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Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public

A national shortage of personal protective equipment has left states and individual providers scrambling to find new supplies as COVID-19 continues to spread.

Meanwhile, Connecticut health care workers are coming into direct contact with infected patients, and not just at the hospitals. Nurses and home health aides said rationing and reusing respirator masks, gloves, gowns and other equipment has been distressing. 

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

On Thursday, the state Department of Transportation announced immediate changes to public bus operations.

Passengers will now board from the rear, some buses will have new impermeable barriers to protect drivers, and the DOT is advising riders to use public transit only for essential travel. 

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What’s it like being a dad in 2020? On the next Where We Live, we’ll talk about social expectations for fathers as caregivers, and the impact an involved father has on the entire family, emotionally and financially. Are you a father? We want to hear from you.

U.S. Army

The Lamont administration says working families across the state with low to moderate incomes are beginning to see the impact of a $14 million federal investment in their child care needs. Care 4 Kids, a state and federally funded subsidy program, is using the federal money to increase how much families receive as reimbursement for infant and toddler care.

As The Workforce Ages, Lawmakers Revisit Age Discrimination

Jan 16, 2020
Mark Pazniokas / CT Mirror

With one in four workers now aged 55 and older, Connecticut lawmakers of both parties are rallying around a relatively modest bill aimed at age-discrimination: a prohibition on employers requiring prospective employees to list their age, birth date, or graduation year on an application.

Ublester Rodriguez could not have anticipated that his life would be profoundly changed by kitchen and bathroom countertops.

He says that he grew up poor, in a small Mexican town, and came to the United States when he was 14. He spoke no English, but he immediately got a job.

"In the beginning I was working in a Chinese restaurant, from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. It was all day, so I never had time to go to school," he recalls. "I was a dishwasher."

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

States that allow residents to carry a concealed firearm generally see more workplace homicides committed with guns, according to a new study from Eastern Connecticut State University.

Researchers analyzed 25 states that adopted the legislation between 1992 and 2017, and those states saw an average increase of 24% in the rates of workplace homicides committed with a firearm after the laws took effect. 

Want To Read Ned Lamont’s Playbook? Start Here.

Oct 29, 2019
Courtesy: Governor's Office

Gov. Ned Lamont engaged in two of his favorite pastimes Tuesday: Drawing boldface corporate CEOs, academics and philanthropists into public-private partnerships, and tilting at the silos he believes prevent government agencies from working efficiently in common cause.

Dan Taylr / Flickr Creative Commons

Predictions of a paperless future go back to the 1800s. Yet, despite a dizzying array of technological alternatives to paper, those prediction have not come true.

Scott Leighton / Creative Commons

Hearst Connecticut Media has published a series of reports on data that shows workplace sexual harassment and abuse remain a serious problem across all industries in the state.

Wonderlane / Creative Commons

When Kyle Zimmer started working in the construction industry 40 years ago, he said health and safety standards focused on reducing injuries and fatalities from electrical hazards, falls and a lack of protective gear.  

But today, he said the focus needs to be on addiction, suicide prevention and behavioral health.

Lamont Offers Middle Ground On Restaurant Wage Fight

Sep 24, 2019
Chion Wolf / WNPR

Gov. Ned Lamont has asked legislative leaders to return in special session to vote on a revised version of a restaurant tip-credit bill he vetoed in July, suggesting that talks with unions, business owners and other stakeholders have produced the framework of a consensus.

Lamont, who vetoed a bill that would have stripped restaurant workers of the right to pursue claims of unpaid wages in certain circumstances, is proposing instead to limit damages they could collect from restaurants that relied on inaccurate advice from the Department of Labor in calculating tip-credit wages.

Gov. Ned Lamont delivered his first budget address to the legislature on February 20, 2019.
Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Gov. Ned Lamont is out of the office.

“He’s been gone since Friday,” Max Reiss, his spokesman, said on Sunday. “His family takes a summer trip to Maine. Some years it’s been as long as a month that they go up there. This year he’s taking two weeks.”

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Lisa Kwesell started getting emails and notices mailed to her home last year about her employer’s new wellness program, which was marketed as voluntary and an opportunity to help workers manage or improve their health.

She’d worked for Yale University as a part-time unionized employee for 14 years, and this was the first time she was being offered the opportunity to join a wellness program.

Yalines Herrera, 15, participated in the Summer Youth Employment Program last year, and is again participating this year.
David DesRoches / Connecticut Public Radio

Nearly 200 Hartford students will be spending the rest of their summer working, thanks to a paid internship program funded by the state and several nonprofits.

Yalines Herrera, 15, participated in the Summer Youth Employment Program last year. She said if she wasn't getting a job this summer, she’d probably spend her summer at home.

