Lucy Nalpathanchil | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

Lucy Nalpathanchil

Host of "Where We Live"

Lucy is the Executive Producer and Host of WNPR's popular talk show, Where We Live.  

The show goes beyond news headlines and interviews with policy-makers. Where We Live features conversations about Connecticut and highlights the stories of its residents. In 2020, Lucy received a national Gracies Award from the Alliance for Women in Media for her conversation with a Connecticut mother and her trans-son. 

In 2018, Where We Live received two national awards from Public Media Journalists Association, formerly known as Public Radio News Directors, Inc., or PRNDI.  Lucy and her team were awarded second place in the categories of "Call In Program" and "Interview.

She also hosts the weekly news roundtable, The Wheelhouse.

Lucy has been a public radio journalist for more than 20 years covering everything from education to immigration, juvenile justice and child welfare issues to veterans' affairs and the military. Her reporting has taken her to all sorts of places including a nausea inducing ride aboard a Coast Guard boat in Florida and to Tambacounda, Senegal to talk with women journalists and farmers.

She moved to Connecticut in 2006 to become WNPR's Assignment Editor.

She's also been local host for mid-day programming and for All Things Considered.

She contributes to National Public Radio and her stories have aired on several national NPR shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Weekend All Things Considered, Here and Now, and Latino USA.  

During her time in Connecticut, Lucy has focused on immigration including New Haven's controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the Becoming American series: stories of immigrants and the citizenship process.  In 2011, Lucy launched the Coming Home Project to tell the stories of returning Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans in transition. To learn more about the military, Lucy was chosen to take part in a week-long training for journalists hosted by the U.S Army at Fort Leavenworth, KS and Fort Leonard Woods, MO. Getting up at 3:30 am to participate in boot camp was most memorable! 

In 2014, she was selected to join military reporters around the country for a conference hosted by the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative in Washington D.C.

Lucy has worked in several states as a public radio reporter after beginning her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. She's received awards from Pennsylvania's Golden Quill, the New York State Associated Press, the Mayor's Asian American Advisory Board in Jacksonville, Florida, the Connecticut Associated Press and the state's Society for Professional Journalists chapter.

When she's not in the newsroom, Lucy enjoys traveling, hiking, and planning her next garden. She and her husband, Jason, live in Suffield with their two children and a small zoo.

Ways to Connect

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What challenges do people with criminal records face when re-entering society? What is Connecticut doing to help prior offenders reintegrate? 

This hour: we discuss challenges faced after leaving prison. This includes finding gainful employment, getting an education and even finding a place to live.

Xiaphias / Wikimedia Commons

Spend just a few minutes with young children and you’ll marvel at their imagination. Maybe they’re pretending to be a dragon running a bakery, or they’re coloring the sky purple instead of blue. But somewhere along the way, most of those kids turn into adults who say, “I’m just not a creative person!”

This hour, we ask: how can we foster children’s imaginations? What is creativity, anyway? We talk with psychologists and art teachers to explore what we can do to keep our kids, families, and society inspired by a lifelong curiosity for the arts.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

She started as a social worker in Connecticut more than two decades ago. Now, Vannessa Dorantes is the Commissioner of the state’s Department of Children and Families (DCF). This hour, we sit down with Commissioner Dorantes. What questions do you have for the leader of DCF?

Tucker Ives / Connecticut Public Radio

Aired live February 5, 2019

Cities and towns have laws to keep people from engaging in behavior that may disturb others, like sleeping on park benches, drinking in public, or just plain “loitering”.

What does it mean when just hanging out in a public space puts you in violation of these laws?

Debby Shapiro

Aired live October 24, 2019

Middletown today is known for its vibrant main street and the scenic grounds of Wesleyan University.

But the city began as a trading port on the Connecticut River, and from its founding, much of the wealth that came into that port was tied to the transatlantic slave trade. This hour, we hear about a new UNESCO memorial that has brought recognition to that city’s role in slavery.

