Diane Orson | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

Diane Orson

Host

Diane Orson is WNPR's local host for Morning Edition.  She's also a reporter for WNPR, as well as a contributor to National Public Radio. Her stories are heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here And Now.  Diane began at WBUR in Boston and came to Connecticut in 1988 as a co-producer for Open Air New England. She shared a Peabody Award with Faith Middleton for their piece of radio nostalgia about New Haven's Shubert Theater. Her reporting has  been recognized by the Connecticut Society for Professional Journalists and the Associated Press, including the Ellen Abrams Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism and the Walt Dibble Award for Overall Excellence.

Diane is also an active professional musician. She lives in Hamden with her husband and two children.

Hank Bolden is an 83-year-old undergraduate at the Hartt School of Music in Connecticut. He is also an atomic vet — one of thousands of soldiers exposed to secret nuclear weapons tests during the Cold War.

Bolden is one of only a few African-Americans still here to tell the story.

In 1955, Bolden was in his late teens and stationed in California. One day he was told he'd been chosen to participate in a special military exercise. "I had no idea what I was selected for," he said.

Nestled in the Irving S. Gilmore Music Library at Yale University is an audio and video collection featuring many of the major musical figures of our time. 

The Oral History of American Music includes interviews with a wide range of musical figures, from Charles Ives to Laurie Anderson.

In New Haven, Democratic nominee Justin Elicker won a lopsided victory over incumbent Mayor Toni Harp, who had continued her reelection effort after losing the primary in September.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The city of New Haven has a new mayor. Justin Elicker was sworn in Wednesday, Jan 1.

In his inaugural address, Elicker said the city is growing at a rate not seen since the 1920s.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The head of a statewide association of nonprofits is calling on Connecticut officials to increase payments to the organizations.

Gian-Carl Casa said right now nonprofits of all types are facing what he describes as “a perfect storm.”

Courtesy Jennifer Tavares

Frank Tavares -- known as “the voice of NPR” -- has died. For decades, his was the friendly but authoritative voice that told public radio listeners that “funding for NPR comes from Lumber Liquidators,” or “the Pajamagram Company.”

K-State Research and Extension / Flickr Creative Commons

Millennials now outnumber baby boomers in the population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. And though the millennial generation has been stereotypically seen as self-absorbed and buried in student loan debt, they are involved in charitable giving. But they’re doing it differently than their parents have done.

Courtesy of Access Health CT

A federal appeals court in New Orleans dealt another blow to the Affordable Care Act last week, saying the requirement under the law to have health insurance is unconstitutional. But the court sidestepped the question of whether the health law itself is invalid.

Courtesy: Thompson Family

State officials and immigration attorneys in Connecticut are welcoming a ruling last week by the federal Board of Immigration Appeals that clarifies its position on the state’s pardon power. The BIA says it will now honor Connecticut’s pardons. That means Hartford resident Wayzaro Walton will be able to regain her legal status and avoid deportation from the U.S. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The federal Board of Immigration Appeals has indicated it will now recognize pardons issued by the state of Connecticut, according to the attorney for a Hartford woman previously threatened with deportation. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Plenty of school districts were closed or delayed Tuesday morning, and the roads were treacherous as Connecticut began the clean up after round two of a one-two wintry punch. The state saw a huge range of overnight snow totals, ranging from a foot of new snow in some towns to just a few inches in others. The storm is expected to move out, leaving afternoon sunshine.

kaboompics.com

Yale University is among the recipients of new grants from the Knight Foundation to fund research into the impact of technology on democracy. 

The House Intelligence Committee appears ready to compile its report on the impeachment inquiry after two weeks of public testimony. That’s despite the fact that several key witnesses who were subpoenaed to appear have declined to give evidence. Joining us to look back at the drama of the sessions to date, and to look forward to what’s to come is Rep. Jim Himes from Connecticut’s 4th District, who’s had the opportunity to question all of the witnesses so far.

Ryan Martins / Connecticut Public Radio

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in a case that could be pivotal for hundreds of thousands of young people covered by the DACA program, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. 

