Connecticut Public Radio | Media for the curious
WNPR

Thanksgiving

Fouad Dagoum, Kutti Dagoum, Bonnie Bayuk, Azhar Ahmed, and Lames Abdelrahman
Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

Native Dishes From Sudan And New Holiday Traditions in Connecticut

Thanksgiving is a time to celebrate with family and friends and share a meal together. For many U.S. families, that means roast turkey, stuffing, cranberry, and pumpkin pie. But for some refugee families, the holiday can be a time to share native dishes and new holiday traditions.

Read More

The opening of commercial pot shops in Massachusetts is likely to draw people from neighboring states —like Connecticut — where recreational marijuana is not legal. 

Fouad Dagoum, Kutti Dagoum, Bonnie Bayuk, Azhar Ahmed, and Lames Abdelrahman
Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

Thanksgiving is a time to celebrate with family and friends and share a meal together. For many U.S. families, that means roast turkey, stuffing, cranberry, and pumpkin pie. But for some refugee families, the holiday can be a time to share native dishes and new holiday traditions.

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

Thanksgiving is traditionally the busiest travel time of the year - when millions of people hit the roads, skies, waterways, and the rail system. 

A dead sperm whale found in Indonesia had at least 13 pounds of garbage in its stomach, including 115 plastic cups and two sandals, according to a team of researchers including the World Wide Fund For Nature.

"Although we have not been able to deduce the cause of death, the facts that we see are truly awful," Dwi Suprapti, a marine species conservation coordinator at WWF Indonesia, told The Associated Press.

Updated at 4:40 a.m. ET on Wednesday

President Trump has made explicit that the U.S. relationship with Saudi Arabia will be defined by business deals and a shared opposition to Iran — and not the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

"If we abandon Saudi Arabia, it would be a terrible mistake," Trump told reporters outside the White House on Tuesday. "We're with Saudi Arabia. We're staying with Saudi Arabia."

More than 50 people were killed when a suicide bomber targeted a gathering of scholars celebrating a religious holiday in Kabul on Tuesday, Afghan government officials said.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

You can’t buy pot for fun in Connecticut, but provided you don’t bring it back over the border, you can now purchase at two stores in Massachusetts.

Cut Caesar salad off the menu this week: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says a multistate E. coli outbreak is underway, and romaine lettuce is to blame.

Thirty-two people are sick, including 13 who were hospitalized; no deaths have been reported. An additional 18 people were sickened in Canada.

Evidence points toward romaine lettuce as the likely source, but the CDC can't get more specific than that.

Updated at 6:20 p.m. ET

President Trump declared on Tuesday that his administration will remain a "steadfast partner" of Saudi Arabia, despite the CIA's assessment that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman personally approved the killing last month of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

"Maybe he did and maybe he didn't," Trump said of the crown prince's knowledge of the killing.

A little brown bat confirmed to have white-nose syndrome.
USFWS / Progressive Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) / Creative Commons

The fungal disease white-nose syndrome has killed off millions of bats across America. Since it was first identified in 2006, it’s appeared on bats in more than 30 states, including all of New England, Quebec, and the Maritimes.

Now, scientists are trying to learn more about the impact of this devastating disease, by listening to the calls of the bats left behind.

Pages

Get The News

Trouble Keeping Up With News?

Get the WNPR email newsletter daily.

More From Connecticut Public Radio

Archaeologists Discover Evidence Of Connecticut's Earliest English Colony

On the grounds of Wethersfield's Webb-Deane-Stevens Museum, archaeologists have discovered evidence of the oldest English colony in Connecticut.

Read More

Traditions

The Presidential Turkey Pardon's Weird Roots Go Back To The Iran-Contra Scandal

The president is going to pardon a turkey. Full stop. Insert joke. These things write themselves. But seriously, it's happening again Tuesday — the peculiar Washington tradition of a president pardoning a Thanksgiving turkey. "Over the past 10 months, Melania and I have had the pleasure of welcoming many, many special visitors to the great White House," President Trump said during his first turkey-pardoning ceremony last year. "We've hosted dozens of incredible world leaders, members of...

Read More

Health Care

A Search For New Ways To Pay For Drugs That Cost A Mint

Researchers expect that three dozen new drugs will come on the market over the next few years with astronomical prices — some likely topping a million dollars per patient. The drugmaker Novartis has told investors it might be able to charge $4 million to $5 million for one of its potential products, a treatment for a rare disease called spinal muscular atrophy. Hundreds more ultra-expensive therapies are under development. They could drive up the cost of medicine and health insurance for...

Read More

The Beaker

The Mystery Of Wild Horses

What are the secrets of North Dakota's majestic mustangs?

Connecticut Public Radio is working with other stations to focus on the role of guns in American life.

Extra Credit

WNPR Shows

Call in to talk about where we live and who we are. Our show highlights Connecticut's diverse communities -- and we want to hear your stories.
We feature topics that vary widely from day to day. You'll hear a thoughtful, smart, interesting conversation with amazing guests.
Connecticut's best journalists come out of the political trenches every Wednesday for our weekly news roundtable.
Get ideas for easy cooking and healthful living every week.
Our weekly show is about all of New England, America's oldest place, at a time of change.