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Paul Manafort 'Brazenly' Broke The Law, Special Counsel Says In Sentencing Memo

Prosecutors for special counsel Robert Mueller say they take no position on what Paul Manafort's prison sentence should be, but say President Trump's former campaign chairman acted in "bold" fashion to commit a multitude of crimes. Manafort is scheduled to be sentenced next month after pleading guilty in a Washington, D.C. court last year to charges of conspiracy against the United States and conspiracy to obstruct justice. In a sentencing memo submitted to the court on Friday but made public...

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A small moment of anger pushed Grammy-winning artist Gary Clark Jr. to create the unapologetic, seething song "This Land."

After long days picking leaves on tea plantations in India's remote northeast, some laborers like to relax with a glass of cheap, strong, locally-brewed liquor. Most can't afford the brand-name stuff.

But Indian authorities say at least 93 people have died and some 200 others are hospitalized after drinking tainted alcohol there in recent days. Some are in critical condition.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

There’s some good news for local brewers in Gov. Ned Lamont’s proposed biennium budget, which would cut the alcohol beverage tax on craft breweries in half.

United Methodist Church leaders are meeting in St. Louis beginning Saturday to decide whether to lift a ban on LGBTQ clergy and same-sex weddings.

The topic has become increasingly contentious in recent years, as more United Methodist clergy have come out as gay. United Methodists are among the last mainline Protestant denominations to address the issue, and some worry it could cause a major rift in the church.

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro announced Saturday that his government had broken diplomatic ties with Colombia after the government there aided opposition activists in seeking to bring humanitarian aid into Venezuela.

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news.

Oakland teachers are the latest to strike

Teachers in Oakland, Calif., went on strike Thursday after the Oakland teachers union rejected a last-minute proposal from the district Wednesday. Teachers in the Oakland Unified School District have been working without a contract since July 2017.

President Trump is nominating Kelly Knight Craft as the new U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. If confirmed by the Senate, Craft, currently U.S. ambassador to Canada, will succeed Nikki Haley, who announced her departure last fall.

A child died from influenza this week, becoming the first pediatric flu death in Connecticut this season.

Officials from the state Department of Public Health announced the child’s death in a statement Friday while stressing the importance of vaccinating children against influenza.

The Diocese of Norwich has released the names of three more men credibly accused of sexually assaulting a minor.

Updated Saturday, Feb. 23 at 2:36 p.m. ET

R&B star R. Kelly was arrested on Friday evening after having been indicted on 10 counts of aggravated criminal sexual abuse in Cook County, Ill. On Saturday afternoon, a judge set bond at $1 million.

A police spokesman confirmed Friday night that Kelly was under arrest and in police custody; Kelly turned himself in at Chicago's 1st District-Central police station.

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Can Feces Save A Species? Boston Has The World's Largest Collection Of Right Whale Poop

The Marine Stress and Ocean Health Lab at the New England Aquarium looks like your typical laboratory. It’s full of humming and whirring machines, beakers and test tubes, digital scales and centrifuges. What sets it apart is the freezer. At negative 80 degrees Celsius, it houses the world’s largest collection of right whale poop. Yes, poop. It sounds gross, but scientists can learn a lot from feces reproductive and metabolic health, stress levels, exposure to infectious disease and biotoxins...

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Fixed Odds: Problem Gambling in America

'Fixed Odds' explores the impact of problem gambling on communities of color and the extent to which states provide money for problem gambling treatment.

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What Are The Secrets Of Connecticut's Bobcats?

Researchers are tracking the wild cats all over the state.

Connecticut Public Radio is working with other stations to focus on the role of guns in American life.

Extra Credit

Arts

Rachael Warten makes handmade soaps, scarves, and ties.
Diane Orson / Connecticut Public Radio

New Space In New Haven For Artisans With Developmental And Social Disabilities

Artisans and staff with Chapel Haven Schleifer Center’s UARTS program have a new storefront in the Westville neighborhood to create and display their weavings, hand-marbled silk scarves, and other items.

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