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Technology

Media Fast: Day One

Aug 3, 2011
Rachel Chapman

WNPR and Your Public Media contributor Heather Brandon has accepted our challenge to complete a media fast. She'll be abstaining from all media Monday, August 1 - Thursday, August 4 and will be interviewed, along with Tom Cooper, author of Fast Media, Media Fast: How to Clear Your Mind and Invigorate Your Life In an Age of Media Overload about her fast on the Thursday, August 4 edition of "Where We Live."  No internet surfing, no television, no video games. This is her diary.

Google's World

Aug 2, 2011
Photo by Robert Scoble (Flickr)

What company became so successful that its name is now used as a verb? If you’re not sure, well, maybe you should Google it.

Google started as a search engine but it has grown to include email, calendars, documents, maps, even mobile operating systems.

Harriet Jones

A tiny Connecticut company that’s making innovative skull implants for trauma victims has just shipped its first product.  Kelyniam says its rapid-response device is different than anything else on the market. As WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports, the company is employing skills and techniques usually associated with the aerospace industry.

In the lobby of Kelyniam Global’s small unit in a Canton business park several plastic skulls sit on glass shelves. The company’s CEO is James Ketner.

Online Civility

Aug 1, 2011
Photo by Basheer Tome (Flickr)

We used to discuss the news around the water cooler, at the barbershop and sometimes at dinner. Now, we can get right online and tell people how we REALLY feel...

Is there anyplace more cringe-worthy than the “comments section” of a news website?

The intentions were good: providing readers with a place to discuss the stories.

But all too frequently there’s name-calling and hateful comments, all disguised by anonymous “handles.”

Do Children Get the Short End of the Stick?

Aug 1, 2011
blakespot via Flickr

WNPR & Your Public Media contributor Heather Brandon has accepted our challenge to complete a media fast. She'll be abstaining from all media Monday, August 1 - Thursday, August 4 and will be interviewed, along with Tom Cooper, author of Fast Media, Media Fast: How to Clear Your Mind and Invigorate Your Life In an Age of Media Overload about her fast on the Thursday, August 4 edition of "Where We Live."  No internet surfing, no television, no video games. This is her diary.

Harriet Jones

Cleaning up contaminated land is a massive problem around the world. Pollutants can threaten human health and hold up redevelopment projects. One young Connecticut company called Verutek has just patented a new approach to environmental remediation. 

John Collins has dealt with environmental pollution throughout his career.

“There are so few good remedial technologies and so much contamination. There’s like, 294,000 contaminated sites in the United States that have not been cleaned up.”

Saying Goodbye to Facebook, Twitter

Jul 29, 2011
Rachel Chapman

WNPR & Your Public Media contributor Heather Brandon has accepted our challenge to complete a media fast. She'll be abstaining from all media Monday, August 1 - Thursday, August 4 and will be interviewed, along with Tom Cooper, author of Fast Media, Media Fast: How to Clear Your Mind and Invigorate Your Life In an Age of Media Overload about her fast on the Thursday, August 4 edition of "Where We Live."  No internet surfing, no television, no video games. This is her diary.

Harriet Jones

Connecticut hopes to grow a significant cluster of high-tech companies in fields such as fuel cells, advanced manufacturing and medical devices. But one of the stumbling blocks can be finding cash to develop new and unproven ideas. WNPR’s Harriet Jones looks at efforts to fill the funding gap for emerging technologies.

Jolinda Lambert is the CEO of a company called Innovatient Solutions that’s just about 18 months old.

James Vaughan/flickr creative commons

Jet Age: The Comet, the 707, and the Race to Shrink the World
by Sam Howe Verhovek

The captivating story of the titans, engineers, and pilots who raced to design a safe and lucrative passenger jet. 

The Book 2.0

Jul 21, 2011
goXunuReviews, Creative Commons

Borders Books reached its height in 2005 with more than 1,200 bookstores around the world. In a few weeks, there will be no more.

Harriet Jones

A lot of effort in recent years has been focused on reducing US dependence on foreign oil. Not so much thought is given to making that oil last longer. One small North Stonington company sends technology around the world that does just that. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

The New Cartography

Jun 27, 2011
Christine Rondeau, Creative Commons

Since the days of great explorers, maps have served a very simple purpose, getting us from point A to point B (without falling off the edge of the earth, of course). 

But with the advent of digital mapping technologies, the form, function and potential of maps has been revolutionized.

Paris Air Show

Connecticut companies both large and small are doing business at the prestigious Paris Air Show this week, the world’s largest gathering of aerospace companies. WNPR’s Harriet Jones reports.

U.S.federal statistics show that 16 to 20-year-olds are more likely to be arrested than involved in car accidents. A Connecticut-based company has created a new smartphone application that provides fast legal advice to people who find themselves in legal emergencies.

The moment when someone has been or is just about to be arrested, is critical, says Chris Miles, a former AIG employee who used to work in insurance and risk management.  "Not only is it time-sensitive, its also a interaction where mistakes matter. You really can’t make an error."

courtesy eGen

Connecticut would like to reinvent itself as the next Silicon Valley. Some economic development experts say our future lies with the state’s small technology companies. If that’s to become a reality, Connecticut’s universities will have to be a key part of the change. A conference today at UConn aims to show the way. 

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