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Yale University

Héctor Valdez / Bou Group

There is still time left to sign-up for this weekend’s Latino and Iberian Film Festival, at Yale.

The festival features films online from countries including Chile, Cuba and the Dominican Republic.

Sanofi Pasteur / Creative Commons

The Center on Climate Change and Health at the Yale School of Public Health has just released a report on climate change and health in Connecticut. It comes to some troubling conclusions and makes urgent calls to action. One of the authors of that report is Laura Bozzi, Ph.D. She outlined the report’s findings on Connecticut Public Radio’s All Things Considered.

Yale University
Pixabay

The U.S. Justice Department is suing Yale University, claiming it discriminated against Asian and white students in its college admissions process. The lawsuit, filed Oct. 8, accuses Yale of violating federal civil rights laws by making admissions decisions based on a candidate’s race. 

Pixabay

This hour, it’s our Fall Pandemic Book Club - Connecticut Only Edition! The Connecticut Center for the Book joins us to discuss this year’s Connecticut Book Awards Finalists, and some of those finalists join us for the hour.

Coming up, our guests will tell us what they are reading, and what inspired their work. 

Tyler Russell / Connecticut Public

This story has been updated.

Rev. Elvin Clayton has been the pastor at Walter’s Memorial African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in Bridgeport for the past six years.

And in the COVID-19 era, Sunday mornings look a little different -- Clayton speaks at the pulpit from behind glass partitions, keeps services to an hour and broadcasts it all live on Facebook. 

“We’ve had great success thus far with it,” he said. 

Alexei Navalny at a campaign stop when he ran for mayor of Moscow in 2013.
ermakov / Flickr Creative Commons

Alexei Navalny, a Russian opposition leader with ties to Yale University, was poisoned, according to the German hospital where he is being treated. Navalny remains in a medically induced coma. The 44-year-old is known for his anti-corruption investigations against Russian state corporations and senior officials, and he participated in Russia’s 2018 presidential election.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public

A viral video of UConn students at a recent campus dorm party brought a swift rebuke from the university. But both the party itself and the school’s official response are raising more questions about whether students should be back at school.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

The pandemic is raising questions about what’s best for children as they head into a new school year, as many schools continue to finalize plans for this fall and parents make individual decisions for their families.

Megan Goslin, a clinical psychologist and research scientist at Yale’s Child Study Center, said it’s a difficult time for everyone. 

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

The U.S. Department of Justice has ruled that Yale University illegally discriminates against Asian American and white applicants, in violation of federal civil rights law. For its part, Yale calls the allegation “meritless” and “hasty.” The case is similar to one brought against Harvard last year. That case was rejected by a federal judge. 

Yale University
Pixabay

The Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division says Black and Latinx students with similar academic qualifications are being admitted to Yale at higher rates than white and Asian American students, pointing to discrimination and a violation of the Civil Rights Act. 

Lawyer David Hinojosa said the evidence leading to that conclusion is -- in his words -- “almost laughable.”

Feds Accuse Yale Of Racial Discrimination In Admissions

Aug 13, 2020
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A Justice Department investigation has found Yale University is illegally discriminating against Asian American and white applicants, in violation of federal civil rights law, officials said Thursday. Yale denied the allegation, calling it “meritless” and “hasty.” 

Courtesy: Beinecke Library

Yale historian David Blight says when he first saw a collection of family scrapbooks of the great abolitionist Frederick Douglass, he was astonished.

Blight had been fascinated by Frederick Douglass all of his life. He’d written a book and edited autobiographies about the escaped slave who became the greatest orator of his day. But the scrapbooks offered new insights into Douglass’ life and eventually inspired Blight’s 2018 Pulitzer Prize-winning biography, Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom.  

Admissions Quest

College campuses across the country are preparing to reopen in the fall. But with the potential for a second wave of coronavirus infections, students and staff are being asked to be flexible. This hour, we’re speaking with students, faculty and leaders throughout the Connecticut State Colleges & Universities system on what it will take to reopen campus in the fall. 

Yale School of Music

The Yale School of Music is implementing a series of initiatives in an effort to address issues of racism and diversity at the school and beyond.

AP Photo/Eric Gay

The NBA could get an assist from Yale University in monitoring the spread of COVID-19 when its season resumes.

Yale’s School of Public Health has announced that select NBA players, coaches and staff will take part in the university’s efforts to determine whether saliva testing for COVID-19 is effective. 

Courtesy: Cristian Padilla Romero

Thousands of DACA recipients in Connecticut are breathing a sigh of relief after learning the U.S. Supreme Court blocked efforts by the Trump administration to end the program that protects them from deportation and allows them to work and study in the U.S. 

Yale Repertory Theater
Yale Repertory Theater

The Yale School of Drama and Yale Repertory Theatre will skip the entire 2020-21 season in response to COVID-19.

