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Joe Amon/Connecticut Public

Connecticut residents continue to adjust to living under a public health emergency, as state officials implemented more measures Friday aimed at curtailing the spread of COVID-19

The number of confirmed positive cases in Connecticut is now 12, with an additional 7 Connecticut residents testing positive in the last 24 hours.

avery soda coronavirus
Olivia Hickey / Connecticut Public Radio

Avery’s soda factory in New Britain is known for creating special limited edition sodas based on national events. They’ve poked fun at everything from presidential elections to the government shutdown -- and now the coronavirus. 

Sam Cox / Creative Commons

State regulators have announced that utilities will no longer be able to shut off the water, electricity or natural gas of residential customers if they don’t pay their bills. The order came during a week when Gov. Ned Lamont declared a public health emergency in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic.

Chelsea Daniels, a licensed practical nurse at Fresh River Healthcare in East Windsor and member of health care union SEIU 1199, says she's concerned about how nursing homes will prevention coronavirus infection. Thurs., March 12, 2020.
Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Adalis Martinez isn’t eating out as much these days. She also doesn’t spend too much time in stores. And she’s washing her hands — a lot.

“When I go to the store and come out, I’m washing my hands even in my car, so that I don’t touch anything,” she said. “It’s very concerning.” 

Richard Drew / Associated Press

The dizzying plunge in stock market values in recent days, as the coronavirus crisis has intensified, has the business world on edge. William Goetzmann, professor of finance at the Yale School of Management and stock market historian, spoke with Connecticut Public Radio’s All Things Considered to put the recent volatility into perspective.

Connecticut Has Run Only 90 COVID-19 Tests. That's A Problem

Mar 12, 2020
Jacqueline Rabe Thomas / CT Mirror

Connecticut is geographically caught between two hotspots of the coronavirus pandemic but has systematically turned away people for testing over the last, crucial few weeks because — until recently — it was only running 20 tests a day.

The state’s limited testing could hamper its ability to slow the spread of COVID-19 in the general population, experts say.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

Gov. Ned Lamont signed an executive order Thursday prohibiting all gatherings in Connecticut with more than 250 people. The measure is one of several announced that could radically alter day-to-day life and business in Connecticut, as the state responds to growing numbers of people testing positive for COVID-19 in Connecticut and New York.

Witch Hazel
sharin (Flickr) / Creative Commons

This time of year we're all starved for color. Maybe a few snowdrops, crocus and hellebores are blooming, but we need more! One shrub to the rescue is an unusual one because it blooms either now or late fall, depending on the species, with colorful, spider-like blossoms. It's the witch hazel.

 The Yale campus is quiet on March 11, 2020, as the school is on spring break. The university plans to shift classes online after the break ends to curb the spread of COVID-19.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

As college campuses across the country grapple with potential outbreaks of the coronavirus, Yale University has told students to not come back after spring break -- but that decision was made after spring break started, leaving many students in limbo.

Pomperaug High School senior swimmer Ethan Waskiel, 17, tries to get someone to open the front door as hundreds of high school student-athletes, parents and coaches protest the cancellation of winter sports.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Student-athletes and their coaches are upset with Connecticut’s high school sports association for its decision to cut the winter sports season short due to the spread of COVID-19. In Cheshire Wednesday, some of them protested outside the offices of the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference. 

Senior Maddi Larkin held up a sign that read, “Corona is not a reason to cancel the tournament.”

Her Sheehan High School team from Wallingford was about to play in the quarterfinals of the CIAC Class MM girls basketball tournament.

Gov. Ned Lamont declared civil preparedness and public health emergencies as Connecticut braces for the spread of the coronavirus.
Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

A third person in Connecticut has tested positive for coronavirus. Health officials said Wednesday the patient is a man over the age of 65 who lives at a private residence in New Canaan. He is hospitalized at Norwalk Hospital.

This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reveals ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
NIAID-RML

There’s a lot that the medical community is still learning about coronavirus, but one thing seems clear: Older adults, especially those with chronic health conditions, are at higher risk for infection.

We spoke with Dr. Manisha Juthani, an associate professor at the Yale School of Medicine, to learn more. She’s an expert on infectious diseases in older people.

