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Ethics

Jim Wadleigh, former CEO of Access Health CT.
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

After Revolving Door Questions, Former Access Health CEO Resigns From Private Sector Job

The former CEO of the state’s health care exchange has resigned from his new private sector job, just weeks after taking it. Jim Wadleigh now says his move may have contravened state ethics laws.

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Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Voters this November won’t only be deciding on a long list of candidates for elected office. They’ll also decide two ballot questions which, for the first time in a decade, could amend the state’s constitution.

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET

Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was "brutally murdered" as part of a meticulous operation by a team of Saudis, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Tuesday, rejecting Saudi Arabia's claim that the death was accidental. Erdogan called for Saudi Arabia to share facts about the case and said the suspects should be tried in Turkey.

Jim Wadleigh, former CEO of Access Health CT.
Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

The former CEO of the state’s health care exchange has resigned from his new private sector job, just weeks after taking it. Jim Wadleigh now says his move may have contravened state ethics laws.

An explosive device was found at the Westchester County, New York, home of billionaire philanthropist George Soros on Monday afternoon.

In a statement to NPR, the Bedford Police Department said an employee of the house found a suspicious package in the mailbox. They opened it, revealing what "appeared to be an explosive device." The employee placed the package in a nearby wooded area and alerted authorities.

Conn. Gubernatorial Debate Heats Up Around Minimum Wage

15 hours ago
Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor Susan Bysiewicz talks with reporters, joined by AFL-CIO President Lori Pelletier (right, Rep. Robyn Porter of New haven (left) and Connecticut Working Families Party leader Lindsay Farrell (far left)
Keith Phaneuf / CTMirror.org

The race for governor heated up Monday over a squabble about the state’s minimum wage.

Democrat Ned Lamont’s campaign charged that Republican Bob Stefanowski plans to repeal Connecticut’s $10.10 per hour minimum wage — a charge the GOP nominee immediately denied.

Updated 11 a.m. ET Tuesday

The Supreme Court has temporarily shielded Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross from having to sit for questioning under oath in the lawsuits over a controversial citizenship question the Trump administration added to the 2020 census.

U.S. National Security Adviser John Bolton arrived in Moscow this weekend to a murmur of dampened outrage over President Trump's announcement to leave the 1987 arms control treaty that marked the end of the Cold War.

Mikhail Gorbachev, the former Soviet leader who signed the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty with then-President Ronald Reagan, called the decision a "mistake" that didn't originate from a great mind.

As the opioid epidemic has escalated around the nation, colleges and universities have been spared the brunt of it. Opioid addiction and overdoses are more rare on campuses than among young adults in the general population. But schools are not immune to the problem, and they're growing increasingly concerned about how to keep students safe.

States with higher levels of household gun ownership have higher rates of fatal police shootings, according to a study this month from researchers at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Northeastern University.

The study found a 3.6 times higher incident rate for fatal police shootings in the 10 states with the highest firearm availability (population 122 million in the period) versus that in the five states with the lowest firearm availability (population 122 million during the same period).

Updated at 5:45 a.m. ET Monday

A growing crowd of Central American migrants in southern Mexico resumed its advance toward the U.S. border on Sunday. The numbers have overwhelmed Mexican officials' attempts to stop them at the border.

The Associated Press reports that the number of migrants has swelled to about 5,000, but an official in Mexico has put the number as high as 7,000.

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2018 Elections

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What To Know About The Transportation Lockbox Question On Connecticut's Ballot

A referendum regarding money put into the state’s special transportation fund will be on the ballot on Election Day in November.

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Connecticut Public Radio is working with other stations to focus on the role of guns in American life.

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Connecticut Public Radio's coverage of the 2018 elections.

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