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youth

Here's a stark fact: Most American children spend more time consuming electronic media than they do in school.

According to Common Sense Media, tweens log 4 1/2 hours of screen time a day, seven days a week, 52 weeks a year. For teens, it's even higher: nearly seven hours a day. And that doesn't include time spent using devices for school or in school.

Rennett Stowe / Flickr Creative Commons

Young people coming out of college today have a strong desire to do good in the world, but it’s not easy to find jobs with a social purpose. Instead, many are starting their own businesses, combining an entrepreneurial spirit with a social mission.

Connecticut to Open Prison for Younger Adult Inmates

Dec 17, 2015
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A prison that will exclusively house and deal with the issues of inmates between the ages of 18 and 25 is being planned in Connecticut, said the state's correction commissioner.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy said he thinks the Connecticut Juvenile Training School should close by July 1, 2018. 

John Bunting / Flickr Creative Commons

In Connecticut, youth unemployment rates are at historic highs, with teenagers being disproportionately affected. This hour, we take a closer look at some of the latest trends and find out what’s being done to help young people find jobs. 

In 2008, one voting bloc in particular made a huge difference in the presidential election: young people. Young voters were a crucial part of the coalition that propelled President Obama to victory then.

But what about now? What issues matter to young voters this time around — and which candidates are doing the best job so far of speaking to those concerns?

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut has received national attention for juvenile justice reforms, like its efforts to reduce the number of kids in the system. But advocates say a black eye remains.

For years, critics of the Connecticut Juvenile Training School have called on lawmakers to close the facility for delinquent boys, saying youth -- especially with a history of trauma -- aren't being helped. 

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Governor Dannel Malloy is encouraging the state to consider raising the age at which criminal offenders can be treated as juveniles.

Flazingo Photos flazingo.com / Creative Commons

Unemployment among teenagers and young people in Connecticut stands at historic highs. New research suggests that those who suffer periods of unemployment early in their careers pay a penalty in terms of lowered earnings decades into their careers.

Is Connecticut Suffering from a Youth Jobs Crisis?

Oct 19, 2015
Jon Bunting / Creative Commons

In Connecticut, youth unemployment rates are at historic highs, with teenagers being disproportionately affected. This hour, we take a closer look at some of the latest trends and find out what’s being done to help young people find jobs. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

There's a debate over whether college should prepare kids with specific skills that will prepare them for jobs, or give them a wide-ranging but more general liberal arts education. 

The U.S. Supreme Court hears arguments Tuesday in a case that could determine the fate of more than 2,000 convicted juvenile murderers.

In 2012, the high court struck down as unconstitutional state laws that mandated an automatic sentence of life without any possibility of parole in these cases. The question now is whether that decision applies retroactively.

Mystic Aquarium

Mystic Aquarium is launching a national program to reach out to at-risk youth, and it's the result of the biggest federal grant the non-profit has ever received.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

This week, state lawmakers on the Juvenile Justice Policy and Oversight Committee will meet again to discuss child welfare issues in Connecticut. One of the questions before them is whether the state should continue operating its locked facilities for juveniles in Middletown. 

I'm a member of Generation Y, or the millennial generation. People like me were born in the '80s and early '90s. But I don't like to broadcast that fact. Millennials tend to get a bad rap.

Journalists and commentators love ragging on us. They say we're ill-prepared to deal with life's challenges. And that, as a result, we have higher rates of mental health issues like depression and anxiety.

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