Courtesy: Cristian Padilla Romero

The United States Supreme Court heard arguments Tuesday in a challenge to the Trump administration’s decision to end Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, a program that shields young immigrants from deportation and allows them to work legally in the U.S. 

Courtesy: Cristian Padilla Romero

The mother of a Yale University doctoral student is being sent back to a detention facility in Georgia after nearly being deported Sunday night by Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Mr.TinDC / Creative Commons

AAA Northeast is warning drivers to watch out for deer.  

November is a particularly bad time for deer strikes because fall is mating season for white-tailed deer in New England. Also, with the end of daylight saving time, it’s often dark during the evening commute. 

Declan McEnroe / Connecticut Public Radio

Tens of thousands of homes in Connecticut lost power Thursday night as severe thunderstorms swept the eastern seaboard. Downed trees and power lines closed roads in cities and towns across the state, and dozens of school districts have delayed starts or canceled classes Friday.

Jeremiah Clapp and Calvin Leon Smith in a scene from On The Grounds Of Belonging, currently playing at the Long Wharf Theatre
Courtesy: Long Wharf Theatre

A big change is underway right now in American theater. More women and people of color are being appointed to lead theatrical institutions.

A recent survey called American Theater Leadership Change finds that of 85 artistic director positions that have opened since 2015, 41% have gone to women. People of color have been named to 26%. 

Wikimedia Commons

The Connecticut Supreme Court will hear arguments Thursday on whether one of two men convicted in a notorious 2007 home invasion and brutal triple-homicide in Cheshire should get a new trial. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state of Connecticut is suing the Department of Homeland Security and other federal agencies over a refusal to honor the state’s pardon system when it comes to immigration. 

Courtesy: Live Well

About 75,000 people in Connecticut live with dementia. And in a stage production in Hartford, five of them are telling their stories. To Whom I May Concern is a readers-theater style performance – and part of an effort to invite those living with cognitive change to educate others about what they’re experiencing. 

Courtesy: Seaview Productions

When it ran off-Broadway, the show Slave Play left audiences stunned. The provocative new script centers on three interracial couples – diving deeply into issues of racism, sexuality and love. Slave Play is now in previews and opening on Broadway in October.

Kevin Kuhl, CT Public

One of the most recognizable sounds of country music comes from an instrument that’s often overlooked: the pedal steel guitar. And one of the nation’s top pedal steel players lives - no, not in Nashville - but in Connecticut.

John Widgren has performed with recording artists including Jonathan Coulton, Patty Loveless, Martina McBride, Toby Keith and others. He’s played on Broadway, done hundreds of commercials and been a guest instrumentalist with the Boston Pops Orchestra.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal appeals court in New York City heard arguments Tuesday centering, in large part, on whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement has the right to deport an immigrant for past crimes, even though she’s been granted a full and unconditional pardon by the state of Connecticut. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal appeals court in New York City will hear arguments today on whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement has the right to deport an immigrant for past crimes, even though her record has been cleared by the state of Connecticut.

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong is expected to defend the legitimacy of the state’s pardons.

Cimafunk.
La Pistola de Moník

Despite ongoing tensions between the U.S. and Cuba, the music of Cimafunk reaches out and connects the sounds of Africa and Cuba with the rhythms of black America. Cimafunk performs Thursday in Hartford.

Leamond Suggs has seen pedestrians and drivers looking up at the banners. "People are moved by it," he said.
Lauren Smith / Connecticut Public Radio

Walk or drive around downtown New Haven and you can’t miss them: large-scale banners on the sides of buildings, in windows and on vacant storefronts featuring compelling photos of city youth.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal appeals court in Boston heard arguments Tuesday centering on whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement can deport immigrants even though they’ve been granted a state pardon for past crimes. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal court in Boston hears arguments Tuesday that will center, in part, on whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement has the right to deport immigrants for past crimes - despite a state pardon.

Lauren Smith/CT Public Radio

The man accused of a hate crime against a Connecticut church may have been in great theological distress – according to the church’s pastor.

Rev. Kristina Hansen is senior pastor at Mary Taylor Memorial United Methodist Church in downtown Milford, which has been openly defying the regulations of its governing body with its public affirmation of the LGBTQ community.

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