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Health

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

COVID-19 cases continue to grow in Connecticut. And although the governor’s office has rolled the state’s reopening back not all municipal leaders think it’s enough.

This hour, we talk with New Haven Mayor Justin Elicker, who’s called for a further rollback that would halt indoor dining.  What impact would this have on Elm City businesses?

And we find out how students in New Haven are doing. Most haven’t had in-person school since the spring. 

Are you a New Haven resident? We take your questions and comments for the mayor.

Later in the hour, we check in with Yale New Haven Hospital. With rising cases, how is hospital capacity holding up?

State Panel Weighs Who Should Be First In Line For COVID Vaccine

Nov 20, 2020
Rhoda Baer/National Cancer Institute / Creative Commons

At least 10 of Connecticut’s 27 acute care hospitals have the “ultracold” storage needed to stow the COVID-19 vaccine being developed by Pfizer – which must be kept at a temperature between -112 to -76 degrees Fahrenheit – and all hospitals that are part of a larger health system have indicated they have access to the icy storage and a means of transport for the immunizations, a state health official said Thursday.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public

State public health officials say 145 towns are now at the highest alert level for COVID-19.

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public

Federal workplace safety officials have fined Lawrence + Memorial Hospital in New London after an employee there contracted COVID-19 and later died.

DVIDSHUB / Creative Commons

A settlement was reached in a nationwide class action lawsuit against the Army that will help veterans with less than honorable discharges struggling with behavioral health issues gain access to care they need.

As the nation gears up for a massive vaccination effort, the Trump administration is doubling down on a novel, unproven injection device by providing more than half a billion dollars in government financing for something still awaiting Food and Drug Administration approval.

Signs posted at the entrance to the grocery store in northwest Montana told customers to wear a mask. Public health officials in Flathead County urged the same. Coronavirus infection rates here are among the highest in the state. Infection rates in the state are among the highest in the United States.

And still, Craig Mann walked out of the grocery store, past the signs and toward his truck, maskless and resolute.

The pandemic that everyone's talking about?

Courtesy: Purdue Pharma

A federal bankruptcy judge has approved an $8.3 billion settlement between Stamford’s Purdue Pharma and the U.S. Department of Justice. Connecticut is one of the states that brought suit against the drugmaker for its part in the opioid epidemic, and the state’s Attorney General, William Tong, has been outspoken in condemning the DOJ deal.

TYLER RUSSELL / Connecticut Public

Beginning Monday, Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks will add a drive-thru COVID-19 testing site open to travelers and all other community members.

The Connecticut Airport Authority is partnering with Hartford HealthCare to run the site in parking Lot 3 off Schoephoester Road. This will be the health organization’s ninth permanent testing location in the state. 

The United States has surpassed yet another devastating milestone in the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic: 250,000 Americans have now died from the disease. That's more than twice the number of U.S. service members killed in World War I.

Coronavirus case numbers are exploding across the country at the beginning of what is shaping up to be a difficult winter of illness in America.

Connecticut's Halfhearted Battle: Response To Lead Poisoning Epidemic Lacks Urgency

Nov 18, 2020
Melanie Stengel / C-HIT

It wasn’t until Bridgeport lead inspector Charles Tate stepped outside the house on Wood Avenue that he saw, immediately, where 2-year-old Rocio Valladares was being poisoned.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The holiday season is coming up, but Coronavirus cases are on the rise. This hour, we check in with Governor Ned Lamont. Many of us want to see our families, but is that the best thing to do for our state and our health?

Many of Connecticut's surrounding states have been placed on Connecticut’s travel advisory list. And Connecticut's own positivity rate is rising.

The University of Connecticut says it has placed all of its residential buildings on its Storrs campus under quarantine or modified quarantine for the rest of the in-person semester, which ends Nov. 20. In a statement, the university said the move was needed because of the “persistently high number of positive cases” of coronavirus. UConn reported seven new on-campus positive cases and 24 new off-campus positive cases. One more employee tested positive. In a letter sent Friday, UConn said it doesn’t have the spread of COVID under control.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

A statewide coalition of lawmakers, activists and health experts Thursday announced that health care reform will be a top priority heading into the next legislative session.

Coalition leaders at a news conference at the Capitol building said the COVID-19 pandemic and the recent election have become driving factors in reintroducing a plan for a public option health insurance program for Connecticut residents, small businesses and nonprofits. 

Sanofi Pasteur / Creative Commons

The Center on Climate Change and Health at the Yale School of Public Health has just released a report on climate change and health in Connecticut. It comes to some troubling conclusions and makes urgent calls to action. One of the authors of that report is Laura Bozzi, Ph.D. She outlined the report’s findings on Connecticut Public Radio’s All Things Considered.