We also learn about members of a historic African American family in that cit

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Aired live May 21, 2019

Donald Collins first told his mom he was transgender when he was a senior in high school. His mother wasn’t totally sure what the word transgender even meant. From there, they began a difficult emotional journey as Donald began his transition.

This hour, we sit down with Donald and his mother, Mary Collins. They have written about their experience in the book At the Broken Places: A Mother and Trans Son Pick Up the Pieces. We ask them how they rebuilt their relationship and what lessons they hope to share with other families.

Have you or a loved one come out as transgender? We want to hear from you.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Aired live January 3, 2019

When Rabbi Philip Lazowski was just eleven years old, Nazis invaded his hometown and began the mass slaughter of Jewish residents.

Connecticut Prepares for Coronavirus

Mar 6, 2020
U.S. Army Photo / Department of Defense

What do you need to know to prepare for a coronavirus outbreak in our state? 

This hour, medical doctors join us to answer your questions. We learn how Connecticut residents can protect themselves and their families against coronavirus, and what researchers are doing to identify a vaccine.

We also discuss how employers should prepare. Is your workplace talking about coronavirus and what to do if there’s a potential outbreak?

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

March Madness begins in a couple of weeks, a favorite time of year for people who love watching college basketball. But if you want to legally place bets on your favorite team, inside Connecticut you’re out of luck.

This hour: will the General Assembly legalize sports betting this legislative session?

Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s tax season. Filing taxes can be a complicated and intimidating process. And ProPublica has found that big names in e-filing, like TurboTax, are actually making it more difficult for Americans to file easily and free of charge. This hour, we talk with a reporter behind the investigation, and find out whether you can file your taxes for free.

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Listen Monday at 9:00 am.

Deaths related to alcohol have been rising over the past two decades, especially among women.  Today, we look at the impact of alcohol on public health.

And in January 1920, Prohibition went into effect around the country, making it illegal to sell alcohol. One century after the beginning of this national experiment, we ask: what is a productive policy approach today to dealing with addiction?

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

This November, 32 million Latinos will be eligible to vote in the 2020 election, making them the largest minority voting bloc in the United States, according to the Pew Research Center. But Latinos are a diverse electorate—with roots from more than two dozen countries. 

This hour, what are President Trump and the Democrats doing right now to reach these voters?

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Lori Jackson feared for her life, so she got a temporary restraining order against her husband. But he was still able to legally buy a handgun, which he used to kill Jackson.

This hour, we talk about the legal gaps that allow some domestic abusers to purchase firearms.

Renty -- an enslaved man whose photograph was commissioned by Harvard professor Louis Agassiz in 1850.
Courtesy of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University

When Tamara Lanier’s mother died in 2010, the Norwich, Connecticut, resident remembered a promise she made to her: to document who her ancestors were.

Lanier says she grew up hearing her mother’s stories about her great-great-great grandfather, Papa Renty, an African-born enslaved man in South Carolina.

Diliff / Wikimedia Commons

Listen Tuesday at 9:00 am.

Amid the constant discussion of Connecticut residents leaving the state, the shoreline may soon be home to five new residents: Beluga whales. 

Mystic Aquarium has petitioned the federal government for permission to import five captive belugas to join its wildlife on display. Mystic says the move would help research to aid conservation efforts. But critics say the proposal is not only hazardous for the whales but also against US law.

Carmen Baskauf / Connecticut Public Radio

Listen Monday at 9:00 am.

They grew up during a digital revolution, two foreign wars, and a devastating financial crisis.  Now, millennials are beginning to come into political power, and those formative experiences shaping them into a different kind of politician than found in past generations.

This hour, we talk with TIME national political correspondent Charlotte Alter. Her new book is called “The Ones We’ve Been Waiting For: How a New Generation of Leaders Will Transform America.” We learn--about the forces that have shaped millennials’ unique political experience and what this  means for the future of the country.

Staff Sgt. James L. Harper Jr. / U.S. Air Force

From veterans returning from Iraq, to survivors of mass shootings, to those putting together the pieces after a hurricane--we know that the emotional and psychological scars of violence and tragedies sometimes last even longer than physical wounds.

But what is the psychological toll on those who help victims of traumatic experiences?

