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Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Eversource has hardly been out of the news since the prolonged restoration of power in the wake of Tropical Storm Isaias. And the latest headline concerns a $700 million loan the utility says it would like the state to underwrite. 

Students get off a bus on the first day of school in Connecticut. The first few days will be about setting expectations for mask wearing and social distancing according to superindendents.
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

The first day of school always comes with transition. But as districts across the state open up classrooms and laptops this year, back to school will require a different kind of adjustment given the ongoing pandemic. Superintendents say they have a new set of expectations for the first few weeks of school. 

coronavirus testing
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Some COVID-19 patients recover from the virus relatively quickly, but others have to deal with lingering or even new symptoms months after battling the virus. Ellie Stevenson of Norwalk says she is what’s called a long hauler.

Patrick Skahill

State officials say a forest fire in Windham is getting under control, but it could continue to smolder over the coming weeks if statewide drought conditions worsen. 

Turns out, birds love to eat persimmons, too.
Rick Derevan (Flickr / Creative Commons)

Usually when I think of fall fruit trees, I think of apples and pears. They're great but there's another fruit tree that I've grown for a while now and it's a beauty.  

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Weeks of state investigations, monitoring and intervention at Three Rivers Nursing Home in Norwich following a COVID-19 outbreak has culminated in the imminent relocation of all residents.

In a rare and unprecedented move, the Department of Public Health's acting commissioner Deidre Gifford signed an emergency order Wednesday requiring the facility to discharge its 53 residents to other long-term care facilities. 

Jeff Amy / AP Photo

U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal wants answers after hearing a report of forced sterilizations carried out on migrant detainees at an ICE detention facility.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio


Back in August, families with children in Hartford Public Schools responded to an online survey aimed at finding out the reasons behind their decision to send their kids back to school.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Traditional high school football won’t be played in Connecticut this fall. The Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference -- the governing body of state high school sports -- said the final decision follows a Department of Public Health recommendation to abandon full-contact, 11-on-11 football during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Here’s the story that New England tells itself: Racism is a Southern problem.

But our region’s abolitionist past hides a darker history of racism, slavery and segregation. It’s a legacy that lives with us today. 

CT Governor Ned Lamont
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

At a groundbreaking for a new development in Berlin Wednesday, Gov. Ned Lamont was greeted by protesters, making for some uncomfortable moments at the accompanying news conference.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public/NENC

From suburban Connecticut to rural Maine, demonstrators occupied highways and town greens over the summer with banners and calls for racial justice. 

By the first day of school, Waterbury Public Schools had yet to contact the entire parent population. 10% were still unresponsive to what the district classified as repeated attempts.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The start of school always means a flurry of communication between the district and parents. This year, that communication has become both more important, and infinitely more complicated, as coronavirus restrictions change all the usual procedures. In Waterbury, some parents and schools are struggling to get on the same page.

Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

This story has been updated.

Rev. Elvin Clayton has been the pastor at Walter’s Memorial African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in Bridgeport for the past six years.

And in the COVID-19 era, Sunday mornings look a little different -- Clayton speaks at the pulpit from behind glass partitions, keeps services to an hour and broadcasts it all live on Facebook. 

“We’ve had great success thus far with it,” he said. 

Some of the computers Bridgeport Public Schools received this summer to help students still learning at home.
LINDA CONNER LAMBECK / HEARST CT MEDIA

With most school districts in Connecticut requiring that students learn online at least part of the time, the Lamont administration announced Tuesday that 20,000 of the 81,000 students who need a laptop for classes will receive one in the next few weeks.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

To play or not to play full-contact high school football? That has been the question in Connecticut for weeks. The state Department of Public Health says no. Coaches like House Speaker Joe Aresimowicz (D) say yes. 

Signs at Bradley International Airport remind travelers to wear masks at all times and maintain proper social distancing on June 25.
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

Gov. Ned Lamont announced this week that folks who ignore Connecticut’s mask mandate will be subject to a $100 fine. Also, there are now fines for parties of more than 25 people indoors or more than 100 people outdoors. 

