WNPR

Students and Schools

  

This reporting initiative is made possible by the Nellie Mae Education Foundation — working to reshape public education to better prepare all students for the future.

See additional work from the Journalism and Media Academy's Youth Media project »

Pool Safety Bill On Table In Wake Of School Drownings

Apr 10, 2013
Flickr Creative Commons

A bill to create pool safety standards in swim classes across Connecticut is moving forward for a vote by the General Assembly following two drowning deaths in East Hartford and Manchester schools. 

Flickr Creative Commons, The U.S. Army

If you had to tell the story of 10 years ago today, the story of our invasion of Iraq and its aftermath, what story would you tell? How hard would it be to assemble a narrative?

Today we'll look at that story through the lens of collective (or collected) memory, a fascinating branch of history that looks at the way people and societies assemble and preserve factual narratives.

 We'll also look at one high school history teacher's attempt to teach the Iraq War even as it hovers on the cusp that separates contemporary issues from history.

Eren {Se+Prairie} on Flickr Creative Commons

Good teaching is the single biggest indicator for student success, and while we spend more money to teach our students than in any other country, we achieve at lower levels than our foreign counterparts.

So, what makes for a good teacher, and how do we know it when we see it?

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation asked that question of 3,000 students and their teachers in a recently released study that took 3 years and cost $45 million dollars to complete. 

What they learned is what most kids already know, students are the best judge of what works. 

Local municipalities open their charters for revision at least once every ten years. New Haven is in the midst of a charter revision process, and the issue getting the most attention, is whether the school board should remain appointed by the mayor.

In New Haven, the mayor appoints the entire school board and is also a member. 

J Holt

Teaching business can be a pretty rigorous discipline, and sometimes a bit dry. But Fairfield University’s Dolan School of Business has embraced an unconventional teaching tool - one that involves its professors taking to the stage. WNPR’s J Holt has this report.

In the black box theater at Fairfield University’s Quick Center for the Performing arts, the cast of Glengarry Glen Ross is taking their places backstage as a sold out crowd assembles in the lobby, and after a final check of the lights, 

Alistair Highet “And, I guess that’s it.”  

Hartford, CT - The hotly contested Connecticut senatorial race is in full swing with only two candidates remaining and Election Day fast approaching- Or is it? On the eleventh anniversary of September 11, we headed to the University of Hartford campus to gather students memories about the attacks and opinion’s on the upcoming senatorial election. While students were able to vividly remember where they were 11 years ago today – impressions about the upcoming senate election were much vaguer.

Youth Vote: Senators, Students and Some Perspective in Connecticut

Sep 18, 2012

Hartford, CT - It may be one of the biggest elections this year in CT, but the senatorial race between Linda McMahon and Chris Murphy doesn’t appear to be making large strides within the college/university crowd. As part of the coverage for the 2012 Connecticut Senatorial Race, the CPTV Media Lab Interns went out to the University of Hartford to experience first hand the views of students during the 2012 election year. Most students who were interviewed didn’t have explicit knowledge of the Candidates though there were a few students who rose above the rest with their knowledge.

High Hopes Therapeutic Riding

Sep 4, 2012
Mark Yaworowski

When Kerry Christianson first rode a horse, she needed people on each side of her to make sure she did not fall. Her posture was poor, and she needed to wear a special brace, so someone could hold her. Now, she is able to sit upright in her saddle, and hold her head steady. This is thanks to High Hopes Theraputic Riding in Old Lyme, Connecticut.

Real Life Survival Guide Episode 57

Aug 27, 2012
Cindy Papish Gerber

When the calendar switches from August to September, I can't help but think about the various ways I have felt about fall over the years: nervousness and corduroys, preseason soccer, returning to college, and now, getting the kids OUT OF THE HOUSE!

Senator Who?

Jul 30, 2012

HARTFORD, CT - Some politicians believe that young people, between the ages of 18 and 26, don't care about politics. Senator Grump C. Mudgeon is one of those politicans. He claims that young people don't watch the news, pick up newspapers, or even register to vote.

The CPBN Media Lab went out in search of young people at the University of Hartford and Trinity College. After showing people Grump's message, which urges youth to avoid the polls, we filmed their reactions. "Who is this?" asked Andre Dixon, former UCONN student.

Chion Wolf

As the University of Connecticut gets bigger - with more global aspirations - what does that mean for the state university system?

This fall, Dr. Elsa Núñez starts her seventh year as president of Eastern Connecticut State University. Some view it as UConn’s little sister campus in nearby Willimantic. But Núñez has bigger plans. She wants ECSU to make a name for itself as a first-choice liberal arts school.

The Rise of Women

Jul 13, 2012
UNE Photos

Women outpace men in colleges and graduate school and account for half of the workforce, so why are there still so few women in top jobs?

Because women have more education and career opportunities than ever before, because they’ve entered male-dominated fields like medicine, the military and engineering in numbers only dreamed about by their grandmothers...there’s a case that we’ve reached a kind of “gender equity.”

But women hold only 14% of corporate executive jobs.  Only a third make partner in law firms, and their wait is longer.

Youth Violence

Jul 3, 2012
Chion Wolf

When violence strikes a city – as Hartford was struck last month in a weekend of shootings that left two dead and eight wounded  – you have to ask why, and you have to ask how can we prevent this from happening again?

Especially when the violence involves young people, a city stops and ponders. One of the dead was a 16-year old Windsor High student, shot while attending a Sweet Sixteen birthday party.

Connecticut’s House of Representatives has unanimously passed a wide-ranging education reform bill. Legislators describe the bill as an important step toward improving the state’s public schools and closing Connecticut’s achievement gap.

The chamber erupted in cheers after the 149 to zero vote, giving final legislative approval to a compromise education reform measure. 

Jonathan McNicol photo

Connecticut is going for education reform. We hear from teachers this time about what reforms they think will provide the best outcomes for students.

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