Affordable Care Act | Connecticut Public Radio
WNPR

Affordable Care Act

Connecticut, like other states, launched an online health exchange -- Access Health CT -- where residents can shop for and purchase health insurance. There could be new opportunities for the unemployed or uninsured to receive health insurance. Here, we gather our coverage of changes under the new federal law.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The U.S Senate recently rejected a number of Republican plans to repeal, replace, or just overhaul the Affordable Care Act. But the health care debate is far from settled.

McCain: "We're Getting Nothing Done!"

Jul 26, 2017
Medill DC / Creative Commons

Republicans in Washington finally got closer to the goal they’ve had for about seven years - the repeal and replacement of Obamacare. Well, at least the repeal part.

The Affordable Care Act is not "exploding" or "imploding," as President Trump likes to claim. But Trump does hold several keys to sabotaging the insurance marketplaces, should he so choose — one of which his administration is reportedly weighing using.

Alex Proimos/flickr creative commons

Now that the Senate Republican health care bill has collapsed, the next step may be to vote on an outright repeal -- though that plan also faces political hurdles. But were the repeal to happen, it could have serious consequences for state residents.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal said Democrats remain implacably opposed to the Republicans’ latest version of health care reform. A rewritten bill was released Thursday, in an effort to bring on board wavering senators from both conservative and moderate wings of the Republican party. 

The Affordable Care Act isn't perfect. Even proponents of the law would agree with that.

In many parts of the country, there is only one insurer in the individual markets — and in a few, there are zero. Premiums have spiked, sending some people on the insurance exchanges hunting for new plans.

When Senate Republican leaders delayed the vote on their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., was quick to not declare victory.

"We're not resting on any laurels, nor do we feel any sense yet of accomplishment," Schumer said at his weekly press conference, shortly after the surprise GOP decision to punt on a vote. "Other than we are making progress, because the American people are listening to our arguments."

Connor Tarter / Creative Commons

Supporters of the Senate health care reform bill have been few and far between outside of the Republican party. But there's one important industry in Connecticut that is cheerleading for the legislation: medical device companies.

The Senate vote on the health care bill has been pushed back, but it still has a lot of people in the nursing home industry worried. About two-thirds of nursing home residents are paid for by Medicaid. And the Congressional Budget Office found that the Senate health care bill would cut Medicaid by more than $770 billion over the next decade.

sudok1/iStock / Thinkstock

Connecticut estimates as many as 230,000 of its residents on Medicaid could lose insurance coverage in the next ten years if the Senate Republicans' health bill is passed, and the state will have to shoulder an additional $3 billion in cost.

Updated at 1:35 p.m. ET

Americans broadly disapprove of the Senate GOP's health care bill, and they're unhappy with how Republicans are handling the efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

Updated 3:30 p.m. ET

With their health care bill facing a perilous path, Senate Republican leaders have decided to push off a vote until after Congress returns from next week's July Fourth recess, GOP aides confirm to NPR's Susan Davis.

Jeff Slinker flickr.com/photos/jeffslinker/33740462303 / Creative Commons

Connecticut's two Democratic U.S. Senators have both urged Republicans to scrap their contentious health care reform bill, and to work in a bipartisan way to fix the Affordable Care Act.

Slawomir Fajer/iStock / Thinkstock

Connecticut's Medicaid program will be in trouble if the Senate's health care bill becomes law. And health policy experts say people with private insurance are also likely to feel the ramifications.

Updated at 6 p.m. ET June 23

Nevada Sen. Dean Heller on Friday became the latest GOP lawmaker to voice concerns about the Senate health care bill — a development that further complicates Republican efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

"I cannot support a piece of legislation that takes away insurance from tens of millions of Americans and hundreds of thousands of Nevadans," Heller said at a news conference back in Nevada.

Updated at 2:32 p.m. ET

Senate Republicans unveiled their long-awaited health care overhaul proposal on Thursday. The Senate bill, called the "Better Care Reconciliation Act," would repeal major parts of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. The broad outlines of it look a lot like the House bill, the American Health Care Act, which was passed in May.

For the hundreds of rural U.S. hospitals struggling to stay in business, health policy decisions made in Washington, D.C., this summer could make survival a lot tougher.

Soaring prices, cuts in coverage, defunding women’s health care, and a worsening of opioid crisis - those are some of the effects that Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal is predicting if Republicans are able to push through their health care legislation. 

Access Health CT

The Secretary of Health and Human Services said new data showing people dropping out of coverage under the Affordable Care Act is proof government should step back from health care. But the head of Connecticut’s health care exchange begged to differ. 

Gubcio / iStock / Thinkstock

Health care providers are among those waiting nervously for the U.S. Senate to reveal just how it wants to reform health care. The impact could be greatest on those providers who serve low income populations.

Markus Spiske / Creative Commons

Lawmakers continue to debate health care policy in Washington, and millions wonder if they’ll be insured in the future.

This hour, we consider the impact here at home.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

U.S. Senate Democrats blasted the House GOP health care bill on Wednesday following release of the Congressional Budget Office’s report. 

Gubcio / iStock / Thinkstock

There's been a lot of focus lately on how revisions to federal health insurance laws may affect people on state exchanges like the one in Connecticut. But in fact, repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act won’t just alter the landscape for consumers on the exchanges -- it’s certain to have a big impact on employer plans too. 

Derek Torrellas / C-HIT

Federally Qualified Community Health Centers (FQHCs) in Connecticut have expanded services, upped their staffing, and renovated their facilities mostly due to increased revenue streams from the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Back in January, Republicans boasted they would deliver a "repeal and replace" bill for the Affordable Care Act to President Donald Trump's desk by the end of the month.

In the interim, that bravado has faded as their efforts stalled and they found out how complicated undoing a major law can be. With summer just around the corner, and most of official Washington swept up in scandals surrounding Trump, the health overhaul delays are starting to back up the rest of the 2018 agenda.

Screenshot / C-Span

Connecticut Democratic Senator Chris Murphy is calling out Republicans for the secrecy surrounding the crafting of legislation reforming health care. And he condemned the Trump administration for what he said is an effort to sabotage the Affordable Care Act.

The Senate is negotiating its own legislation to repeal and replace much of the Affordable Care Act in secret talks with senators hand-picked by party leaders and with no plans for committee hearings to publicly vet the bill.

"I am encouraged by what we are seeing in the Senate. We're seeing senators leading," said Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, one of the 13 Republicans involved in the private talks. "We're seeing senators working together in good faith. We're not seeing senators throwing rocks at each other, either in private or in the press."

vichie81/iStock / Thinkstock

The two health insurers who currently offer plans on the state's health care exchange say they intend to return in 2018, but both have requested hefty rate increases. The cost of health care generally looks set to rise in Connecticut, as the Department of Insurance gets to work to review insurers rate requests.

Pages