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Connecticut's Big City Mayors Call For Help For Renters During Pandemic

15 hours ago
for rent sign
KentWeakley/iStock / Thinkstock

Connecticut’s official coronavirus death toll rose by another 58 people Wednesday, bringing the state’s total since the start of the pandemic to 335, the state announced Wednesday. The number of people hospitalized for COVID-19 increased by 110 to a current total of 1,418.

gloves
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

A national shortage of personal protective equipment has left states and individual providers scrambling to find new supplies as COVID-19 continues to spread.

Meanwhile, Connecticut health care workers are coming into direct contact with infected patients, and not just at the hospitals. Nurses and home health aides said rationing and reusing respirator masks, gloves, gowns and other equipment has been distressing. 

Wallpaperflare.com / Google Images

Your sex life doesn't have to suffer just because you're cooped up at home every day. Sex researchers say that sex is a healthy way to calm the anxiety of pandemic, even if you live alone. Virtual dating, masturbation, and coronavirus-related porn are more popular than ever. 

social distancing
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Gov. Ned Lamont said Tuesday that Connecticut’s social distancing measures to flatten the rate of coronavirus infections seem to be paying off -- striking a hopeful note even as the state’s death toll rose to 277.

Health care workers face tough decisions to protect their loved ones from potential exposure to the new coronavirus. Two doctors in New Haven, Connecticut, shared their plans to self-isolate and keep their daughters safe at home.

social distancing, protest
Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

The spread of COVID-19 in state prisons comes as Connecticut experienced its largest one-month reduction in prison population in history, according to the state Department of Correction. 

COVID-19 testing
Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

We’re at the point in this pandemic where many of us know at least one person who has tested positive for coronavirus.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This hour, Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont is calling in to give us the latest on the state’s response to coronavirus

medical equipment
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public

A tremendous amount of research already tells us that not everyone has the same access to health services and high quality of care, or in other words, health equity. It’s well documented that black, Hispanic, and other minority residents often suffer worse health outcomes than their white counterparts.

prison gate
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

This post has been updated.

As the number of Connecticut’s new coronavirus cases continues to grow, Gov. Ned Lamont signed another executive order Sunday aiming to provide legal immunity to health care workers facing life-or-death decisions for patients in their care. 

COVID-19 Still Hitting Hardest In Fairfield, New Haven Counties

Apr 4, 2020
Connecticut National Guard
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Another 124 COVID-19 patients were hospitalized and 33 died overnight and early Saturday in Connecticut, a state bracing for a surge of novel coronavirus cases expected to peak by month’s end in Fairfield County. The death toll associated with the virus is now 165, and current hospitalizations reached 1,033.

Connecticut Air National Guard
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Connecticut officials are bracing themselves for a peak in coronavirus cases to hit Fairfield County in mid-to-late April, before the virus surges across New Haven, Hartford and eastern Connecticut, according to case models released Friday.

Five inmates in the Cybulski building at the Willard-Cybulski Correctional Institution in Enfield have tested positive for COVID-19. The entire facility is now on lockdown.
file photo / Connecticut Public

This story was updated at 1:32 p.m. with a comment from the Lamont administration. 

The ACLU of Connecticut has filed a lawsuit to force Gov. Ned Lamont and Department of Correction Commissioner Rollin Cook to reduce the number of people incarcerated in Connecticut prisons and jails.

Lars Klintwall Malmqvist / Wikipedia

I’ve been a producer here at Connecticut Public since 2007, and since then, our team that’s reported on some really difficult times. And now? We’re all trying to make sense of this unprecedented era of Covid-19.

After we all started working from home, I kept seeing these painful stories of layoffs and panic. But there were also stories about the Helpers who are trying to make sense of all this, who are trying to ease the pain.

That’s who you’ll hear from on this show. Every week, you’ll hear from people who are struggling in the chaos of this virus, people who are helping get us through each day, and, because they have a much needed perspective, you’ll hear from children.

soldier in mask
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Is this starting to feel normal yet? It remains remarkable how many things have changed and are continuing to change. One example is the thinking around masks. 

CT Governor Ned Lamont
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

This post has been updated.

The state fielded 40,000 more unemployment claims over the last 18 days than it did for all of last year. 

It’s a staggering number, one that comes as the state government awaits its share of a $2 trillion federal relief package that could take until the end of April to arrive. And it’s just one more measure of the financial impact of the coronavirus pandemic in the state.

Gov. Ned Lamont
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Over the last two weeks, 10 million Americans have filed for unemployment benefits. Last week’s report of 3.3 million new claims was astronomically high. This week’s numbers doubled that.

national guard
Ryan Caron King/Connecticut Public

This post has been updated.

