Frankie Graziano | Connecticut Public Radio
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Frankie Graziano

If you read any of Frankie Graziano’s previous biographies, they’d be all about his passion for sports. But times change – and he’s a family man now.

Part of the reason for the biographical “tone-change” is a slight deviation in Frankie’s career path. In 2016, he moved over to news from the sports world. He became a Connecticut Public reporter. And that’s currently where he works as a breaking news reporter.

He’s been on-the-scene to get state residents the latest available information on major local happenings over the past four years – like the vintage plane crash at Bradley International Airport in 2019 and the recent landmark police accountability legislation that passed through the state capitol.

Other highlights from his time at Connecticut Public include some long-term storytelling he was able to do after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico in 2017, which led thousands of evacuees from the island to escape to Connecticut.

Frankie also played a crucial role in the  station’s continuing coverage of a police shooting in Wethersfield. Anthony Jose Vega Cruz, 18, died two days after being shot by former Wethersfield police officer Layau Eulizier Jr. on April 20, 2019. Much of this work went into Collision Course, a 2020 New England Emmy award-winning documentary produced by Vanessa de la Torre.  You can also hear Frankie’s national stories on NPR -- including one that was produced out of his basement about sports in the age of COVID-19.

Prior to going to work for Connecticut Public, Frankie produced over 1,200 hours of sports content for Connecticut Public Television and CPTV Sports. There, he worked to showcase thousands of local student-athletes -- whether it be during state championship events broadcast live on television or if they’d been honored with the network’s statewide UChoose Student-Athlete of the Week. He also put together a “Tip-Off Classic” featuring Connecticut’s top boys and girls high school basketball squads.

Frankie graduated from the University of Connecticut in 2011 with a bachelor’s degree in Journalism and History. While in school, he created a program on UConn’s student television station. He also interned at WFSB Eyewitness News Ch. 3. He covered collegiate baseball in Torrington during the summer.

Frankie is the husband of Colleen Graziano, APRN. He’s also “Daddy” to Charlie and Annie. They live in Glastonbury; Frankie (born Francesco Graziano Jr.) is originally from Torrington. His parents are from Italia: his mother Rosa Maria emigrated to America in 1967 and his father Francesco Sr. made his move to the United States shortly after marrying “Rosie” in 1975.

Allison Minto / Connecticut Public


Advocates for transgender student-athletes marched at Glastonbury High School Friday to protest a lawsuit brought by a recent alum.

Chris Rakoczy / Hartford Hospital

Cliff O’Connell’s future was once pretty murky. By 2019, he’d had kidney disease for 14 years.

Connecticut guard Paige Bueckers (5) reacts after getting fouled during the second half of a women's Final Four NCAA college basketball tournament semifinal game against Arizona Friday, April 2, 2021, at the Alamodome in San Antonio.
Eric Gay / AP Photo

Make it five years without a national title for the most decorated women’s college basketball team in America.

The University of Connecticut women’s basketball team -- the top-rated program in the country -- was stunned Friday night in the Final Four of the NCAA Tournament, losing 69-59 to Arizona.

UConn shot poorly and faced some physical defense in the loss, and freshman Paige Bueckers -- the Associated Press national player of the year -- fought hard to get her 18 points.

The University of Connecticut Women’s Basketball team’s game against Arizona Friday at 9:30pm will mark the team's 13th consecutive Final Four. For coach Geno Auriemma’s it’s his 21st. In a pandemic, he says this one is unlike any other.

“There’s been more time for the team’s to kind of get their breath, settle in, and kind of just stay in the routine that they were in," he said, "so in that sense, it doesn’t feel like you’re flying in and all the hoopla of the Final Four.”

The University of Connecticut Women’s Basketball team is going to the Final Four for the 13th straight year.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

East Windsor town officials want to know why the future of their casino project is being shoehorned into sports betting legislation.

Ned Lamont, Kamala Harris
Mark Mirko / The Hartford Courant

Vice President Kamala Harris arrived in Connecticut Friday afternoon and spent time in New Haven to promote the latest round of federal coronavirus relief.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Hartford’s school superintendent is recalling teachers and students to the classroom beginning Monday. But two local teachers unions, who say they found out about the return date the same day as parents and students, think it’s too early.

Ahjané Forbes / Connecticut Public

With the state recently opening up its COVID-19 vaccine program to Connecticut residents who are 45 to 54 years old, more people are now in the queue to get shots.

But some people are finding they don’t have to get in line.

Courtesy: UConn

UConn women’s basketball head coach Geno Auriemma has tested positive for COVID-19. The program announced that the Hall of Famer has no symptoms and is now isolating at home. Auriemma has had both of his COVID vaccination shots, but he had only just gotten the second dose five days ago, so he was nine days from being considered fully protected from the virus.