Jeffrey Smith / Flickr Creative Commons

This hour, we take a deep dive into the realities of modern-day motherhood. We talk with a sociologist who spent years in the field interviewing working moms. We also get a local perspective, and we want to hear from you. 

Amherst2005 / CreativeCommons.org

The idea of what a college education should be has changed over the years. This hour: what’s the value of a liberal arts degree in the twenty-first century?

We hear why tech giant Infosys has teamed up with Trinity College in Hartford to train and recruit new hires. Later, we learn how some colleges are bringing together the best parts of a liberal arts program with a focus on the skills needed in today’s workforce.    

By Amherst2005 (www.creativecommons.org)

The idea of what a college education should be has changed over the years. This hour: what’s the value of a liberal arts degree in the twenty-first century?

We hear why tech giant Infosys has teamed up with Trinity College in Hartford to train and recruit new hires. Later, we learn how some colleges are bringing together the best parts of a liberal arts program with a focus on the skills needed in today’s workforce.    

U.S. Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta led a roundtable discussion on the Eastern Connecticut Manufacturing Pipeline Initiative in Montville on Tuesday, April 16. The pipeline is funded by Acosta's department through a local board.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The United States Department of Labor Secretary was in Connecticut on Tuesday, April 16 to see for himself efforts to reskill the state’s manufacturing workforce.

Emily Wescott stocks the shelves at Noel's Market in Colchester. Wescott was called in Monday April 15, 2019 to deal with an increase in shoppers that her manager says directly correlates to the Stop & Shop union strike.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

With one local grocery chain dealing with a union strike, other stores are enjoying a bit of a boost as customers go grocery shopping somewhere else.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Grocery chain Stop & Shop said on Friday, April 12 that a majority of its Connecticut stores are still open even though union workers have gone on strike.

Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Workers clustered together at the two entrances to the Stop & Shop store in East Hartford, holding signs in the air and chanting, "Better contract, better lives. Better contract, better lives!"

The store's employees were among unionized workers at Stop & Shop stores across Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island who walked off the job Thursday, after weeks of tense contract negotiations with the supermarket chain that have so far failed to yield a new contract.

Betsy Kaplan

Women scientists and inventors have been making ground-breaking discoveries since Agnodike pretended to be a man in order to become the first female anatomist in ancient Greece. Yet, women's scientific contributions have historically been hidden in the footnotes of the work men claimed as their own. 

A Hartford Distributors building is seen behind a yellow police tape, in Manchester, Conn., Thursday, Aug. 5, 2010. Eight people were killed Tuesday when Omar Thornton opened fire after a disciplinary hearing at the beer distributorship in Manchester.
Steven Senne / Associated Press

According to a new study, there's been a rise in the number of fatal workplace shootings that are unrelated to robberies. Workplace shootings aren't uncommon, but they don't always make headlines unless multiple people are killed. 

Jeffrey Smith / Creative Commons

Listen live on Monday at 9:00 am.

job while also raising a family.

This hour, we take a deep dive into the realities of modern-day motherhood. We talk with a sociologist who spent years in the field interviewing working moms. We also get a local perspective, and we want to hear from you. 

Sarah Locke, of New Haven, identifies as queer and is on the steering committee at CT Equality. Locke said she supports a paid family medical leave bill, but hopes it's inclusive and considers people in the LGBTQ community when defining "family."
Nicole Leonard / Connecticut Public Radio

Sarah Locke got excited when she heard that Connecticut lawmakers are trying to bring paid family medical leave to her home state, but then it gave her pause.

Image of twenty dollar bills
Martin Vorel / Libreshot

Progressive lawmakers around the country have been rallying behind a call for a $15 minimum wage, and Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont has joined their ranks.

This hour, what would increasing the minimum wage by almost 150 percent over the next four years mean for businesses and workers here in Connecticut? We hear from an economist and get the takes of several local business owners on Democrats’ proposal to increase the minimum wage to $15 per hour by 2023.

Adam Hushin / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut has launched a new collaborative effort to support manufacturing industry in the state. The collaboration, called “TEAM Works,” -- Technology, Education, and Advanced Manufacturing -- joins together Connecticut’s public and private colleges, comprehensive and technical high schools, small and large manufacturers, and state agencies. 

Harriet Jones / Connecticut Public Radio

Governor Dannel Malloy faced many challenges in his eight year tenure. While the state budget crisis may have grabbed the headlines, other structural issues with Connecticut’s economy also consumed his attention. One of the biggest of these - the skills gap. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

United Technologies, headquartered in Farmington, Connecticut, has announced it will break into three companies by 2020. What will this mean for jobs and business in the state? This hour, we take a closer look.

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