Two state universities are transforming athletic centers into mobile field hospitals in anticipation of a COVID-19 patient surge. The move comes as the state enters what’s expected to be its worst month of illness, death and hospitalization ushered in by a worldwide pandemic -- a surge marked by the state’s first reported infant death from the coronavirus.

Caution tape lines a playground in Weatogue, CT, a village in Simsbury.
Julianne Varacchi / Connecticut Public

March felt like a long, crazy month. April is expected to be worse. 

President Donald Trump told Americans on Tuesday “to be prepared for the hard days that lie ahead." Meanwhile, Gov. Ned Lamont warned that “April will be a horrible month.”

national guard
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

As Connecticut’s death toll nearly doubled Tuesday and the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases rose by 557 in 24 hours, Gov. Ned Lamont delivered a bleak message to the state’s residents about a lack of critical supplies needed to fight the pandemic.

A mobile field hospital being erected by the Governor's Foot and Horse Guard on the grounds of Saint Francis Hospital on March 24, 2020 in Hartford, Connecticut.
Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

The death toll from COVID-19 in the United States has surpassed the number of people killed on 9/11. The two events can’t be directly compared, but there have been striking similarities: the fear of what’s to come, racism, and a stepped up law enforcement presence.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Connecticut hospitals are receiving more patients ill with COVID-19 as the new coronavirus continues to spread rapidly.

Public health experts predict that hospitalization rates will get worse in the coming weeks, putting a burden on health care professionals who are also trying to protect themselves and other patients from becoming infected. 

As COVID-19 Cases Soar, State, Feds and Hospitals Look For Patient Overflow Sites

Mar 30, 2020
HARTFORD, CT - March 24, A mobile field hospital being erected by the Governor’s Foot and Horse Guard on the grounds of Saint Francis Hospital on March 24, 2020 in Hartford, Connecticut.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Updated 7:30 p.m. 

The spread of coronavirus continued to accelerate in Connecticut Monday with an additional 578 confirmed COVID-19 cases reported in just 24 hours, another 113 people hospitalized and the death toll now listed  at 36.

Marta Hart, medical assistant and x-ray technician, administering a COVID-19 test outside of the facility at the Urgent Care Center of Connecticut on March 25, 2020 in Bloomfield, Connecticut.
Joe Amon/Connecticut Public/NENC

As the number of cases, hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19 continues to climb, officials expect the peak will hit Connecticut in less than two weeks.

Cathy Baird / Creative Commons

William Wetmore Story sculpted "The Angel of Grief," for his wife's grave after her death in 1894. He wrote that it was the only way he could express his feelings of "utter abandonment." It was his last work before his own death one year later. 

We may not readily identify grief in the gamut of emotions we're feeling during this pandemic. We haven't lost the kind of love expressed through William Story's sculpture but loss is very much at the center of our new reality. We are collectively grieving the loss of a world that has changed forever.  

BLOOMFIELD, CT - March 25, 2020 -- COVID-19 Marta Hart, medical assistant and x-ray technician, packaging a COVID-19 test at the Urgent Care Center of Connecticut.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

This post has been updated.

After suggesting earlier in the day that much of the Northeast’s tri-state region could soon be subject to an “enforceable” quarantine, President Donald Trump abruptly reversed course Saturday night.

BLOOMFIELD, CT - March 25, COVID-19 Marta Hart, medical assistant and x-ray technician, administering a COVID-19 test outside of the facility at the Urgent Care Center of Connecticut on March 25, 2020 in Bloomfield, Connecticut.
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Coronavirus deaths and infections continued to rise in Connecticut Friday as officials reported that 39 percent of the state’s 6,800 hospital beds are currently available to treat people seriously ill from the disease.

Gov. Ned Lamont said 1,291 people have now tested positive for COVID-19 in this state, with 271 new infections, 27 deaths, and 173 people in the hospital.

“That’s the beginning of the surge, the beginning of folks going into the ICUs needing hospitalization,” Lamont said during his Friday afternoon briefing.

There's plenty in the coronavirus relief package passed by Congress to help low-income Americans, including billions of dollars in housing assistance, foreclosure and eviction relief, expanded unemployment benefits, and one-time cash payments.

But advocates for the poor say it's only a first step and that those at the lower end of the economic scale will need much more help in the months ahead.

Hartford Hospital
Dave Wurtzel / Connecticut Public

It’s now been three weeks since the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Connecticut. It seems like nearly every part of life has changed -- and it’s exhausting.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Gov. Ned Lamont said he asked the federal government on Thursday to declare a major disaster in Connecticut as the number of COVID-19 cases in the state surpassed 1,000.  

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