Chion Wolf/Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This summer marks 100 years since women achieved the right to vote. Yet women still are underrepresented in political office, both nationally and in the Connecticut General Assembly. This hour, a conversation with a panel of experts and women lawmakers. We ask: what barriers remain for women who are considering seeking office?

Join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.

Renty – an enslaved man whose photograph was commissioned by Harvard professor Louis Agassiz in 1850.
Courtesy of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Harvard University

 

Norwich, CT resident Tamara Lanier believes she is the descendant of two enslaved people—Renty and his daughter, Delia. They were photographed in 1850 for Harvard professor Louis Agassiz, as part of his research to advance the racist theory that Africans had different origins from Europeans. Lanier wants those early photographs, and has sued Harvard for “wrongful seizure, possession and expropriation” of them. 

Jeff Belmonte / Wikimedia

Valentine's Day is around the corner, which means it’s the season for chocolates and cheesy Hallmark cards.

Love is what most people are looking for in a spouse or life partner. But this hour, we take a look at marriage, an institution that for much of history had very little to do with love at all.

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The death of a pet can be devastating --yet when you lose an animal companion--you’re sometimes expected to “just get over it.”  This hour, we talk about human attachment to pets. Have you experienced the death of a beloved animal? How comfortable were you talking about your grief with others?

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What’s it like being a dad in 2020? On the next Where We Live, we’ll talk about social expectations for fathers as caregivers, and the impact an involved father has on the entire family, emotionally and financially. Are you a father? We want to hear from you.

Mike Mozart / Flickr

How often do you buy new clothing?

Stores like H&M and Forever 21 sell new styles at low prices, making it easy to constantly update your wardrobe. But, this hour: the environmental and social costs of "fast fashion". 

From unsafe garment factories to pollution in rivers, we hear about impacts of the fashion industry from journalist Jasmin Malik Chua.

JJBers / CreativeCommons.org

Anyone who’s spent time outdoors in Connecticut has probably come across a dam or two. The state is home to more than 4,000 dams, a dozen of which were spotlighted in a recent national dam safety investigation by The Associated Press.

This hour, we take an in-depth look at this investigation. What do its findings tell us about the integrity of the nation’s dam infrastructure? And how are states like Connecticut working to address dam safety? 

BoyuZhang1998 / Wikimedia Commons

It’s a busy week in politics. The presidential primary season kicked off in Iowa, and tonight is the President’s State of the Union Address. Meanwhile, the impeachment trial nears its end. This hour, Southern Connecticut State University political scientist Jennifer Hopper joins us.  

Russ / CreativeCommons.org

Standardized tests, application forms, campus visits. The path to college can be a daunting one, especially when you add tuition to the mix. Then, of course, there is the cost of room and board, meal plans, textbooks...feeling stressed yet?

This hour, we tackle the realities of affording a college education, and we also hear from you. Are you the parent of a college-age student? Are you, yourself, working toward a college degree? How has this impacted you financially...emotionally? 

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Paul J. Fusco

Have you noticed fewer sparrows or warblers flitting about your backyard? Bird populations in North America have been declining for years, but in 2019, the data was particularly grim. Two-thirds of bird species are at risk of extinction due to climate change and urbanization, according to recent studies. What does that mean for Connecticut’s birds?

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Wanjiku Gatheru is the daughter of Kenyan immigrants and a first-generation American. Now, the UConn senior has made university history as the school’s first-ever Rhodes Scholar.

The State of Connecticut

The 2017 Tax Cuts and Jobs Act introduced a new initiative, the Opportunity Zones Program, to spur investment in the nation’s most distressed communities. The state of Connecticut is home to 72 Opportunity Zones. What efforts are being made to attract investors to these regions? This hour, we find out, and we also hear from you. Do you live in or near an Opportunity Zone? 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Sheff v. O’Neill, the landmark desegregation case in Connecticut, has shaped school systems in the greater Hartford region for decades. The state of Connecticut has announced it reached a settlement with the plaintiffs. This hour, we hear more from CT Mirror education reporter Jacqueline Rabe Thomas.

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