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Travis Isaacs / Creative Commons

Humans typically make enough collective noise to keep the earth vibrating at a steady hum. But the pandemic has quieted that hum enough to let seismologists study the vibrations that can be hard to detect in the din of our noise.

Brownstone Exploration & Discovery Park Portland
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Connecticut, New York and New Jersey officials are now considering imposing a self-testing or quarantining order on people coming in from other areas of the U.S. with high COVID-19 infection rates, Gov. Ned Lamont said Monday.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

State officials have announced that they’re scaling back COVID-19 testing at nursing homes and assisted living facilities. It’s a policy shift that comes as a major union representing eldercare workers said 14 of its members died after contracting COVID-19. 

Lamont Backs GOP Plan For $450 Back-To-Work Incentive

Jun 18, 2020
Gov. Ned Lamont
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Gov. Ned Lamont came out Thursday in favor of a Republican congressional plan to pay a one-time $450 stipend to people who return to work rather than extending a federal program that provides $600 a week in added jobless benefits.

Picasa / Google

Scientists say humans don't know how to breathe very well. We don't breathe deep enough, we breathe too much, and we breathe through our mouths instead of our noses. Our bad breathing can lead to conditions that we don't typically associate with the way we breathe, such as asthma.

Ascalon Studios

We have spent the last few months bringing you coverage on COVID-19. This hour, we’re going to talk to someone who was diagnosed with coronavirus, and recovered. For those that survive the virus, the recovery process is not easy. Many have long-lasting side effects from having the virus, including permanent damage to the heart and lungs.

Meli-Melo Creperie Juice Bar & Cafe reopening connecticut phase two
Mark Lennihan / AP Photo

Some Connecticut businesses and organizations were allowed to open back up under the second phase of Gov. Ned Lamont’s reopening plan Wednesday -- but many did not. Amusement parks, health centers, libraries and movie theaters have announced opening dates for later in June or even this summer. 

face mask
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Denise Rogers said all she did was get up and go to work. A few days later, she was hospitalized and her husband of more than 20 years was dead. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

One day before the state embarks on the second phase of its business reopenings, Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont said Tuesday that state COVID-19 public health numbers continue their positive trend. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Connecticut has been running more COVID-19 tests in recent weeks, but the state’s testing volume is still far short of Gov. Ned Lamont’s goal for Phase 2 of Connecticut’s reopening, which is scheduled for Wednesday.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

A greater portion of COVID-19 tests have come back negative in Connecticut compared with other states, which the Governor’s team says is a good sign.

But who should be getting tested as the state rolls out its phase two reopening on Wednesday?

This hour, we talk with Governor Lamont’s Chief Operating Officer Josh Geballe about this latest phase of reopening Connecticut's economy. And we hear from Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin about the state's latest testing guidance for city residents. We ask: should asymptomatic people get a COVID-19 test?

Later in the hour, we also hear a story from Connecticut Public reporter Frankie Graziano, about grieving the loss of a loved one during a pandemic.

Blame Luck Or Safety Protocols, But Some Nursing Homes Remain COVID-19 Free

Jun 16, 2020
Jay Katz
Melanie Stengel / Connecticut Health I-Team

The coronavirus has decimated many of the nation’s nursing homes, where elderly, chronically ill residents account for 64% of Connecticut’s death toll of 4,201 and rising. They are roughly 100 times more likely to die of the virus than other people in the state.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Connecticut reported its lowest number of one-day deaths due to the coronavirus Monday, as the state prepares for a second round of business openings Wednesday.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

With the second phase of Gov. Ned Lamont’s plan to reopen state businesses set for Wednesday, the governor’s office announced Saturday afternoon that the number of patients currently hospitalized with COVID-19 continued to decline. The governor’s office said 233 patients are hospitalized in Connecticut with COVID-19 -- 11 fewer than Friday. 

New Haven Correctional Center
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Department of Correction Commissioner Rollin Cook will resign his position effective July 1, Gov. Ned Lamont's office announced Friday. 

AP Photo/Mary Altaffer

Gov. Ned Lamont urged residents Thursday to see the reopening of the economy as a chance to restart. Meanwhile, a new COVID-19 antibody testing program is set to begin in Connecticut to combat the virus, and state officials announced a new job training program that will launch alongside the next phase of the state’s reopening efforts on June 17. 

Governor Ned Lamont
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

It’s been more than three months since the first Connecticut resident tested positive for the coronavirus. Connecticut Public Radio recently produced a two-hour special on this time period, First Wave: Coronavirus in Connecticut. This is an excerpt from that show -- an interview with Governor Ned Lamont who looks back at his administration’s response to the pandemic.

COVID-19 testing
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Every Thursday, a researcher from Yale University picks up a cooler from the East Shore Water Pollution Abatement Facility in New Haven.

In that cooler is a week’s worth of samples from the sewer system that experts call “sludge,” or the solid waste that is left over after treating wastewater. It can contain a mixture of chemicals, metals and remnants of human waste that is flushed down the toilet. 