In a press release, the school says the decision was made due to the “incompatibility of theatrical production with the best public health practices in response to COVID-19.”

COVID-19 testing
Joe Amon / Connecticut Public/NENC

Every Thursday, a researcher from Yale University picks up a cooler from the East Shore Water Pollution Abatement Facility in New Haven.

In that cooler is a week’s worth of samples from the sewer system that experts call “sludge,” or the solid waste that is left over after treating wastewater. It can contain a mixture of chemicals, metals and remnants of human waste that is flushed down the toilet. 

Photograph by Stephen West, originally published in Yale Alumni Magazine. / Manuscripts and Archives, Yale University Library

On May 1, 1970, tens of thousands of protesters gathered on the New Haven Green and the campus of Yale University. They came in support of Black Panther Party leaders Bobby Seale and Ericka Huggins, who were on trial in New Haven for the murder of a fellow Black Panther, even though several other Panthers had already pleaded guilty to the murder.

Courtesy: Yale School of Public Health

On the same day the state partially reopened, Gov. Ned Lamont disbanded the Reopen Connecticut Advisory Group, the task force that had been charged with coming up with a plan to guide the state into a safe, methodical reopening. One of the co-chairs of that group was Dr. Albert Ko of the Yale School of Public Health.

Vancouver Symphony Orchestra
Vancouver Symphony Orchestra

Virtual commencement celebrations began over the weekend for the Yale University class of 2020. Among those graduating is Henry Shapard. The 21-year-old was recently appointed principal cellist of the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra in Canada. That makes him one of the youngest principal cellists of a major orchestra in North America. 

Kenneth C. Zirkel

As the school year winds down for students, universities and colleges across the state are starting to make a plan for the fall semester. This hour, we’re talking to college faculty and students about what their online learning experience has been like so far, and what their hopes are for the next academic year. How are universities preparing for an outbreak on campus? College isn’t just academics; what will collegiate sports and student organizations look like in the 20-21 academic year? 

We want to hear from you. Are you a student or a faculty member at a Connecticut college or university ? How will your school hold classes during the next academic year? 

Dr. Steven Marans
Courtesy: Yale School of Medicine

The coronavirus has swiftly led to dramatic changes in our daily lives. And that, in turn, has meant new levels of stress for many people.

Unlike other singular traumatic events, the pandemic is ongoing. And as Connecticut begins to reopen its economy, people will have to find ways to continually adapt to unpredictable and changing conditions.

CDC/ Alissa Eckert, MS; Dan Higgins, MAM / Wikimedia Commons

COVID-19 has dominated our lives, but how much do you actually know about the virus that causes this disease?

This hour, we talk with NY Times columnist and writer, Carl Zimmer about the science behind the coronavirus. We learn about how viruses work and how they’re different from other disease-causing germs like bacteria.

Yale Promises 300 Beds For First Responders - After Mayor's Public Shaming

Mar 29, 2020
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Yale University President Peter Salovey announced Saturday that the university will make available 300 beds to house “first responders and hospital personnel,” one day after Mayor Justin Elicker publicly lambasted the university for turning down his request to help house local firefighters and police officers during the Covid-19 pandemic.

 Yale University
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

Universities across the state that have shifted their semesters completely online due to the coronavirus pandemic are working to figure out whether they’ll provide refunds to students who’ve paid for expenses like on-campus housing and meal plans. 

 The Yale campus is quiet on March 11, 2020, as the school is on spring break. The university plans to shift classes online after the break ends to curb the spread of COVID-19.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

As college campuses across the country grapple with potential outbreaks of the coronavirus, Yale University has told students to not come back after spring break -- but that decision was made after spring break started, leaving many students in limbo.

Updated at 4:37p.m. EST.

The U.S. Department of Education says it is opening an investigation into Yale and Harvard universities for failing to disclose hundreds of millions of dollars in gifts and contracts from foreign donors.

The two Ivy League schools have been singled out in a federal crackdown on institutions of higher learning for allegedly not reporting foreign donations of more than $250,000, as required by law under Section 117 of the Higher Education Act.

Petr David Josek / AP Photo

Two people in Connecticut are being monitored for signs of the novel coronavirus, an infectious disease that has spread in China and is now appearing as isolated cases in other countries, including the United States.

A student at Wesleyan University and another person in New Haven County are under observation, according to Gov. Ned Lamont’s office. Health officials said the Wesleyan student tested negative for the disease, but both people have tested positive for the flu. 

Nestled in the Irving S. Gilmore Music Library at Yale University is an audio and video collection featuring many of the major musical figures of our time. 

The Oral History of American Music includes interviews with a wide range of musical figures, from Charles Ives to Laurie Anderson.

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