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AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma

Power outages are being reported across the state as Tropical Storm Isaias moves across Connecticut. Downed trees are blocking roads and bringing down power lines in many towns in winds as high as 70 miles per hour. Many counties are under a tornado warning until 9pm tonight. 

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases, testifies before a House Select Subcommittee hearing on the Coronavirus, Friday, July 31, 2020 on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Erin Scott / Pool via AP

Dr. Anthony Fauci says Connecticut is in a good place when it comes to the pandemic. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

With a presidential primary just a week away, municipal clerks are feeling the stress of absentee voting amid the pandemic. 

The San Marino Ristorante Italiano restaurant in Waterbury has brought back about half of its business, but La Bella Vista banquet hall, about 5 miles away, has struggled with indoor gathering capacity limits.
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

Tony D’Elia owns San Marino Ristorante Italiano and La Bella Vista in Waterbury. One’s a restaurant, one’s a banquet hall. And he's among the many restaurant owners pushing to increase the capacity of indoor and outdoor dining in the state.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

Students from state high schools will have a shot at athletic competition this fall.

Earlier this year, the state governing body of high school sports stopped play because of the COVID-19 pandemic. But now, the Connecticut Interscholastic Athletic Conference has a plan for Connecticut student-athletes to play in games starting Sept. 24 -- with pandemic-friendly adjustments.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

Some of the more controversial aspects of police reform that’ve been debated on the streets of Connecticut are now law.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

After a tumultuous week filled with legislative outrage, sniping between energy companies, and consumer sticker shock at rising utility bills, state regulators on Friday announced they would temporarily suspend a controversial rate increase for energy company Eversource.

Courtesy: Griebel Frank campaign

There has been a massive outpouring of tributes from around Connecticut to the late Oz Griebel. The well-loved business leader and two-time gubernatorial candidate died July 29, days after being struck by a car while jogging. He was 71 years old. 

Kittens are finding homes fast during the pandemic
Ali Warshavsky / WNPR

Annamarie Koch took an old English bulldog into her Ansonia home this spring.

“My husband is an essential worker, so he was never home and I was home all the time,” she said. “I was lonely.”

Don McCullough / Creative Commons

The delicate balancing act of anticipating electric demand before and during the COVID-19 pandemic has thrown electricity suppliers, regulators and customers an unwelcome surprise this summer: massive jumps on electric bills. 

Genovese basil is the basil cooks reach for when making pesto.
Pixabay

Basil is one of those quintessential tastes of summer. Growing up, it reminds me of my mom's eggplant parmesan, Caprese salad and tomato sauce. You can't grow tomatoes without growing some basil.

Oz Griebel, Civic Leader And Two-Time Gubernatorial Candidate, Dies

Jul 30, 2020
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Oz Griebel, the exuberant Hartford business leader who waged uphill races for governor as a Republican in 2010 and an independent in 2018, has died from complications arising from being struck by a motor vehicle while jogging on July 21 in Pennsylvania. He was 71.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Attorney General Bill Barr faced pointed questions on a range of issues at a House Judiciary Committee hearing this week. Connecticut Public Radio’s Morning Edition host Diane Orson reached out to Jim Himes, the state’s 4th District congressman, for his reaction. Himes, a member of the House Intelligence Committee, questioned Robert Mueller last year on the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.  

Stamford youth finish up a workout with police
Ali Warshavsky / WNPR

Stamford Police Chief Tim Shaw was sworn in during the height of the pandemic. And now that the state is reopening -- and embarking on a serious debate about the role of police -- it’s time to unify the community, he said.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

It’s been more than four months since Breonna Taylor was shot and killed in her home by Louisville Metro Police as they executed a no-knock search warrant. She was a 26-year-old Black woman who worked as an emergency medical technician and aspired to become a nurse.

And while rallies, protests and much of the media attention has been fixed on the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis, Connecticut activists continue to bring attention to violence committed against Black women and girls through policing and from systemic racism. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Neil Gilman makes football tackling dummies for a living. But when the pandemic hit, he had to get creative to save his business. He figured he’d try making medical gowns. And he started sending emails.  

