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Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A law passed this legislative session would have protected restaurant owners who are being sued over a provision in minimum wage law. But that bill was vetoed by Governor Ned Lamont and lawmakers have decided to let his veto stand.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

A road that cuts through a dusty Connecticut farm bisects what could be the past and future of Connecticut farming. On one side is broadleaf tobacco, a staple crop of Connecticut farms for generations. On the other, delicate hemp plants, swaying in the July heat. 

Wayzaro Walton (middle, pictured at a rally organized on her behalf in Hartford in December 2018) was apprehended by federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents on Tuesday, March 26 while participating in an immigration check-in.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A federal court in Boston hears arguments Tuesday that will center, in part, on whether Immigration and Customs Enforcement has the right to deport immigrants for past crimes - despite a state pardon.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The National Weather Service placed Connecticut under an “excessive heat watch” this weekend. Just after noon on Saturday in Middletown, the temperature climbed to 100 degrees, according to Weather.com. It felt like 113 degrees as stifling humidity enveloped the air.

CT Science Center

Connecticut-based architect Cesar Pelli died Friday. 

His work is world-renowned – breaking out after being picked to redesign the Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan.

Study: Segregation Is Key Factor For Racial Disparity In Police Shootings

Jul 21, 2019
Pixabay.com

Nationwide, police shoot black people at a rate three times higher than white people. Between 2013 and 2018, 28% of police shooting victims were black, twice their proportion of the overall population, according to the Mapping Police Violence Project.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Puerto Ricans are vowing to continue their protests of the island’s leadership until one major demand is met.

Michael Hamann / Creative Commons

Jim Webb has been drinking the tap water in his Glastonbury home for 15 years. When he first bought the house, he got the water tested, because it comes from a private well.

Courtesy: NEAG School of Education, UConn

The State Board of Education voted six to one Thursday to endorse Gov. Ned Lamont’s selection of Miguel Cardona, Meriden’s assistant superintendent, as the state’s next education commission. 

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Saturday, July 20th marks the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon Landing. Several Connecticut companies played an important role in the historic mission.

82 year-old Donald Rethke was a mechanical engineer at Hamilton Standard in Windsor Locks in 1969. He helped design the life support systems and the heating system on the lunar module used in the moon landing.

Petteri Jarvinen / Flickr

The forecast projects one of the hottest weekends across Connecticut so far this year, with temperatures expected to rise into the triple digits. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Evan Matthews, head of the quasi-public agency responsible for promoting investments in Connecticut’s three deepwater ports, has been placed on administrative leave. 

The news comes as the state continues work to finalize a $93 million public-private investment in New London’s State Pier. 

FRANKIE GRAZIANO / CONNECTICUT PUBLIC RADIO

The AARP Foundation and a New Haven law firm have filed a class action lawsuit against Yale University over how the college implements its employee wellness program.

The lawsuit claims that Yale’s wellness program, which is marketed as a resource to help employees and their spouses improve their health, violates several discrimination and health privacy laws, including the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act.

File Photo

For generations, librarians assumed the threat of fines incentivized people to bring back books on time. But lately, that assumption has been coming under scrutiny, leaving many librarians to wonder if the idea of fines is one whose time may be past due. 

Amy the Nurse / FLICKR

Sometimes flowers take a while to catch on. Consider the zinnia. This popular annual flower was first discovered in its native Mexico by the Spanish. They thought it was so unattractive they called it “mal de ojos” or sickness of the eyes. Not a great beginning for a flower. But after years of breeding, the zinnia has been transformed into one of my favorite summer bloomers.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Lawmakers will meet up in Hartford Monday to discuss bills vetoed by Governor Ned Lamont. Lamont recently vetoed three bills. One – an act requiring a study of workforce training needs in the state – includes a proposal related to wages for restaurant wait staff.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Following multiple fatal shootings in Hartford last week, Mothers United Against Violence is holding a series of vigils to honor the victims. They've been organized to give the community an opportunity to grieve, come together and be encouraged.

