived, transforming Connecticut’s landscape into a vibrant canvas of yellows, pinks, whites, and greens. For gardeners, the season signals a return to the outdoors; a new opportunity to cultivate the soil and tend to rows of berries, herbs, and flowering trees.

This hour, join us as we talk all things spring gardening with Connecticut Garden Journal host Charlie Nardozzi. Do you have a question about your backyard beds or community garden plot? We want to hear from you. 

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Bulimia. Anorexia. Binge-eating. You have likely heard of these eating disorders before. But what are they, really? And who do they affect?

This hour, we talk with advocates and experts in the field, and we also hear from you. Have you or has someone close to you suffered from an eating disorder? Where did you turn for help? 

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ElleMarie ClaireCosmopolitan. For generations, magazines such as these have informed the world's women, serving as fashion manuals, as well as vestibules between the conventional and taboo.

This hour, we look back on the history of these publications, and talk about the challenges faced by many women's magazines today. 

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Literacy. It's something many of us take for granted. The ability to read health forms, headlines, or the latest bestsellers. Yet, across the U.S., there are millions of adults who have difficulty reading.

This hour, we find out why. We talk with literacy experts and advocates, and we also hear from you.

Measles, mumps and rubella vaccines are seen at the Rockland County Health Department in Pomona, N.Y., Wednesday, March 27, 2019.
Seth Wenig / Associated Press

Painful rashes, diarrhea, even possibly blindness or deadly brain inflammation -- these are all symptoms of measles. Before researchers developed a vaccine, this disease once affected millions in the U.S. and hospitalized tens of thousands every year.

Thanks to the vaccine, measles was eliminated from this country two decades ago. Yet today, communities in New York and Washington state are experiencing devastating outbreaks today. This hour, we ask why is a virulent, deadly, but entirely preventable disease reappearing in the U.S.?

Chion Wolf / WNPR, Connecticut Public Radio

From the bestselling author of Lilac Girls comes a new novel. It's called Lost Roses and it centers on Eliza Ferriday, a one-time Connecticut resident and mother of esteemed philanthropist Caroline Ferriday.

This hour, author Martha Hall Kelly returns to our studios to talk about the book, and about her experience researching war and revolution in the early 20th century. 

Scott Wallace

Journalist and author Scott Wallace has dedicated years to documenting the so-called "unconquered" tribes of South America. This hour, we sit down with Wallace who, in addition to traveling and writing, is a professor of journalism at the University of Connecticut.

We walk along the path that guided Wallace into the thick of the Amazon, and learn about the issues threatening the forest's most isolated people today. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

What’s it like to build a house, a family, a life… and then have a war take it all away?  

This hour we sit down with West Hartford, Connecticut residents Adeebah Alnemar and her son, Naji Aldabaan. They’re Syrian refugees who fled during the civil war, and came to Connecticut in 2016.

Their family is the subject of a 2018 Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoon series in The New York Times. We also talk with one of the people behind the cartoon series—New Haven-based journalist Jake Halpern.

Pxhere

Where does your food come from? Most of us go to the grocery store to buy produce, dairy, and meat. And these items aren’t necessarily local; they may come from hundreds or thousands of miles away.

This hour we hear how more people are getting involved in producing the food they eat. It’s called “modern homesteading.”

We hear from two Connecticut residents who’ve tried this practice. What drove them to pursue homesteading? And what barriers exist for Connecticut residents who want to live off the land? We find out.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Between War & Here is a one-of-a-kind collaboration, which serves not only as a reminder of the U.S.' ongoing involvement in war, but also as a lens into the complexities of U.S. veterans' experiences.

This hour, we sit down with one of the creative forces behind the show and hear from one of its narrators: longtime foreign correspondent Anne Garrels.

Plus, we learn about an event at the Mystic Seaport Museum, which spotlights women in the maritime industry. 

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With recreational marijuana on sale in Massachusetts, Connecticut lawmakers are looking at legalizing recreational cannabis more seriously than ever.

Pxhere

We all need fresh water to survive, yet it's so ubiquitous most of us barely spare it a thought in our daily lives. This hour we take a look at the state of water in our country, from rivers and streams to the water that comes out of our taps.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Just days after the U.S. Attorney General released his summary of the long-anticipated Mueller report, we ask: What does his sum-up do -- or not do -- to trust in the country's election system? We talk with a panel of reporters and election experts, and we also hear from you. 

Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

Have you taken a ride on the bright red Hartford Line? The commuter rail service debuted last summer, a recent project of the Connecticut Department of Transportation.

But rail is just one mode of transportation in a state known for congestion and aging infrastructure.

This hour, we sit down with new DOT Commissioner Joseph Giulietti. Giulietti is a Connecticut native, who most recently served as President of Metro North.

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Listen live on Monday at 9:00 am.

job while also raising a family.

This hour, we take a deep dive into the realities of modern-day motherhood. We talk with a sociologist who spent years in the field interviewing working moms. We also get a local perspective, and we want to hear from you. 

