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Dismaying immigrants and advocates, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service (USCIS) sent out letters saying the agency will no longer consider most deferrals of deportation for people with serious medical conditions, documents show. 

Gerard Donnelly / Flickr

Enfield’s police chief said it appears that his officers who pursued a suspect across state lines into Massachusetts were following department protocol.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement / Flickr

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong is fighting recent immigration policy put forth by the Trump Administration.

Last week, Tong joined 17 other attorneys general in opposing the implementation of expedited removal. 

Can The U.S. Offshore Wind Industry Survive Without A Federal Tax Credit?

Aug 26, 2019
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The Trump administration’s decision to delay the Vineyard Wind project will impact the offshore wind developer’s ability to take advantage of a big federal tax credit that expires in December.

Democratic lawmakers say the administration’s decision was a political move to stall the project and could endanger the future growth of the industry. Lawmakers are scrambling to pass legislation to get the tax credit extended.

But some industry observers say offshore wind may be able to survive just fine without it. 

Matthew Lotz / U.S. Air Force

Researchers at UMass Amherst say it's unclear whether requiring vaccines in schools directly increases the number of children who get them.

Courtesy: Planned Parenthood of Southern New England

Planned Parenthood of Southern New England has blasted a Trump administration rule which denies funding to healthcare providers who refer patients for abortions.

The funding comes from the federal Title X program, which provides family planning services such as contraceptives, testing for sexually transmitted infections and breast cancer screenings to low income residents. 

Murphy Gives Gun Background Check Bill "Less Than 50-50" Odds

Aug 25, 2019
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Sen. Chris Murphy on Friday said any attempt by Congress to approve a bill expanding FBI background checks of gun purchasers has a “less than 50-50” chance of success.

During a press conference in Hartford, Murphy said he spoke with White House legislative staff several times, most recently on Thursday evening, about support for new gun laws in the wake of mass shootings earlier this month in El Paso, Texas and Dayton, Ohio.

Murphy said President Donald Trump has wavered since he telephoned the Democratic senator to talk about new gun legislation.

Province of British Columbia Follow / FLICKR

George Takei has lived long and prospered as an American actor, activist, and author. Although he’s best known for playing Lieutenant Hikaru Sulu on the original Star Trek television series, Takei has spent much of the last 20 years retelling his time spent living in U.S.-run internment camps during World War II.

woodleywonderworks / Creative Commons

For the past decade, Connecticut’s residential electric customers have paid bills that are among the highest in the continental United States, but there isn’t one grand explanation for Connecticut’s sky-high electric bills.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Executives and labor leaders at a group of skilled nursing homes in Connecticut that are set to lose Medicaid funding plan to challenge the state’s decision — they said otherwise, their nursing homes face severe financial cuts. 

Library of Congress

The Connecticut State Library has been awarded a grant of over $263,000 from the National Digital Newspaper Program, a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Library of Congress. The grant will be used to digitize Connecticut newspapers, and make them available online.

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

New Haven police Capt. Anthony Duff, who was hit multiple times while responding to a shooting incident last week, was discharged from hospital Thursday morning. 

Jonathan Levinson / OPB

On an unseasonably warm July day, Lionel Irving gets up from the sofa on his front porch to hug his 16-year-old niece Jaliyah who is just getting home from a summer program called Self Enhancement, Inc.

Kathleen Megan / CT Mirror

Miguel Cardona, the state’s new education chief, charged the state’s superintendents to challenge “the normalization of failure” to ensure that all students have a chance to succeed. 

Cimafunk.
La Pistola de Moník

Despite ongoing tensions between the U.S. and Cuba, the music of Cimafunk reaches out and connects the sounds of Africa and Cuba with the rhythms of black America. Cimafunk performs Thursday in Hartford.

Sneeze weed.
Virginia State Parks (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Some plants have unfortunate common names. Take sneezeweed for example. Sneezeweed, or helenium, is a native perennial that's blooming now with colorful flowers on 3 to 5 foot tall plants. It's great to grow in your garden because it flowers as the summer perennials, such as bee balm, are finishing but before the fall perennials, such as sedum and asters, begin.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s Attorney General said Wednesday he’s joining New York and Vermont in bringing a lawsuit against the Trump administration over immigrants’ access to public benefits because the government’s actions are damaging to this state’s economy and communities. 