State Changes Course On Education Commissioner

Jul 17, 2019
Courtesy: NEAG School of Education, UConn

In a dramatic reversal, Miguel Cardona, an assistant superintendent in Meriden, is expected to be chosen as Connecticut’s next state education commissioner, rather than Bloomfield Superintendent James Thompson, sources close to the search committee said Tuesday. 

Keith Phaneuf / CT Mirror

The governors of Connecticut, Rhode Island and Massachusetts say they’re looking forward to closer cooperation on transportation, renewable energy initiatives and perhaps on purchasing services like IT and healthcare.

Ned Lamont invited his fellow governors Gina Raimondo and Charlie Baker for an informal conference at Eastern Connecticut State University in Willimantic Tuesday. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

City leaders in Hartford are asking residents for help in the fight against a recent uptick in gun violence.

Campobello Whale Rescue

A showdown over lobsters and whales appears to be brewing between Maine and the federal government.

Under direction from Gov. Janet Mills, the Maine Department of Marine Resources is telling federal regulators that the state will not accept their targets for reducing risk that endangered North Atlantic right whales will be entangled in rope the state's lobstermen use to tend their gear. 

Jade Allen / Connecticut Public Radio

The case of New Haven woman Salma Sikandar remains in limbo after a hearing before an immigration judge Monday. Sikander, who’s originally from Bangladesh, is subject to a deportation order, but her attorney is arguing for clemency. So far it is unclear when the judge will give the ruling.

Lamont Would Ease 'Debt Diet' In Final Push For Tolls

Jul 15, 2019
Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont is making a final push to salvage tolls this year and its success could hinge on the limit he and lawmakers set on Connecticut’s credit card.

The governor is asking fellow Democrats to consider a scaled-back proposal that would place tolls only in strategic locations — such as aging bridges. 

Professor Bop / Creative Commons

It appears Connecticut -- along with the rest of the country -- was spared massive ICE raids over the weekend that had been promised by President Trump. But advocates for immigrants' rights say the administration's stance is still having a marked effect.

Lynne Sladky / Associated Press

Connecticut Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro says the federal government must do more to move migrant children out of crowded detention centers. DeLauro spoke after touring the Homestead Temporary Influx Facility in Florida Monday, with several of her Democratic colleagues from the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health, Human Services and Education. 

RHODA BAER / NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE / CREATIVE COMMONS

A civil lawsuit being brought by two Bristol parents against the state Department of Public Health over school vaccination data was delayed in court Monday as attorneys for the state try to get the case tossed.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

A rise in the number of shootings in Hartford over the past few weeks is concerning residents and police. It's not uncommon for violence to spike during summers in the city but it's not something that goes unnoticed.

Dyzhae Richardson was standing outside on Sisson Avenue talking to a friend when he heard gunshots. He tried to duck but it was too late—he'd been shot. He looked down and saw blood on his hands. It was the morning of June 30th.

Keith Allison / Creative Commons

Families in Connecticut and across the country who are here illegally are bracing for raids this weekend, as agents with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, are expected to target some 2,000 people with deportation orders in at least 10 cities.

Even though the names of Connecticut cities have not been circulated as targets, families here are still worried about being separated.

This Project ChildSafe lock is type of cable lock. The long braided steel cable is stuck down the ejection port and down the magazine well of the gun. The end of the cord fits into the large padlock with a key used to secure the device.
Paul Rubiera / WUNC

Since 2005, if you purchase a gun in the United States, you’re going to be given a free gun lock. It’s a federal law. But many gun safety experts don’t believe the most popular kind of these locks are effective at keeping people, especially older children, from gaining access.

Lori Mack / Connecticut Public Radio

Forensic expert Dr. Henry Lee is standing by his testimony in a three-decades-old murder trial. This is the third case from the 1980s, in which Lee has now been accused of offering inaccurate testimony. 

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