View of a forest from above
Geran de Klerk / Wikimedia Commons

From dying coral reefs to fires and coastal flooding, the effects of climate change are already being felt around the world. And it will only get worse.

A 2018 report from climate scientists from around the globe found that some of climate change’s disastrous consequences will be in full force if Earth’s temperature rises past 1.5 degrees--something that could happen as early as 2040 at current emissions rates.

Carlos Mejia / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Venture into one New London, Connecticut nonprofit and you will find yourself surrounded by art. Not just any art, either. Art inspired by the rich cultures of Latin America.

This hour, we go inside Expressiones Cultural Center. We meet up with one of the nonprofit's co-founders, and wander through the mind of its current artist in residence: a forestry engineer from Lima, Peru. 

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Today, there are 5.8 million Americans who are impacted by Alzheimer’s disease. That number is expected to grow by more than half.

Yet how do we know the right questions to ask to get a timely diagnosis in order to plan for the future? We hear from advocates who want to see additional training for primary care physicians so they recognize the signs of dementia earlier.

Taylin Santiago, a New London High School student who identifies as Afro-Latino, testified in front of the Education Committee during a public hearing about H.B. 7082.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Do you remember high school history? The subject has the reputation of being “boring”, thick with names and dates that can be a chore to remember. But this hour we ask: How do the history lessons we learn in school shape the way we see the world around us?

Susan Campbell

In her new book, author Susan Campbell transports readers through time, telling the story of Hartford's once industry-rich neighborhood, Frog Hollow.

This hour, we sit down with Campbell. We ask about her research for the book and learn about the realities of life in Frog Hollow today.

Do you have a personal connection to the neighborhood? We want to hear from you, too. 

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What would you do with all that time if you didn't have to drive during your daily commute?

This hour: like it or not, autonomous vehicles (AVs) will be a major part of our not-too-distant transportation future. We take a look at some of the promises and challenges of automating vehicles and ask what they will mean for the cities of our future.

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In southeastern Connecticut, a team of Recovery Navigators is offering a hand -- and a sense of hope -- to residents with opioid drug addiction. This hour, we take an in-depth look at the work this team is doing.

We also hear why some municipal leaders -- including the mayor of New London, Connecticut -- are championing legislation that would grant municipalities the right to sue big pharma over the ongoing opioid crisis.

And finally, when it comes to Medicaid insurance, why are certified nurse midwives in Connecticut reimbursed at a lower rate than OB/GYN physicians? We take a closer look with Connecticut Public Radio health care reporter Nicole Leonard, and we also hear from you. 

Cathy Malin / RiverQuest

They are one of our most recognizable national symbols, but have you ever seen a bald eagle in the wild? This hour we head out of the studio and into the field to see these birds of prey in their natural habitat--right here in Connecticut! We take you along with us on a Winter Wildlife Eagle Cruise down the Connecticut River to view these majestic birds, who nearly faced extinction in this state just a few decades ago.  

And we learn about another fish-eating raptor that is thriving on our waters today. Have you ever seen an osprey on Connecticut’s shoreline?

Ken Hawkins / Creative Commons

Bulimia. Anorexia. Binge-eating. You have likely heard of these eating disorders before. But what are they, really? And who do they affect?

This hour, we talk with advocates and experts in the field, and we also hear from you. Have you or has someone close to you suffered from an eating disorder? Where did you turn for help? 

Katie Harp / Pexels

Do you have credit card debt hanging over your head? Or maybe you've been thinking you should start saving for retirement, but you aren’t sure how to pay for it?

This hour we sit down with NPR correspondent Chris Arnold, who covers personal finance and consumer protection. NPR’s new family of podcasts, Life Kit, gives listeners practical tips for navigating life challenges from parenting to healthy eating. Arnold hosts Life Kit’s podcasts about money. They are all about figuring out how to get your finances in order in a fun and approachable way.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

It's been nearly two months since Ned Lamont was sworn in as Connecticut's 89th governor. 

Elements of his budget proposal, released last month, are being opposed by many segments of the state's population.

Pixabay

A nursing home’s role is to care for its patients, not compromise their health. Yet, across Connecticut, a number of facilities have come up short in fulfilling this most basic function.

This hour, we take an in-depth look at this issue. We talk with reporters, regulators, and advocates, and we also hear from you. 

Kris Notaro / Creative Commons

An estimated 20 percent of Americans reside in rural communities. What are the needs of this population? And to what extent are those needs being met? This hour, we take a closer look.

We also sit down with Anne Torsiglieri, whose one-woman show "A" Train comes to Hartford this week. 

Image of twenty dollar bills
Martin Vorel / Libreshot

Progressive lawmakers around the country have been rallying behind a call for a $15 minimum wage, and Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont has joined their ranks.

This hour, what would increasing the minimum wage by almost 150 percent over the next four years mean for businesses and workers here in Connecticut? We hear from an economist and get the takes of several local business owners on Democrats’ proposal to increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2023.

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