WNPR

Massachusetts

MGM Resorts has announced a gambling partnership with the NBA and WNBA. But don't look for betting on basketball at MGM’s new Springfield casino anytime soon.

MGM officials told Massachusetts gambling regulators Thursday that the company is on pace to hire 3,000 employees before it opens its Springfield casino next month. But so far, MGM is coming up short on some hiring goals.

Apex Photo Company / Wikimedia Commons

During his remarkable career with the Boston Red Sox, Ted Williams earned many nicknames: The Kid, The Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame... but the only nickname that he ever wanted was "the greatest hitter who ever lived."

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

This hour, we learn about a new online series about "extreme inequality" in Connecticut.

We also look at trends in white shark activity off the coast of Cape Cod.

But first, an update on hurricane-ravaged Puerto Rico. How well-equipped are the island and its residents to face a possible next storm?

With more empty storefronts than full ones, the 30-year-old Berkshire Mall in Lanesborough, Massachusetts, has seen better days. But near Spencer Gifts and a now-shuttered Hollister, something rather unexpected is alive and well: baseball.

KatarzynaBialasiewicz/iStock / Thinkstock

This hour, we give an overview of the NAACP's newly-announced prison gerrymandering lawsuit against Connecticut. Why did the organization choose to target our state? And why now?

Plus, a breakdown of the U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling in the case of Janus v. AFSCME. What does the justices’ decision mean for the future of Connecticut’s public-sector unions?

But first, the timeline for legal recreational marijuana sales in Massachusetts remains a bit... hazy. We get the latest on the Bay State’s budding industry and find out what lies ahead for pot retailers. 

Leonard Bernstein seated at piano, making annotations to a musical score.
Al Ravenna / New York World-Telegram & Sun Collection (Public Domain)

Leonard Bernstein’s ghost has hung discreetly around the grounds of Tanglewood for the past 28 years, ever since the maestro died in the fall of 1990.

In a sudden reversal, Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker's administration canceled its plan to send National Guard members and equipment to the southwestern U.S. border, citing the federal government's "inhumane" practice of separating undocumented children from their families.

Expanded train service between Springfield, Hartford and New Haven is set to begin in the coming days.

The Massachusetts Cannabis Control Commission won't issue the first marijuana business license until the end of next week at the earliest, and regulators already have more than 50 applications waiting for their consideration.

Recent news reports about the U.S. government losing track of nearly 1,500 immigrant children in its care has prompted outrage and confusion. These are children who came here as unaccompanied minors and were placed with sponsors. Their sponsors are often parents or close relatives already living in the country.

What happens when an immigrant facing deportation seeks sanctuary in a church, but then needs to leave to get surgery? That happened in western Massachusetts this week. 

The first two pieces up for auction from the Berkshire Museum's art collection fetched more than $1.4 million at auction Monday night in New York.

The great American patriot and Bostonian Paul Revere died 200 years ago on May 10, 1818. He's often remembered as one of the infamous "midnight riders" who rode into Concord, Massachusetts, to warn residents about a planned British attack.

In Boston federal court, mobster Stephen “The Rifleman” Flemmi isn’t the one currently on trial. But listening Wednesday to the defense teams’ opening arguments in the murder trial of his former partner and the partner’s associate, it was hard to tell.

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