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Jessica Hill / Associated Press

The head of Newman's Own Foundation has been ousted from his position after allegations of misconduct from employees, though the nature of the misconduct has not been officially released.

Bob Forrester was Paul Newman's right-hand man, and he took over the Westport-based foundation when Newman died in 2008. 

Lauren Smith / Connecticut Public Radio

If you’ve been inspired by recent Fourth of July celebrations, you don’t have to travel outside of Connecticut to encounter some of the original history of Independence Day.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As oral arguments were being heard Tuesday by the U.S. Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in Louisiana in a multi-state lawsuit that seeks to invalidate the Affordable Care Act, Connecticut senators at the Capitol in Washington, D.C., were making the case as to why Americans need the federal health care law.

Sen. Chris Murphy said eliminating the ACA without any replacement plan in place would result in a “humanitarian catastrophe.”

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A series of events in and around Hartford this Saturday night is expected to create major traffic headaches. But the Department of Transportation is reminding eventgoers that there are options out there besides getting in your car and contributing to the gridlock.

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

A federal appeals court Tuesday ruled in favor of Tweed New Haven airport following a lengthy lawsuit seeking to extend the runway and attract additional service to the area.

Mark Ojakian
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

There's currently a $12 million hole in the state's community college budget for next year, and the gap is expected to widen in the coming years if changes don't happen soon.

The Board of Regents for Higher Education approved the use of $8 million from its reserve funds to cover some of the shortfall, but that money won't last forever.

Menopause's Long Learning Curve

Jul 9, 2019
Melanie Stengel / C-HIT

Every day an estimated 6,000 women in the U.S. reach menopause, a natural part of aging. But for countless women, it feels like anything but. The symptoms, which range from merely bothersome to debilitating, are triggered by the body’s loss of estrogen, which occurs at a median age of 50 to 52 among women in industrialized countries. 

Jade Allen / Connecticut Public Radio

The Department of Defense has announced it will delay the implementation of restrictions on veterans that would prohibit them from transferring benefits to their loved ones and dependents. The restrictions had been set to go into effect this Friday, July 12. Currently many troops can allow their children to ease the cost of higher education through transferring their post-9/11 GI Bill benefits -- but the new rules would remove that right.

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

Governor Ned Lamont told reporters Monday he's finding out more about the environmental and health risks associated with the family of chemicals known as PFAS.

Lauren Smith/CT Public Radio

The man accused of a hate crime against a Connecticut church may have been in great theological distress – according to the church’s pastor.

Rev. Kristina Hansen is senior pastor at Mary Taylor Memorial United Methodist Church in downtown Milford, which has been openly defying the regulations of its governing body with its public affirmation of the LGBTQ community.

Yalines Herrera, 15, participated in the Summer Youth Employment Program last year, and is again participating this year.
David DesRoches / Connecticut Public Radio

Nearly 200 Hartford students will be spending the rest of their summer working, thanks to a paid internship program funded by the state and several nonprofits.

Yalines Herrera, 15, participated in the Summer Youth Employment Program last year. She said if she wasn't getting a job this summer, she’d probably spend her summer at home.

The Hartford Police Department will roll out 325 body cameras to its officers by the end of 2019.
Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

As public interest in fatal police use of force continues, a growing number of police departments have begun using body-worn cameras as tools for transparency and documentation of civilian interactions.

A recent study found that about a third of older adults don't store their firearms in the safest way -- locked up and unloaded.
Pixabay

Daryl Howard turns 65 in October. He has a Glock .45-caliber handgun stored in his desk at home, but hopes never to use it.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Since a drowning accident took the life of their 21-month-old son in 1989, Stew and Kim Leonard have worked to raise awareness about the importance of water safety — bringing their message to a West Hartford pool Friday morning.

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library

Newly discovered papers from an 18th century Yale alumnus offer a fresh look at campus life during the Revolutionary War.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Kristen Whitney Daniels was 15 years old when she was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes — a lifelong disease.

“As if I wasn’t awkward enough as a sophomore in high school, I also acquired this chronic illness that completely upended my life,” she said.