Police Reforms Clear Connecticut Senate On Partisan Vote

Jul 29, 2020
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A divided state Senate shouldered past the fierce opposition of Connecticut police unions early Wednesday to vote 21-15 for final passage of a police accountability bill that both capitalizes on and addresses the outrage over the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. 

Courtesy: State of Connecticut

Secretary of the State Denise Merrill says that absentee ballots are mailed 21 days prior to a primary election. For this year’s Aug. 11 primary, that date was Tuesday, July 21. Now some voters have taken to social media to ask where their ballots are and when they can expect them to arrive.

Insulin, Telehealth Bills Headed For Governor’s Desk

Jul 28, 2020
Senators gather to debate four bills during a special session on July 28.
Mark Pazniokas / CTMirror.org

The state Senate gave final approval Tuesday to a pair of health bills that would cap the soaring cost of insulin in Connecticut and extend changes to telemedicine through March 2021.

Courtesy: Hartford Public Library

By way of mural design, performance, storytelling and photo documentation, a group of Hartford artists is embarking on a new project that celebrates the stories of Black, Latinx and Indigenous changemakers in Hartford. 

Socially Distanced Senate Passes No-Excuse Absentee Ballot Bill

Jul 28, 2020
Sen. Will Haskell, D-Westport, argued that minimizing crowds at the polls by allowing people to vote by absentee ballot contributes to public safety.
YEHYUN KIM / CTMirror.org

Meeting for the first time since COVID-19 forced the closure of the State Capitol in March, the Connecticut Senate voted 35-1 Tuesday for final passage of legislation allowing no-excuse absentee ballot voting as a public health precaution in November.

Barbara Dalio makes a point at second meeting of the Partnership for Connecticut in December.
Kathleen Megan / CTMirror.org

Two months after abandoning its private-public education partnership with the state, hedge fund giant Ray Dalio’s philanthropic group Dalio Education announced Monday that it would work with the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities to give another shot at ensuring students across the state have access to computers and internet connectivity.

Ali Warshavsky / Connecticut Public Radio

A lone table and two chairs were kept empty at the Valbella restaurant in Greenwich Monday to honor a famous regular: longtime TV host Regis Philbin, who died over the weekend at the age of 88.

View from Sabrina Buehler's AirBnB Rental in North Stonington
Sabrina Buehler

Sabrina Buehler didn’t expect to make much from her Airbnb rental in North Stonington this year due to the coronavirus pandemic. 

AP Photo/Mark Humphrey

The late civil rights icon John Lewis will lie in state at the Capitol Rotunda in Washington this week. He is to be buried on Thursday. 

Back in 2015, Lewis stood by the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. He had been brutally beaten there 50 years earlier while demonstrating for voting rights, and he said there was still work to be done. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Black Lives Matter murals have been popping up across the country since the killing of George Floyd by police. In Hartford, a mural is tucked away in the city’s North End, with another in the works downtown. And in Stamford, the affirmation Black Lives Matter has been painted on a main street.

Christine and Steve Schwartz interview job candidates in a parking lot outside their business, Express Employment Professionals in Shelton. Christine Schwartz says with the extra $600 unemployment benefit running out, more people are looking for work.
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

The weekly $600 in additional federal unemployment benefits -- a payment more than 20% of Connecticut’s workforce has been relying on -- disappeared as of July 25. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin last week announced a plan to replace it with a lower payment -- Republicans contend that the $600 per week discourages work.

Hospital staff thank local fire, police departments, and EMS as they pay tribute to the health care providers at Saint Mary's Hospital who are on the front lines taking care of patients with COVID-19 on April 10, 2020 in Waterbury, Connecticut.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Gov. Ned Lamont signed an executive order Friday creating a presumption that workers who became infected with COVID-19 in the early days of the pandemic contracted it on the job and are eligible for workers’ compensation benefits.

Doug Glanville in a file photo from 2015.
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The Boston Red Sox and New York Mets start their abbreviated seasons Friday. The Yankees kicked things off with a win Thursday in Washington. And players and teams across the league are addressing racial injustice in the wake of the killing of George Floyd. 

Police Reform Measure Passes Connecticut House

Jul 24, 2020
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state House of Representatives voted Friday morning to pass an ambitious proposal to reframe the training, oversight and accountability of a police profession under intense scrutiny across the U.S. since a police officer killed George Floyd two months ago in Minneapolis.

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