Connecticut AFL-CIO (Screengrab)

Essential workers infected by the coronavirus want Connecticut’s workers’ compensation system updated to meet their needs.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

On Monday, at least 100 yellow signs popped up on a lawn freshly emerged from snow, just off Route 1 in Greenwich. The phrase “Isolation Kills, Too” was written on them.

Frank Franklin II / Associated Press

A lawsuit filed by a Connecticut woman over images of enslaved people has been dismissed by a Massachusetts judge. Tamara Lanier sued Harvard University two years ago to force the release of the rights to pictures of two people she says are her enslaved ancestors.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

Stakeholders in Connecticut’s gaming expansion are waiting in anticipation as the state tries to work out an agreement with a second tribal nation on sports betting and iGaming. And one of those stakeholders hopes the state will not forget about gamblers who may be hurt by the plan to put a way to bet in everyone’s pocket.

Cloe Poisson / CT Mirror

After years of private negotiations with the two tribal nations who operate casinos in Connecticut, the state has reached an agreement with at least one of them on legalized sports betting.

CT-N (Screengrab)

The state of Connecticut and the Mohegan tribal nation are close to announcing an agreement on expanded gaming.

The deal could include a license to operate sports betting in Connecticut -- once it is legalized.

Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

Connecticut’s vaccine supply is about to get a big boost with the arrival of the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine. The federal Food and Drug Administration could approve the new vaccine for emergency use as soon as Friday. And if it does, Gov. Ned Lamont says the state will get 30,000 doses next week.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Wethersfield’s police chief is retiring several months after he was placed on paid leave for interfering with a town manager’s investigation of two police sergeants.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

The city of Hartford and St. Francis Hospital have teamed up to get people vaccinated at multiple neighborhood spots.

Yehyun Kim / CT Mirror

When Gov. Ned Lamont got his first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine earlier this week, he asked local leaders to go to communities of color and tell them to “step up and do the right thing.”

Morrowlong / Creative Commons

The Hole in the Wall Gang Camp in Ashford, founded by actor Paul Newman in the 1980s, gives seriously ill children a chance to have some fun and build lasting happy memories. This past weekend, a fire devastated the camp. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

As Gov. Ned Lamont rolls out his budget proposals for the coming biennium, education funding seems poised to become a battleground. Lamont wants to freeze the state’s contribution to public schools, the pot of money called Education Cost Sharing, or ECS. Instead, he would boost districts by using federal coronavirus funds. And that’s raising alarm among educators and advocates.

David Wurtzel / Connecticut Public

Gov. Ned Lamont this week announced he’ll end an executive order that had extended civil immunity to Connecticut nursing homes and long-term care facilities during the pandemic.

A memorial takes shape on a telephone pole near the site where 26-year-old Yale forestry graduate student Kevin Jiang was shot and killed in the Goatville section of New Haven’s East Rock neighborhood.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

The shooting death of a Yale University graduate student is being highlighted by New Haven officials as part of a recent rash of gun violence in the city.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

New state data revealing town-by-town COVID-19 vaccination coverage shows that the rollout in some areas of Connecticut is happening at a faster rate than in others.

The preliminary numbers confirm what some public health experts and health equity advocates have suspected all along, which is that vulnerable and underserved communities, including Black and brown neighborhoods already suffering high infection and mortality rates, are at risk of falling through the cracks. 

More than half of all people in Connecticut who died from COVID-19 in the first wave of the disease lived in nursing homes or assisted living facilities. Advocates for the elderly want to know whether someone should be held accountable for those deaths -- so they’re asking Gov. Ned Lamont to stop shielding the homes from legal action.

CT-N (Screengrab)

On Thursday, a legislative committee took up the permanent appointment for acting Connecticut Department of Correction Commissioner Angel Quiros.

UConn Men's Basketball has announced the team won't play indefinitely after it was notified of a coronavirus exposure. A person who officiated at the team's recent game with Butler tested positive for COVID-19. The school says it won’t compete with outside opponent “until it is deemed safe by medical professionals.” The team was scheduled to play Villanova University Thursday and St. John's University Sunday, Now those games will mark their ninth and 10th COVID-19-related cancellation or postponement. The team will enter what it's calling a modified quarantine.

Dave Wurtzel / Connecticut Public

From living rooms and Zoom rooms, Connecticut watched as Joe Biden was sworn in Wednesday as America’s 46th president.

Hartford Police

Some are looking at the 2021 legislative session in Connecticut as an opportunity to turn back major police reform adopted last year in the wake of George Floyd’s killing by a Minneapolis police officer.

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