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It's an important monthly cycle for half the world's population, yet even in 2017 many people aren’t comfortable talking about it.

This hour, why is menstruation so taboo, even though it’s a basic part of human biology?

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This hour: the myths and realities of end-of-life treatment in the U.S.

Coming up, we learn about a recent Kaiser Health News investigation and explore the history of hospice in Connecticut.

Do you know someone who has received or is currently undergoing hospice care? How has that experience affected you, your friends, your family? 

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There’s no doubt about it—health care in the U.S. is complicated.  

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Kurt Andersen's new book is Fantasyland: How America Went Haywire. It's a 500-year history "of America jumping the shark." The idea, largely, is that our present post-fact, fake-news moment is... nothing new.

This hour, we look back at the history. We look at our present -- which is to say, we look at our present president: "To describe [Trump] is practically to summarize this book," Andersen says in Fantasyland. And we wonder if there's any way to regain and retain reality in America.

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This hour: IVF -- in vitro fertilization -- has brought the miracle of life to women and families across the U.S.

Those who have undergone the procedure, however, know it does not come without a cost.

Coming up, we weigh the physical, financial, and emotional demands of IVF treatment.

We hear from doctors and patients.

We also consider a recent New York magazine article about PGS -- the test used to identify viable embryos. How accurate is it? We take a closer look. 

If you've ever put in eyedrops, some of them have almost certainly spilled onto your eyelid or cheek.

The good news is the mess doesn't necessarily mean you missed. The bad news is that medicine you wiped off your face is wasted by design — and it's well-known to the drug companies that make the drops.

More than half a million Hoosiers have been diagnosed with diabetes, and many of them rely on insulin to live healthy lives. But patients say the skyrocketing price of the medicine —which more than doubled from 2002 to 2013 — is squeezing them to the point of outrage.

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A potential new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease is being tested on human patients for the first time. The idea, which has close ties to Connecticut, is different to every other approach currently on the market for this still-incurable disease. 

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Sleep. We all need it. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, roughly one in three U.S. adults do not get enough of it.

Coming up, we consider the impact of this and other sleep-related trends with Dr. Meir Kryger. His new book is called The Mystery of Sleep.

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During the 1920’s, some Connecticut women took jobs painting watch dials with radium-laced paint. At the time, they didn’t know it was toxic. As these so-called “Radium Girls” began to die, their stories became part of a rallying cry for industrial regulation.

Jeffrey C. Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael W. Young are the joint winners of the 2017 Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine, winning for their discoveries about how internal clocks and biological rhythms govern human life.

The three Americans won "for their discoveries of molecular mechanisms controlling the circadian rhythm," the Nobel Foundation says.

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Robert Fuller was loading his car with supplies in San Juan, getting ready to leave the battered capital for a trip inland to survey damage to local health facilities, when we caught up with him by phone.

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Pregnancy and childbirth bring on a range of emotions -- from excitement, to exhaustion, to the stress of physical pain.

Few, however, expect these experiences to result in human tragedy -- especially not in the death of a new or soon-to-be mother

This hour: the realities of maternal health and mortality. We check in with a team of doctors and reporters, and we also hear from you.

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The city of Waterbury has filed a lawsuit accusing multiple pharmaceutical companies of causing the opioid addiction and overdose crisis. 

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Pregnancy and childbirth bring on a range of emotions -- from excitement, to exhaustion, to the stress of physical pain.

Few, however, expect these experiences to result in human tragedy -- especially not in the death of a new or soon-to-be mother

This hour: the realities of maternal health and mortality. We check in with a team of doctors and reporters, and we also hear from you.

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