United States goalkeeper Alyssa Naeher saves a penalty shot taken by England's Steph Houghton during the Women's World Cup semifinal soccer match between England and the United States, at the Stade de Lyon, outside Lyon, France, Tuesday, July 2, 2019.
Alessandra Tarantino / Associated Press

The United States was up 2-1 against England in the semifinals of the Women’s World Cup on Tuesday. In the 84th minute, all eyes were on England’s Steph Houghton who could tie the match with a penalty kick. The only person stopping her was U.S. goalkeeper -- and Stratford, Connecticut native -- Alyssa Naeher.

Malabar spinach
Artizone (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Gardeners love the idea of being independent of the seasons to grow crops whenever we like. For example, I love greens and would love to grow spinach, arugula and lettuce all summer, but I know the heat will cause them to bolt and get bitter. However, there are greens that can tolerate the heat and shine all summer.

They Love Public Financing. The Oversight, Not As Much.

Jul 3, 2019
Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

Tense for years, the General Assembly’s relationship with the State Elections Enforcement Commission is now so toxic that clean-election advocates speak wistfully about staging an intervention, finding some way to break a cycle of recrimination they say undermines campaign-finance reforms Connecticut adopted in 2005 to national acclaim. 

Ollie was hit with an effective three-year coaching ban. UConn's team will also be placed on probation for two years as a result of the violations.
Steve Slade / University of Connecticut

The former head coach of UConn men’s basketball has been penalized by the NCAA for violating coaching rules and failing to properly cooperate with investigators.

The NCAA announced its penalty against Kevin Ollie on Tuesday. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

A state jury has ruled in favor of the city of Hartford and against a developer in the controversial case of the bungled construction of the city's recently-built minor league baseball park. 

In a decision announced Tuesday, the jury found against developer Centerplan in a suit brought after the city fired the developer from the job.

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

Residents and state officials met in Windsor on Tuesday, following a chemical spill last month that sent thousands of gallons of contaminated water into the Farmington River.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

The Quinnipiac River was, historically, one of Connecticut’s most polluted. For decades, nineteenth-century factories and densely populated towns poured sewage and industrial waste into the river. 

But recent history has been kinder to the Quinnipiac – thanks to a combination of conservation and environmental laws, which helped to boost its water quality and pave the way for the return of fish and wildlife.

Sam Doran / SHNS

In addition to failing to suspend the license of a driver who allegedly killed seven motorcyclists in a crash last month, the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles also ignored written out-of-state violation reports for at least 16 months, leaving tens of thousands of warnings about Massachusetts drivers to build up in a Quincy storage room, officials said Monday. 

New Haven Mayor Toni Harp and Community Services Administrator Dakibu Muley at a city hall press conference announcing lead mitigation plan.
Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

New Haven is about to get tougher on its lead poisoning standards. The mayor outlined a plan Monday following multiple lawsuits against the city for not enforcing existing lead laws.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

It’s been more than three years since the city of Hartford fired Centerplan Construction, the original developer of the Dunkin’ Donuts Park baseball stadium. The firing prompted Centerplan to sue the city, saying it was wrongfully terminated. Jurors heard closing arguments in the case Monday. 

Steve Hamm / C-HIT

Joseph Deane had been drug free for months before he overdosed in the bathroom of a restaurant in New Haven last December. He couldn’t resist when his dealer offered drugs. Unfortunately, the dope turned out to be fentanyl. 

Hartford's Exorbitant Commercial Property Tax Curbs Economic Growth

Jun 30, 2019
Greg Bordonaro / Hartford Business Journal

When D&D Market closed its Franklin Avenue storefront in Sept. 2016, Hartford lost more than a landmark small business.

The third-generation family grocer, caterer and purveyor of fresh foods traces its Capital City roots back to 1932, when present-day owner Daniel D’Aprile’s grandfather opened a bustling market that became a mainstay on one of Hartford’s most vibrant small-business corridors.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Police are investigating two Friday night shootings — one in Hamden and one in New Haven — and investigators believe the incidents are connected. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Fifty years ago in the summer of 1969, during an era of extreme homophobia, police in New York City carried out a violent raid at the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar. In the immediate days after, members of the gay community held protests and demonstrations in the city.

The riots gained momentum and eventually led to the modern day LGBTQ civil rights movement.

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