TOM HINES

Ocean Vuong grew up in a Hartford that many of us don’t pay attention to. His family emigrated from Vietnam when he was two years old, and he came to know the area through the nail salons and tobacco fields where he and his mother worked. All the while, they struggled to create joy for themselves in the context of xenophobia, racism, and trauma from an American-led war that still weaves itself into our ways of knowing and living. 

His first novel, On Earth We’re Briefly Gorgeous, documents an American story that’s often erased — that of immigrant, war-torn, non-white, working-class life. 

Center for Security Policy

A group representing local Muslim Americans wants to know more about the owner of a minor league baseball team’s ties to an outfit that’s been called an “anti-Muslim hate group."

Nicholas King/SmokeTastic / Creative Commons

State officials are investigating two cases of severe respiratory symptoms that health experts say may be related to vaping or e-cigarette use.

The Department of Public Health said in a statement Wednesday that two Connecticut residents have been hospitalized with respiratory issues including shortness of breath, fever, cough, vomiting and diarrhea.

Officials say both patients admitted to vaping and e-cigarette use with both nicotine and marijuana products.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Lawmakers and members of the public listened at a forum in Hartford on Tuesday, as more details emerged regarding alleged mismanagement inside a quasi-public state agency. The Connecticut General Assembly’s Transportation Committee hosted the public hearing in order to learn more about the corporate structure of the Connecticut Port Authority.

Over Fishing, Lamont Gets To Know Cuomo

Aug 20, 2019
Courtesy: Office of Gov. Ned Lamont

Gov. Ned Lamont interrupted a two-week vacation at his summer home in Maine on Tuesday to fly to Lockport, N.Y., for a morning of sport fishing and policy talks on Lake Ontario with Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

At 8:30 a.m. on a Friday morning in Torrington, a group of counselors in lime green shirts gathered around the flag pole at Camp MOE for a quick game of WAH.

It was the last day of camp for the season — they were waiting for director Katherine Marchand-Beyer to make the morning announcements before children arrive. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

A group of teens from the Greater Hartford area spent their summer talking about and brainstorming solutions to gun violence within their communities. The Summer Youth Leadership Academy presented their solutions this week to city officials, community members and law enforcement under four umbrellas: accountability, preventing violence between youth, rehabilitation, and changing our violent culture.

Pexels

Catholics in Connecticut are reacting to the news that Diocese in four New England states launched a confidential online reporting system for abuse last week. One of the Connecticut Diocese launched a similar system back in March. 

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

After three years, the city of New Haven and the police union have finally reached a contract agreement.

Police union members on Friday overwhelmingly approved the contract by a vote of 259 to 13, after ongoing negotiations, and then a binding arbitration process. New Haven Mayor Toni Harp said part of the goal is to retain recruits and attract new police officers to the city. 

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

In recent years, an invasive insect called the gypsy moth has spelled doom for countless New England trees. From 2016 through 2018, it’s estimated gypsy moths defoliated more than 2 million acres in southern New England, which means a lot of cleanup for foresters.

But among all that destruction there is some good news: gypsy moth populations are, finally, declining.  

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Senator Richard Blumenthal is warning consumers about a proposal from the federal government that could force them to pay more for potentially inadequate repairs if they're involved in a car accident.

New Report Shows Recreational Marijuana Revenue Volatile In Many States

Aug 19, 2019
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

While Connecticut opted not to legalize and tax recreational marijuana sales this year, many lawmakers saw the pot market as a cash cow that could rake in tens of millions of dollars annually for the state’s coffers.

But a new analysis by Pew Charitable Trusts found that states with legalized pot sales are struggling to predict how much they can haul in on an annual basis. 

Luke Franzen/iStock / Thinkstock

The ACLU of Connecticut is bringing a case against the city of Stamford that it hopes will test bail practices around the state. 

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