Wikimedia Commons

Typically, the foot traffic in and out of the Wheeler Family Health and Wellness Center on Woodland Avenue in Hartford would be pretty steady.

But since the COVID-19 pandemic hit in March, Keturah Kinch said in-person activity has been a bit quieter. 

jwblinn/iStock / Thinkstock

The U.S. Supreme Court’s new 6-3 conservative majority was assumed by many to be the death knell for the Affordable Care Act. But a funny thing seems to have happened Tuesday during oral arguments. Conservative Justices John Roberts and Brett Kavanaugh appeared to indicate their support for leaving the ACA intact -- with the exception of the individual mandate. 

lesjbohlen / Pixabay

COVID cases in Connecticut continue to rise, and the majority of residents now live in what the state defines as “red zones”. Governor Lamont has ordered a voluntary curfew and the state has required restaurants to begin shutting down starting at 9:30 p.m., with doors closed by 10 p.m.

But what will this mean for an industry already on a knife’s edge financially?

We hear from a restaurant owner and an industry leader.

And, with winter approaching, is there a way to enjoy restaurant dining safely? We talk to an epidemiologist about how we should consider the risks of indoor dining during a winter COVID spike.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

About 200 employees at Pfizer’s Connecticut lab helped work on the COVID-19 vaccine that the company said has proved 90 percent effective against the virus in a large-scale trial.

Congressman John Larson spoke outside Hartford Hospital Monday to advocate for nationalizing supply chains for personal protective equipment. 

The re-elected first district representative said he’ll re-introduce legislation on the topic, as national hospitalization numbers continue to rise, and the U.S. total case count hovers around 10 million

The state’s COVID-19 positivity rate jumped again on Tuesday, surpassing 4.6 percent, as public health officials reported 985 new cases.

Coronavirus cases have surged in Connecticut in recent weeks, with positivity rates steadily climbing over the last two weeks of reporting.

There are now more than 380 people hospitalized with the virus. On Tuesday, state officials reported seven new deaths. 

Meanwhile, Connecticut added two more states — Washington and Oregon — to its travel advisory Tuesday, bringing the total to 44. 

Courtesy of Access Health CT

The first week in November marks a busy time as COVID-19 cases climb in Connecticut and the nation faces a contentious presidential election.  

But health advocates want people to remember that it’s also the first week of open enrollment in health insurance plans under the Affordable Care Act. 

The number of COVID-19 infections at an assisted living facility in Canaan continues to grow. The outbreak at Geer Village Senior Community is part of a broader resurgence of coronavirus in long-term care facilities across the state. 

As of Monday, the head of Geer Village Senior Community said there are 34 residents and 13 staff members that tested positive for COVID-19. An additional two staffers are presumed to have the virus.

On Friday, a second resident of Geer died after testing positive in October. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Health care workers stood along Route 195 out in front of Natchaug Hospital in Mansfield Thursday afternoon as they waved signs and used megaphones to demand better workplace protections during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Updated Thursday at 10:55 a.m. ET

Some U.S. hospitals have been hit by coordinated ransomware attacks designed to infect systems for financial gain, federal agencies and a private-sector cybersecurity company warned on Wednesday.

A joint advisory by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, the Department of Health and Human Services and the FBI says there is "credible information of an increased and imminent cybercrime threat" to U.S. hospitals and health care providers.

Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

A worker at Geer Village Senior Community in Canaan wasn’t feeling well while at home. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

When Debra O’Neall gets home from her overnight shift at a nursing home in Danbury, she removes her scrubs and jumps in the shower before she does anything else.

Later, she settles in on the sofa, turns on the news, picks up a sketchbook from the coffee table and begins to draw.  

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

The confirmation of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Amy Coney Barrett may be a threat to women’s reproductive rights and health. The first case she is set to hear on Nov. 10 will determine whether the Affordable Care Act continues on. 

Blurred image of police car lights
WCN 24/7 / Flickr

Connecticut’s capital city is experiencing another public health crisis amidst the pandemic -- an epidemic of gun violence.

There have been more than 50 shootings in Hartford since September.

This hour, we talk about what’s behind this disturbing rise in violence, and how to address it. Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin joins us and we hear from anti-violence advocates.

How should we make sense of a rise in shootings through a public health lens? We hear from an expert who used to lead the CDC’s national injury prevention center.

Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

The timeline on a COVID-19 vaccine is generally unknown, but whether one is approved this year or the next, Wizdom Powell said it won’t help much if Black residents lack confidence in its safety and effectiveness.

“There’s so many stories of Black folks surrendering their bodies to medical institutions and coming out worse after,” said Powell, who is director of the Health Disparities Institute at UConn Health. 

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