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the 2020 McIntyre-Shaheen 100 Club dinner.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

It was another big night for Joe Biden. The former vice president won a set of resounding victories over Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders Tuesday, most notably in Michigan, which Sanders won four years ago.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Hartford HealthCare has set up a COVID-19 command center in Newington for workers to answer questions from Connecticut residents who want to know more about the disease.

David Butler II / CPTV Sports

The fallout from the spread of the coronavirus has hit high school sports in the state. The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference has notified schools that it has canceled the state championships for all winter sports. 

Gov. Ned Lamont declared civil preparedness and public health emergencies as Connecticut braces for the spread of the coronavirus.
Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont has declared civil preparedness and public health emergencies as Connecticut braces for the spread of the coronavirus.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio

139 wins, 0 losses.

That’s the mark -- including seven postseason titles -- the University of Connecticut women’s basketball team finishes with as members of the American Athletic Conference.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Advocates for undocumented immigrants want federal law enforcement to stay out of state courthouses. Members of the Connecticut Immigrant Rights Alliance and several others protested Monday on the steps of the state Supreme Court. 

Paul Wade / NOAA Fisheries

Connecticut lawmakers are considering a bill that would ban the sale and breeding of certain whales held in captivity. 

ned lamont
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Officials said Monday the state is working with hospitals, school districts and employers to try to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. The news conference came just hours before Connecticut reported its second presumptive positive test for the virus in a state resident.

The second case involves a patient from the Bridgeport area.

Coronavirus Crisis Fuels DeLauro’s Effort For Paid Sick Leave

Mar 9, 2020
Harriet Jones / WNPR

The coronavirus crisis has bolstered U.S. Rep. Rosa DeLauro’s effort to secure paid sick leave for all Americans, including low-wage workers who can’t afford to stay home when they are sick.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Jim Calhoun’s University of Saint Joseph men’s basketball team played its first NCAA Division III Tournament game Friday, 16 months after the Blue Jays had their first game.

This illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), reveals ultrastructural morphology exhibited by coronaviruses.
NIAID-RML

A Wilton man has become Connecticut’s first presumptive positive coronavirus case, state officials announced Sunday afternoon.

Gov. Ned Lamont said in a news release that the patient is between 40 and 50 years old and is being treated at Danbury Hospital. Officials said this person likely became infected with the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 illness during a recent trip to California. 

The Office Of Gov. Ned Lamont

A community physician who works at Bridgeport Hospital is the second hospital employee in Connecticut to be infected with coronavirus, which causes the COVID-19 illness.

Hospital officials told reporters Saturday afternoon that the man is a New York resident and lives in Westchester County. The state was notified of the positive case by the New York State Department of Health. 

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio

State officials in Hartford Friday said they want to expand coronavirus testing “dramatically” in the next couple days and weeks.  

Gov. Ned Lamont said this will cover more people who need to be tested or treated quickly. 

John F. Rodis president of Saint Francis Hospital opens a press conference for Governor Ned Lamont to speak on the states preparedness for the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) on March 06, 2020 in Hartford.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

This post is no longer being updated.

Events are being canceled and schools are turning to remote learning as Connecticut residents and officials attempt to check the spread of coronavirus in the state.

Connecticut lawmakers will begin the daunting task Friday of crafting a strategy to mobilize the public and private sectors to combat the coronavirus – an effort that comes as state health officials acknowledged hundreds of residents are being monitored for the illness.

PxHere

A study centered on veterans with “other-than-honorable” discharges reveals that they are routinely denied health care benefits – even if they’re potentially eligible.

Many military veterans need help with medical issues after their service career ends. For that treatment, they can go to a medical center operated by the Department of Veterans Affairs, or VA. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Despite long odds in a session that lasts only three months, lawmakers on Thursday rolled out the newest version of their “public option” bill, saying they were not discouraged by the limited timeframe and lack of support from key Republicans and the governor.

The latest iteration of the proposal to expand government-subsidized health insurance would allow businesses with 50 or fewer employees, nonprofits of any size and labor unions to join the state-operated Connecticut Partnership plan, which already is available to municipalities.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Lee “Mixashawn” Rozie is a multi-instrumentalist who fuses jazz with the music of many cultures, especially Indigenous people. His latest work, An American Songbook, gets its world premiere Saturday in West Hartford.

The title may be misleading to some. Rather than a celebration of popular music from the first half of the 20th century, Rozie’s interpretation of the phrase is quite literal.

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