Wikimedia Commons

Bears are getting more and more used to raiding our trash cans and bird feeders for food. And as they get more comfortable with that behavior, they’re learning another one: coming into our houses. It’s not even fall yet, but state environmental officials said this week that Connecticut has already seen more incidents of bears entering homes in 2020 than in any previous year. 

Lamont Orders Fines For Those Who Flout COVID Rules

Sep 15, 2020
Gov. Ned Lamont
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Gov. Ned Lamont established a new series of fines Monday, ranging from $100 to $500, for those who refuse to wear protective masks in public or who organize or attend large, private events.

jwblinn/iStock / Thinkstock

After reviewing requests by Connecticut insurers to increase health insurance premiums, and considering public testimony, the state Insurance Department has approved next year’s rates at significantly lower levels than requested. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As in-person learning continues throughout Connecticut, at least eight schools have closed their doors temporarily or imposed restrictions after confirmed cases of COVID-19. 

Wikimedia Commons

State health officials say a potentially dangerous bacteria found in the water along Long Island Sound has caused an unusually high number of illnesses this summer. 

Efforts To Reduce COVID-19’s Spread Could Impact Health Outcomes For New Mothers And Infants

Sep 14, 2020
Felicia Tombascio and her daughter, Anastasia Marie Cordero.
handout photo / Connecticut Health I-Team

Felicia Tambascio’s first pregnancy was going fairly smoothly. But on July 20, at week 38, the 20-year-old Brookfield resident woke with horrible upper abdominal cramps, a searing headache, and vomiting. Her boyfriend took her to the hospital, but Tambascio was left to wait in a hallway alone. Per COVID-19 restrictions, no visitors were allowed unless the patient was admitted to labor and delivery. 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Attorney General William Tong announced Monday the state is taking on one of the world’s biggest oil companies, suing ExxonMobil for allegedly lying to consumers about climate change. At a news conference in New Haven, Tong contended the company has known for the past 70 years that its products were contributing to climate change.

Connecticut Weighs Options For Making Electric Vehicle Rebates More Equitable

Sep 14, 2020
Mariordo / Wikimedia Commons

The new board overseeing Connecticut’s electric vehicle rebate program is grappling with how best to restructure the program to incorporate used vehicles and attract more low- to moderate-income purchasers.

Prosecutor Looking Into The Origins Of The Russia Probe Resigns

Sep 11, 2020
Haraz N. Ghanbari / Associated Press

A federal prosecutor who was helping lead the investigation into the origins of the Trump-Russia probe has resigned from the Justice Department, a spokesman said Friday.

Nora Dannehy was a top prosecutor on a team led by U.S. Attorney John Durham of Connecticut, who was appointed last year to lead an investigation into how the FBI and other federal agencies set out to investigate Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and whether the Trump campaign had coordinated with the Kremlin.

CIAC Executive Director Glenn Lungarini is surrounded by students during an interview as hundreds of high school student-athletes, parents and coaches protested outside the offices of the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Though the state Department of Public Health has not reversed its decision that effectively banned high school football this fall, CIAC director Glenn Lungarini said he was pleased with how Friday’s three-hour discussion with officials went. 

A sticker on the back windshield of Republican State Sen. Eric Berthel's car is a reference to the QAnon conspiracy theory.
@yungnutmeg / Twitter

This story has been updated.

A Republican state senator in Connecticut is facing questions after a photo posted on social media showed his vehicle with a sticker that is a nod to the QAnon conspiracy theory movement.

Connecticut residents gather to at the 9-11 Memorial at Sherwood Island State Park
Ali Warshavsky / Connecticut Public

Kimberly Gardner clutched a picture of her husband Christopher Thursday evening.   He was 37 at the time of the attacks on the World Trade Center living in Darien. He died trying to help others get out of 2 World Trade where he worked. Gardner, at a memorial at Sherwood Island State Park, said her children were just two and three years old when her husband died. 

Brian A. Pounds / Hearst Connecticut Media

Federal authorities have arrested Bridgeport police chief Armando "AJ" Perez and city personnel director David Dunn on charges that reportedly amount to an accusation that the pair rigged Perez’s hiring two years ago. 

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