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Energy

Ken Schneider.
Nadine Sebai / The Public's Radio

"A Big Fugazi": Why Fishermen Still Can't Get Behind Offshore Wind

In Ken Schneider’s 40-year fishing career, he’s fished for pretty much everything that’s out in the Mid-Atlantic. Now, at 60 years old, Schneider spends most of his time hunting for lobster. On this day, he’s making some extra cash building a boat deck at Leonard’s Wharf in New Bedford before his next fishing trip. He takes his son with him sometimes.

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Connecticut

LA Johnson (Special To Connecticut Public Radio)

Connecticut Students With 'Emotional Disturbances' Face High Rate Of Suspensions

It’s still hard for Keyanna Tucker to talk about what happened to her when she was six. “I was molested,” Tucker said. “I didn’t know how to cope with it … I didn’t know what was going on, but I knew it wasn’t right. So I started becoming a bully.” Tucker, who is now 22, recalled other problems. Her father was incarcerated, which was another layer of stress. And as time went on, her behavior slowly got worse.

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Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut Doctors Working On Syphilis Vaccine

Vanessa de la Torre / Connecticut Public Radio

Leticia Colón de Mejias: Green Eco Warrior

Foxtongue photo via Flickr Creative Commons

What's the impact on the state pension fund when a low-paid legislator moves to a high-paid administration job? We like this piece on "pension spikes" from a policy blog

But maybe it doesn't matter, because we're not really making any serious attempt to fund that whole system.

New Haven Considers Giving Up the Bottle

Feb 8, 2011
Nancy Eve Cohen

Clean Streets Versus Clean Water

Feb 8, 2011
Monica Brady-Myerov

There has been an historic amount of snowfall around the Northeast.  So far in Hartford, at least 80 inches have fallen.

The extreme snowfall has pitted disposing snow against protecting the water.  Many cities in the Northeast have run out of space to put the snow and are asking for permission to dump it in waterways. As part of a collaboration with northeast stations, Monica Brady-Myerov of WBUR reports.

Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra is taking the city's schools superintendent to task for issuing a series of bonuses to district employees. Segarra says he understands the bonuses total about $2.7 million -- a figure that seemed to frustrated the mayor of this cash-strapped city. In a letter to Superintendent Steven Adamowski, Segarra said he wants to know why these bonuses were issued, what criteria was used in a awarding them, and who approved them.

Nancy Eve Cohen

Harriet Jones

We hear all the time that small businesses are having trouble accessing credit. But sometimes it’s hard to picture what that means both for an individual firm, and for the wider economy. To find out more, WNPR’s Harriet Jones visited a construction company that’s currently rehabbing several old homes in Middletown.

No Good Place to Put the Snow

Feb 4, 2011
Flickr Creative Commons, Charles Jeffrey Danoff

Record-setting snowfall, sub-zero temperatures and treacherous travel conditions have meant plenty of missed school days this year.  Educators are worried that lost classroom time may affect preparation for standardized tests. 

State Department of Education spokesman Tom Murphy says he’s seen school closings, late openings and early dismissals in other years, "but this is really beyond what we’ve seen ever.  And it couldn’t happen at a worse time in our high schools, when we have our end of course exams" 

Despite Snow, Spring Will Be Early, Says Groundhog

Feb 3, 2011
Nancy Eve Cohen

After days of shoveling and scraping Connecticut residents may be happy to hear there’s been a prediction for an early spring. It came from Connecticut’s official state groundhog.

The Lutz Children’s Museum in Manchester takes in wild animals that have been injured. Including a female groundhog who bears the weighty title, "Connecticut Chuckles the Seventh". Early this morning she went outside, sniffed the air and looked around, but did not see her shadow, according to Bob Eckerd, the executive director of the museum.

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More From Connecticut Public Radio

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Snapshots Of A Controlled Burn On Connecticut's Coast

Recently, part of Harkness Memorial State Park in Waterford caught fire. But this shoreline blaze wasn’t a disaster. It was actually a carefully-planned “burn” aimed at preserving what’s been called the “last remnant” of eastern prairie in Connecticut.

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Disaster Recovery

The part of the street where Ridge Road meets Lexington Avenue in Danbury was closed after a telephone pole snapped and took down power lines.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Bill Aims To Help Conn. Homeowners With Storm Damage Costs

One year after tornadoes ripped through Connecticut, many residents are still struggling with post-storm cleanup. In response, federal lawmakers announced Monday that they’re reintroducing what they call the DEBRIS Act (Diversifying Emergency Benchmarks for the Recovery of Individuals after Storms).

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Arts

Courtesy: Palestinian Museum

Reflecting On Palestinian Culture Through Music

Classical musicians of Palestinian origin live and perform throughout the world. Palestinian/Japanese soprano Mariam Tamari and Palestinian pianist Fadi Deeb present a recital this weekend in Connecticut as part of a three-city U.S. tour. The program includes a wide range of musical styles, from Puccini to Debussy to original settings of Palestinian poetry.

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Connecticut Public Radio is working with other stations to focus on the role of guns in American life.

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Public Health

Rhoda Baer/National Cancer Institute / Creative Commons

Connecticut Releases School Vaccination Rates, But The Data Is Disputed

The state Department of Public Health has made public the number of unvaccinated children attending every school in the state . But some of the numbers have already been disputed as inaccurate.

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