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Courtesy: Colvin Family

Though music lovers may have few opportunities to perform together in person right now, it turns out that people of all ages are discovering or rekindling a passion for music making at home during the pandemic. 

Courtesy: Jonathan Jennings

It’s been seven months since a large event like a wedding has been permitted indoors in Connecticut. Jonathan Jennings, executive vice president of the Connecticut Wedding Group, said it’s time to change that. 

 

Cloe Poisson / CT Mirror

Only two families have received aid in the five months since state officials established a program to help those struggling to pay rent during the pandemic, leaving a backlog of nearly 7,400 applications and growing frustration about the slow pace of the approval process.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Despite New England’s progressive reputation, residential segregation still exists in communities throughout the region. 

In this second episode of a special radio series on “Racism In New England,” we look at how housing laws and discrimination influence where we live — from the predominantly white states of northern New England to cities and suburbs in Massachusetts and Connecticut.

Premieres: Thursday, September 24, 2020

Check your station here for specific air dates in New England.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

A psychiatric facility in eastern Connecticut has been cited by federal workplace safety inspectors for alleged safety violations during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration has proposed around $13,500 in penalties for Natchaug Hospital in Mansfield.

Hartford Police (screen grab)

A video featuring a police encounter with a Black person -- this time a Hartford woman -- is again highlighting the tense relationship between law enforcement and the communities it serves.

Tomwsulcer / Wikimedia Commons

Amid a lot of talk about whether K-12 kids should go back to the classroom is the disturbing truth that it increasingly seems as if there aren’t enough teachers to lead their classes. 

Connecticut Bill Would Invite Competition To Run Energy Efficiency Programs

Sep 22, 2020
Chion Wolf / WNPR

A proposal buried at the end of Connecticut’s so-called “take back our grid” legislation would potentially make utilities compete for control of the energy efficiency programs they’ve operated for more than 20 years. 

And that has some lawmakers and contractors asking: Why?

Mystic Aquarium Restructures For COVID — And Beyond

Sep 22, 2020
Mark Pazniokas / CT Mirror

A beluga whale glided to the edge of the platform overlooking its 750,000-gallon habitat and looked up, seemingly joining the Mystic Aquarium’s president, Stephen M. Coan, in greeting Gov. Ned Lamont and his economic adviser, David Lehman.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Less than a week after Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death, her vacant seat on the U.S. Supreme Court has set up what is sure to be a contentious battle among legislators on how to proceed.

However uncertain that process may be, the court is still set to hear arguments beginning a week after the presidential election for a case challenging the constitutionality of the Affordable Care Act. 

VA Connecticut Hiring Practices Under Investigation

Sep 22, 2020
 Sandra Salmon, president of the American Federation of Government Employees Local 2138, filed the Special Counsel complaint.
Melanie Stengel / Connecticut Health I-Team

The U.S. Office of Special Counsel is investigating allegations of illegal employment practices at VA Connecticut Healthcare System connected to the hiring of seven employees­­—some in top management positions­—who are all former co-workers of the system’s director.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

Union officials are raising concerns that retail giant Amazon is unnecessarily exposing Connecticut residents to COVID-19 -- as well as taking jobs they believe should go to local workers.

Pandemic Deals Another Blow To Nursing Homes: Plummeting Occupancy

Sep 21, 2020
An employee at nursing facility Kimberly Hall South in Windsor visits with a resident through her window in May.
DAVE WURTZEL / CONNECTICUT PUBLIC / DAVE WURTZEL / CONNECTICUT PUBLIC

While the deadly coronavirus seems to be subsiding in Connecticut for now, its impact on nursing homes has not. More than 6,700 beds are empty, and it may take many months of financial struggle before occupancy climbs back to pre-pandemic levels.

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

As the dry weather continues in Connecticut, state officials on Monday asked residents of New London County to voluntarily cut back on outdoor irrigation and other nonessential uses of water. 

TUT.by / Associated Press

U.S. Sen. Chris Murphy of Connecticut has joined with colleagues on both sides of the aisle to introduce a resolution in support of the people of Belarus.  

School buses
Yehyun Kim / CTMirror.org

 

More than a dozen schools in Connecticut have gone remote in recent days as COVID-19 outbreaks flared up. Public health officials and school administrators spent the summer trying to craft plans that would avoid shutdowns and keep students in school as long as possible. Other schools seem set on staying open even if their plans don’t end up working out. 

Crowd gathers in Stamford to remember Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Ali Warshavsky / Connecticut Public Radio

More than 100 people gathered in front of the Stamford courthouse Sunday to remember Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died Friday at 87 years old. 

AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais

Tributes to the life and work of late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg have come in from across Connecticut.

Heat lamps are up at Milestone in Redding for outdoor dining this fall
Ali Warshavsky / WNPR

As the seasons begin to change and the weather gets colder, restaurant owners are urging Gov. Ned Lamont to expand indoor dining and provide broader guidelines for indoor events. Otherwise, some say they won’t survive.

Brad Rippey / U.S. Department of Agriculture

Drought conditions in the state continue to worsen with federal agencies now saying a portion of land along the Connecticut-Rhode Island border is experiencing “extreme” drought conditions. 

Clinical staff members coronavirus drive-through test
Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

Connecticut's coronavirus infection rate has risen to 1.6 percent -- after spending most of the summer under 1 percent.  Gov. Ned Lamont described the climbing number of positive tests as "concerning" this week, although the administration insists the resumption of in-person instruction in K-12 schools isn't behind the rise in cases.

Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

Connecticut recently passed a police accountability bill after the killing of George Floyd by police in Minneapolis. Though the bill is now law, legislative candidates who oppose it are using it as a political issue.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Eversource has hardly been out of the news since the prolonged restoration of power in the wake of Tropical Storm Isaias. And the latest headline concerns a $700 million loan the utility says it would like the state to underwrite. 

Students get off a bus on the first day of school in Connecticut. The first few days will be about setting expectations for mask wearing and social distancing according to superindendents.
Ali Oshinskie / Connecticut Public Radio

The first day of school always comes with transition. But as districts across the state open up classrooms and laptops this year, back to school will require a different kind of adjustment given the ongoing pandemic. Superintendents say they have a new set of expectations for the first few weeks of school. 

coronavirus testing
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Some COVID-19 patients recover from the virus relatively quickly, but others have to deal with lingering or even new symptoms months after battling the virus. Ellie Stevenson of Norwalk says she is what’s called a long hauler.

Patrick Skahill

State officials say a forest fire in Windham is getting under control, but it could continue to smolder over the coming weeks if statewide drought conditions worsen. 

Turns out, birds love to eat persimmons, too.
Rick Derevan (Flickr / Creative Commons)

Usually when I think of fall fruit trees, I think of apples and pears. They're great but there's another fruit tree that I've grown for a while now and it's a beauty.  

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Weeks of state investigations, monitoring and intervention at Three Rivers Nursing Home in Norwich following a COVID-19 outbreak has culminated in the imminent relocation of all residents.

In a rare and unprecedented move, the Department of Public Health's acting commissioner Deidre Gifford signed an emergency order Wednesday requiring the facility to discharge its 53 residents to other long-term care facilities. 

Jeff Amy / AP Photo

U.S. Sen. Richard Blumenthal wants answers after hearing a report of forced sterilizations carried out on migrant detainees at an ICE detention facility.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public Radio


Back in August, families with children in Hartford Public Schools responded to an online survey aimed at finding out the reasons behind their decision to send their kids back to school.

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