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hospitals

Medicare To Penalize 27 Hospitals For High Readmissions

12 hours ago
Waterbury Rep-Am via C-HIT.org

Most Connecticut hospitals will lose a portion of their Medicare reimbursement payments over the next year as penalties for having high rates of patients being readmitted, new data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) show.

Consumers Feel Sticker Shock As Out-Of-Pocket Health Care Costs Rise

Oct 2, 2018
Lauren Goldstein (left) and her wife, Joan Goldstein, are fighting their insurance company's refusal to pay a $3,094 ER bill.
Carl Jordan Castro / C-HIT

In February, Joan Goldstein of Monroe received a panicked call for help from her wife, Lauren Goldstein. Joan found Lauren rolled up like a ball on the floor in her office bathroom. “I have never seen her sick in 15 years,” Joan said.

DigiDreamGrafix.com / Creative Commons

Amid reports of consolidations and staffing crises, we ask: What is the future of the U.S. hospital industry? A team of experts joins us as we weigh this question and consider its implications for Connecticut. 

Later, we discuss the role of crowdfunding platforms in helping alleviate the burden of medical expenses. Have you ever turned to GoFundMe or a similar site to finance the cost of treatment? We want to hear from you. 

A consumer advocacy organization is asking federal health officials Tuesday to halt a large medical study being conducted at major universities nationwide.

Public Citizen says that the study, involving treatment for sepsis, puts patients at risk and will at best produce confusing results.

Editor's note: Shortly after this story by Kaiser Health News and NPR was published and broadcast on Monday, St. David's said it was now willing to accept $782.29 to resolve the $108,951 balance because Drew Calver qualifies for its "financial assistance discount." In a statement, the hospital said this offer was contingent on Calver submitting his application for a discount based on his household finances. Calver disputed that he owes any additional money to St. David's and said this situation should have been resolved long before now.

Connecticut Network

Lawmakers, immigration advocates and doctors are urging Immigration and Custom Enforcement Officials to stop the deportation of New London resident Julian Rodriguez. Rodriguez's 14 year-old son Santi has a rare genetic condition called Chronic Granulomatous Disease, or CGD, which requires regular treatment at Connecticut Children's Medical Center.

Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal calls this deportation case unique because Santi and his mother are participants in a research study at the National Institutes of Health that could lead to a cure for CGD.

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff / Creative Commons

U.S. President Donald Trump signed an executive order Wednesday halting the at-the-border separation of immigrant children and families. Coming up, we wade through the details of the decision and consider its significance moving forward. 

Later, we talk about chronic pain and its impact on young children. We hear from a Connecticut mother whose son was diagnosed with amplified musculoskeletal pain syndrome (AMPS) and learn about the out-of-state program that treated him.

Sickle Cell Patients Suffer As Disparities In Care And Research Persist

Jun 6, 2018
Jeremy Brown, 9, sits with his mother Tangi Small in their Bridgeport apartment.
Derek Torrellas / C-HIT

When 9-year-old Jeremy Brown is in pain, it feels like he is being stabbed, while the pain experienced by Deborah Oliver, 40, is like a hundred simultaneous charley horses.

Ed Uthman / Creative Commons

In the U.S., an estimated 100,000 Americans live with sickle cell disease, or SCD.

Yet, despite its impact, the disease and its patients remain largely out of the public eye.

This hour, C-HIT reporter Peggy McCarthy helps us understand why. We discuss the realities of SCD awareness and hear from a New Haven resident living with the disease.

Plus: inside U.S. drug courts.

What approach do these programs take in addressing the nation’s opioid crisis? And are they accessible here in Connecticut? We find out. 

Stamford Hospital

Connecticut consumers were billed for more than $1 billion in facility fees for outpatient services in 2015 and 2016, documents filed with the state Office of Health Care Access (OHCA) show.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In light of mismanaged abuse allegations involving two former staffers, U.S. Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty announced Monday she will not seek re-election in November.

This hour, we discuss the significance of Esty's decision -- including what it means for Connecticut's Fifth Congressional District race this year.

Plus: With former VA Secretary David Shulkin out, what lies head for U.S. Veterans Affairs? Is the federal agency on track to become privatized? We find out.

And finally: We sit down with a local Army veteran who recently received a discharge upgrade. Could his story help other Connecticut veterans with less than honorable discharges? 

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

So far this winter, more than 60 people have died in Connecticut of the flu. In many of those cases, the actual cause of death is respiratory failure -- the lungs stop working.

The American Red Cross has raised the alert on its blood supply to "critical" -- the last step before "emergency."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: following reports of abuse by staff at Connecticut’s maximum-security psychiatric unit -- news of an order separating Whiting Forensic from Connecticut Valley Hospital. 

Coming up, we discuss the significance of the split -- including what it means for the safety and oversight of patients.

Norwalk Hospital

Norwalk Hospital says its cancer treatment services have benefitted from a new partnership with New York’s Memorial Sloan Kettering. 

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