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Carlos Giusti / Associated Press

The island of Puerto Rico remains in a state of emergency as it recovers from a string of earthquakes that have rattled the island in recent days. A magnitude 6.4 earthquake centered near Puerto Rico’s southern coast caused major damage in the early hours of Tuesday morning. 

Senate Democrats Near 'Contingent Consensus' On Truck Tolls

Jan 7, 2020
Washington State Dept. of Transportation/flickr creative commons

The Democratic majorities of the state House and Senate cautiously edged toward consensus Tuesday on a 10-year, $19 billion transportation infrastructure plan that would charge tolls for tractor trailers on a dozen Connecticut highway bridges.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

New Haven Mayor Justin Elicker released his transition team’s report Tuesday outlining the city’s goals.

The report includes 10 areas of concentration ranging from education, public safety and climate change to housing, immigration and arts and culture. 

Connecticut State Police officers lead Fotis Dulos, center, from the State Police barracks to a waiting car Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2020, in Bridgeport, Conn., after he was arrested at his home in Farmington. He faces charges he murdered his estranged wife Jenni
Chris Ehrmann / Associated Press

Fotis Dulos, the estranged husband of Jennifer Farber Dulos, who has been missing for months, has been charged with her murder.

The New Canaan woman went missing after dropping her children at school in May of 2019. Her body has never been found.

SLAWOMIR FAJER / ISTOCK / THINKSTOCK

Even when patients go to a hospital within their insurance coverage network, they still risk being seen by individual physicians who don’t take their insurance. Later, patients may get billed for the amount their insurance company doesn’t cover for out-of-network services.

new study by researchers at Yale University found that some of these out-of-network charges can be significant among certain specialties.

Paul Bass / New Haven Independent

Connecticut continues to react to escalating tensions between the United States and Iran sparked by the killing of a senior Iranian general by American forces.

Sujata Srinivasan

Predicting the direction of the economy is a notoriously tricky business, and it may be even more difficult than usual as we look further into 2020. That’s because the year ahead is full of political and financial uncertainty -- both for Connecticut and for the nation. Connecticut Public gathered thoughts and predictions from some of the state’s foremost economic thinkers.

Jarrod Carruthers / Creative Commons

A major U.S. insurer headquartered in Connecticut said it will cut ties with certain fossil fuel companies. The Hartford said in December that it will no longer invest in or provide insurance coverage to companies that generate more than a quarter of their revenues from coal mining or the extraction of oil from tar sands.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Tax season is upon us, and for low- and moderate-income filers, free help is at hand. 

VITA sites will spring up beginning this week at libraries, community centers and schools around the state. VITA stands for Volunteer Income Tax Assistance, and it’s just what it sounds like: volunteer preparers, trained by the IRS, who will do your taxes on the spot -- for free.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

A lawsuit by families of victims of the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School has the potential to significantly change what the world knows about how the gun industry thinks and operates. After years of delays, the lawsuit is moving forward, which may force the gun industry to make public what it considers private.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A multi-state coalition of Democratic state attorney’s general and a governor are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in on a recent court decision on the Affordable Care Act’s individual mandate in an effort to preserve the federal health care law. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut’s two U.S. senators believe that the release of a previously redacted email strengthens the impeachment case against Donald Trump.

Connecticut’s two Democratic U.S. senators condemned the killing of Iranian Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani in a U.S. drone strike at Baghdad Airport Thursday night.

Sens. Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy believe the strike may lead to reprisals from Iran.

Murphy called the operation  an “act of war” and said he thinks the military leader will now be seen as a martyr.

As we enter a new year, what new vegetable varieties should you try growing?
julie (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Happy New Year. I'm looking forward to another outstanding gardening year. To kick it off, I make lists of new vegetable varieties to try. Here are a few that caught my eye!

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A recent stabbing at a Hanukkah gathering in New York has local leaders in the Jewish community worrying about acts of anti-Semitism taking place in Connecticut.

RYAN CARON KING / CT Public Radio

Connecticut expects to receive around $6 million in additional federal funding to help fight the opioid crisis. U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal announced Thursday that the money will come from $1.5 billion recently approved by Congress to help states provide prevention and treatment efforts. 

A Hartford police lieutenant is going to court against the operator of a blog critical of Hartford politicians and members of the police department. The case raises issues of freedom of speech and responsibility for that speech.

In New Haven, Democratic nominee Justin Elicker won a lopsided victory over incumbent Mayor Toni Harp, who had continued her reelection effort after losing the primary in September.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

The city of New Haven has a new mayor. Justin Elicker was sworn in Wednesday, Jan 1.

In his inaugural address, Elicker said the city is growing at a rate not seen since the 1920s.

Desensitization Gives Some Children With Food Allergies A Viable Treatment Option

Jan 2, 2020
Carl Jordan Castro / C-HIT

For Oliver Racco, it’s a part of his daily routine: eating a few peanut M&Ms.

It may seem like a treat to some kids, but for Oliver -- and a relatively small but growing number of children -- it’s an important way he and his family manage his peanut allergy.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The head of a statewide association of nonprofits is calling on Connecticut officials to increase payments to the organizations.

Gian-Carl Casa said right now nonprofits of all types are facing what he describes as “a perfect storm.”

KUZMA/ISTOCK / THINKSTOCK

Connecticut’s Sentencing Commission will again be pushing for considerable changes to the state’s sex offender registry. 

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

Mario Aguilar Castanon, formerly threatened with deportation, has been granted asylum by the U.S. Immigration Court in Boston. After a delay during which it appeared he might be kept in detention pending an appeal by ICE, the teenager was released and returned home.

via WikiMedia Commons

More than two dozen new state laws go into effect on Jan. 1, ranging from expanded health insurance coverage and paid leave to changes in court, property and DMV rules.

Courtesy Jennifer Tavares

Frank Tavares -- known as “the voice of NPR” -- has died. For decades, his was the friendly but authoritative voice that told public radio listeners that “funding for NPR comes from Lumber Liquidators,” or “the Pajamagram Company.”

Courtesy of the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History

The Yale Peabody Museum’s Great Hall and the Mammal Hall close Tuesday, Dec. 31, for a three-year renovation. Some of the big dinosaur fossils in the hall have to be taken apart so they can fit through the doors of the museum on their way out. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Lawmakers and state leaders joined members of the Jewish community at a vigil in West Hartford Monday evening, in solidarity with the victims of a stabbing attack in New York.

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

Ten people were honored Monday in New Haven for their outstanding service to the community. Outgoing mayor Toni Harp presented each of them with a key to the city during a special ceremony at City Hall. 

Paddy Abramowicz

Federal officials have earmarked more than $250 million to address concerns related to PFAS chemical contamination. The money was set aside as part of a spending package approved by Congress earlier this month, but it’s unclear what impact the dollars will have locally.

At Amazon Warehouse In North Haven, Workers Do Their Jobs Side-By-Side With Robots

Dec 30, 2019
Ross D. Franklin / Associated Press

Guess who's getting used to working with robots in their everyday lives? The very same warehouse workers once predicted to be losing their jobs to mechanical replacements.

UConn School of Engineering

In homes in which a family member has autism, day-to-day tasks can be challenging. One family is now trying to solve some of those issues, by pairing up with engineering students from the University of Connecticut.

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