Tameeka Coleman, a single mother who was previously homeless and living on the streets, was able to find a condo through the nonprofit Alpha Community Services, YMCA, in Bridgeport.
Contributed photo

Tameeka Coleman and six of her children lived on the streets before moving into a shelter in Fairfield.

“We were together, so it was bearable,” Coleman, 38, said. The hardest part was when her children cried for their home. “They wanted to know how we had lost our apartment,” said Coleman, who was evicted after she couldn’t pay the rent.   

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

A group of health officials gathered in Geneva, Switzerland, to discuss infectious disease learn that forty-seven people at an internment camp in Indonesia have died from acute hemorrhagic fever.

This is how Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright, begins his new novel that in many ways, predicts the pandemic we're currently experiencing. He joins us to talk about it. 

Ebony Barnes 44, (center) of Bridgeport during the Caravan 4 Justice gather at the Connecticut State Capitol to peacefully demonstrate against the systematic abuse of police power perpetrated against the black community on June 7, 2020 in Hartford.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

A caravan of cars that began in Stamford and stopped in four other towns before making its way to the state Capitol in Hartford on Sunday was among dozens of rallies, demonstrations and protests over the weekend after the recent death of George Floyd. 

Hundreds of doctors and other medical personnel Friday took a knee in front of the Yale School of Medicine to demonstrate their solidarity with the Black Lives Matter movement.
Emily Hays / New Haven Independent

Thousands of demonstrators across Connecticut joined protest marches and rallies Saturday in the growing movement for racial justice triggered by the Minneapolis police killing of George Floyd and other incidents of police violence against people of color.

Lamont Makes A Father’s Day Gesture To Restaurants

Jun 5, 2020
Diners on the patio of Mondo’s in Middletown on May 20, the first day restaurants were allowed to open for outdoor dining.
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

Gov. Ned Lamont, whose administration has been facing intense lobbying by the restaurant industry over COVID-19 restrictions, made a modest concession Friday by allowing indoor dining on June 17, three days ahead of the previously scheduled second phase of reopening on June 20.

Owning a handgun significantly increases one’s risk of suicide, according to a study published Thursday that tracked new gun owners in California for more than a decade.

Mental health experts and researchers have long known that gun ownership suggests an increased risk of suicide, but the study published in the New England Journal of Medicine adds a new level of detail.

COVID-19 testing at the Urgent Care Center of Connecticut on March 25, 2020 in Bloomfield, Connecticut.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Towns and cities facing mounting costs associated with COVID-19 will get some help as they close out their budgets for the fiscal year. The state also announced Thursday that unemployment remains at historic highs, though new weekly claims are slowing.

Gov. Ned Lamont said $75 million has been allocated for the creation of a Connecticut Municipal Coronavirus Relief Fund Program to help towns and cities cover costs associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. 

HARTFORD, CT- May 12,2020: Monique Coleman receives a COVID-19 test at a newly opened mobile testing center in the north end of Hartford.
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

State and social service leaders announced a new public-private program Wednesday to help undocumented immigrants through economic hardships caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Later in the day, education officials announced that in-person high school graduations, with graduates able to sit together, can begin in July.

Vape Marketing Linked To COVID-19 Draws Critics

Jun 2, 2020
Vernon Police Officer Joshua Wells holds an e-cigarette that contained THC “juice,” the active ingredient in marijuana.
Kate Farrish / Connecticut Health I-Team

Vape manufacturers have long been accused of marketing to teens with flavors like mango and cotton candy. Now vaping opponents say vape manufacturers are exploiting the coronavirus with face mask and hand sanitizer giveaways and #COVID-19 discounts.

As Barbershops, Hair Salons, Casinos Open, $619.9 Million State Deficit Projected Due To COVID-19

Jun 1, 2020
SHELTON, CT - MAY 12, Hair Stylist Georgeanne DeCosta works in close clipping the hair of her 5 year old son Rock that is going to grow out into a mohawk in their home on May 12, 2020 in Shelton, Connecticut.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Hair salons, barbershops and casinos reopened in Connecticut Monday after being closed for more than two months due to COVID-19 restrictions and precautions. Along with the good news of these reopenings came grim new projections from the state comptroller about the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Gerry Lauzon / Creative Commons

The pandemic has laid bare how racism in housing, education, employment, and access to health care, disproportionately hurts Black Americans more than White Americans and leads to police brutality against people the police are supposed to protect.

Disparities In Hispanic And Black Death Rates Much Worse Than Previously Reported

May 31, 2020
A hearse leads a funeral procession for Hazel Bailey to her burial service at Mountain View Cemetery in Bloomfield. Bailey, an African-American, died of COVID-19 on April 19 at age 73.
Cloe Poisson / CTMirror.org

After reporting for weeks that Connecticut Hispanics are only half as likely to die from COVID-19 as non-Hispanic whites, state officials now say that Hispanics here are substantially more likely to die from the disease.

State officials were also reporting that the state’s black population was only 26% more likely than whites to die from a coronavirus infection when in fact their likelihood of death is 2.5 times as high.  The death rate for Hispanics is now calculated at 67% higher than non-Hispanic whites.

Why the change? And why were they getting it wrong?

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