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Susan Haigh / Associated Press

A federal judge moved this week to dismiss a lawsuit challenging Rhode Island’s truck-only tolling arrangement. The state’s legislature decided in 2016 to institute tolls, but just for trucks and only at certain spots on Interstate 95. Singling out trucks is a position that gubernatorial candidate Ned Lamont also took while on the campaign trail -- only to reverse himself and back universal tolling after he was elected.

An ebullient Ella, with her sister Riley, outside the Old State House.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Ella Briggs, now 11, will never forget the day she got sent to the “naughty chair” in kindergarten for putting pants on her gingerbread person.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

People who describe themselves as "proponents for choice in vaccines" held a press conference Tuesday at the state capitol, on pending state legislation that would mandate certain vaccines. Part of the press conference was a presentation by vaccine skeptic Robert F. Kennedy Jr. who raised concerns about the safety of one particular vaccine, Gardasil. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Only a small number of states have aid-in-dying or death-with-dignity laws that allow terminally ill patients to end their lives, and Connecticut supporters want that option, too. But opponents argue it could be dangerous, especially for people with disabilities.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Proposals that would expand gaming in Connecticut are on their way to the floor of the state legislature.

Lawmakers passed several bills Tuesday, ranging from legislation that would skirt federal approval to authorize the building of a casino in East Windsor, to blueprints for how sports betting could be adopted in the state.

David DesRoches / WNPR

Seven police dogs were part of the 200th graduating class of canine teams to go through special training to detect electronic devices.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Renewable energy projects have been growing across New England in recent years. And while offshore wind and grid-scale solar have gotten lots of the attention -- a smaller, more community-oriented way of getting power has been steadily taking hold: “shared clean energy.”

Package Stores Offer Dime Recycling Fee In Lieu Of Liquor Bottle Deposits

Mar 18, 2019
Jeff Kubina (Flickr) / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s package stores have proposed a 10-cent “recycling fee” as a compromise alternative to the 25-cent deposit Gov. Ned Lamont recommended last month.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The city of Hartford is going back to a familiar strategy with the hope that local businesses can capitalize on March Madness.

Beginning March 21, the NCAA Tournament returns to Hartford for the first time since 1998.

David DesRoches

About 200 young people and their supporters gathered at the capitol in Hartford on Friday to demand action on climate change.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Faith communities around Connecticut came together to show support in the wake of the mass shootings at two mosques in New Zealand. 

Rep. Ezequiel Santiago Of Bridgeport Dies Of Heart Attack

Mar 15, 2019
Rep. Ezequiel Santiago
Connecticut House Democrats / Facebook

Rep. Ezequiel Santiago, D-Bridgeport, who began the 2019 session as the new co-chair of the Banks Committee after a decade in the General Assembly, died Friday morning after being stricken by an apparent heart attack, legislators said.

"An Gorta Mór" by Robert Ballagh (2012).
Ireland's Great Hunger Museum / Quinnipiac University

Museums that tell the stories of tragic world events can be sobering, thought-provoking – and often poignant and uplifting. Nestled in Hamden, Connecticut is an art museum that centers on a defining moment in Ireland’s history –  the great famine of the mid-19th century.

Pixabay / Creative Commons

Money appears to be no object for the 33 parents recently charged by federal authorities for paying bribes so that their kids could get in to elite schools like Georgetown, UCLA, and Yale.

David Wheeler, whose son Ben was killed at Sandy Hook, speaks at a press conference after the Connecticut Supreme Court ruling.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

After months of silence, the Connecticut Supreme Court reinstated a wrongful death lawsuit filed by the families of nine victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting against Remington Arms, the manufacturer of the rifle used in the shooting. 

Maja Dumat (Creative Commons) / Wikimedia

While green carnations are all the rage on St. Patrick’s Day, I would rather give a shamrock plant to a loved one. Oxalis, or the shamrock plant, can be an invasive weed in warm climates, a sour-tasting ground cover in cold climates or a cute houseplant. I want to focus on the houseplant versions.

Former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez leaving Hartford Superior Court on November 14, 2018, following arguments over his pension.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A state judge has revoked the public pension of former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez, a year and a half after Perez pleaded guilty to two corruption-related offenses stemming from his time in office.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut emergency departments will get free supplies of naloxone, the opioid antidote, to start distributing the reversal drug to patients as they leave the hospital.

Nathalie Taranto, 85, of Easton, said she's worried about how a proposed Connecticut asset test would affect her eligibility in the Medicare Savings Program.
Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut is considering reinstating an asset test for Medicare Savings Programs. State officials say it will save money while program enrollees are worried about losing coverage and experiencing higher health care costs.

Baishampayan Ghose / Flickr

The Connecticut Lottery wants to partner up with the state on sports betting.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Authorities in Boston announced charges Tuesday in an alleged large-scale college bribery scheme.

Prosecutors said dozens of people have been charged in what federal officials are calling the biggest college admissions scam ever prosecuted by the Justice Department. 

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

For almost two decades no federal dollars have been allocated to researching the effects of gun violence. But there are moves afoot to change that. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

In a public hearing for several gun bills that lasted for more than eight hours, the testimonies of concerned mothers, proud gun owners, weary police chiefs, and drained doctors were put forth for the Judiciary Committee's consideration. 

Ariana Cubillos / Associated Press

As the Trump administration tries to end Temporary Protected Status for countries such as El Salvador, Honduras and Haiti, thousands of immigrants fleeing the economic and political crisis in Venezuela are looking for humanitarian protections under TPS, so they won’t be deported. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

State lawmakers revealed details Thursday on how Connecticut could create and run its own public option health care plan, which would compete with private insurers.

David DesRoches / Connecticut Public Radio

Over 1,300 students, faculty members, and others have signed a petition asking for the state to stop its plan to consolidate the 12 public community colleges into one system. 

They’re calling themselves the Reluctant Warriors. 

School Regionalization Bills Sow Confusion, Spread Fear

Mar 11, 2019

Ever since Senate President Pro Tem Martin Looney’s controversial school regionalization bill referenced realigning districts “in a manner similar to the probate districts,” the brightly colored map delineating those court districts has been shared widely on social media by alarmed parents and educators.

Adam Hushin / Connecticut Public Radio

Local immigration advocates are continuing a push for state laws that would protect undocumented immigrants.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Many Americans are shocked by their 2018 tax refunds.

The Internal Revenue Service is reporting that the average refund is down 17 percent this year as compared to the same time in 2018.

Steven Millstein / Flickr

Saving money is not always an easy or fun thing to do on a consistent schedule. Bills can add up. Unforeseen expenses can take you by surprise. Luckily there are experts out there who can give you a hand when it comes to saving money and getting out of debt.

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