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Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

President Trump has denied keeping details of his meetings with Russian President Vladimir Putin from his own administration.

"I'm not keeping anything under wraps. I couldn't care less," Trump said in an interview with Jeanine Pirro on Fox News on Saturday night.

The partial shutdown of the federal government is causing some financial problems for furloughed workers who can't refinance their mortgages or buy homes because lenders can't verify their income. But unpaid federal employees aren't the only ones running into problems.

Libby Anderson, for example, got her final divorce decree on Tuesday. She'd hoped that would mean her ex-husband would finally move out of their Des Moines, Iowa, home, where they've been living separate lives under one roof for eight months.

The government's partial shutdown has turned Washington's National Mall into a bleak place. Trash cans are overflowing, museums and historic sites are shuttered. Park Service rangers and Smithsonian employees are furloughed as the shutdown drags on.

At Ardovino's Desert Crossing, an Italian restaurant in southern New Mexico, it's not unusual for diners to look up from their gnocchi and see Border Patrol agents outside aiming flashlights at footprints on the ground.

Updated at 4:49 p.m. ET

President Trump's nominee to become the next attorney general began his round of visits to Capitol Hill on Wednesday as Washington prepared for a changing of the guard at the Justice Department.

William Barr was scheduled to meet with at least three key Senate Judiciary Committee Republicans ahead of his confirmation hearing scheduled for next week.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

Tensions remain high and a sense of urgency has set in as the partial shutdown of the federal government begins to affect more Americans.

Ben Seese / Creative Commons

The reactions to Representative Rashida Tlaib's profanity and her calls for impeachment against the president have been mixed.

While most Republicans are in sync in their outrage over her comments, Democrats are further apart. 

Updated at 7:27 p.m. ET

A closed-door briefing for congressional leaders in the White House Situation Room on Wednesday failed to resolve any issues between Democrats and the Trump administration over funding for border security.

The stalemate has led to a partial government shutdown, now nearing the two-week mark.

"I don't think any particular progress was made," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., told reporters afterward.

Updated at 5:20 a.m. ET on Thursday

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump traveled to Iraq to visit U.S. troops on the day after Christmas, an unannounced trip about which the president nonetheless had been hinting for some time.

The Trumps' arrival at Al Asad Air Base followed the president's recent orders to pull back on U.S. troop deployments elsewhere — orders that have come under intense scrutiny.

Updated at 7:25 p.m. ET

A federal judge delayed sentencing former national security adviser Michael Flynn on Tuesday after he pleaded guilty to lying to investigators about his talks with Russia's ambassador.

U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan said he has significant outstanding questions about the case, including how the government's Russia investigation was impeded and the material impact of Flynn's lies on the special counsel's inquiry.

Updated at 9:47 a.m. ET

Each new dawn seems to bring a major new headline in the Russia investigation, including a number of important courtroom developments this month.

Here's what you need to know about what has happened so far this week in this often complex and fast-moving saga.

Michael Cohen is going to prison, but he says he isn't finished yet

Lawyers for former national security adviser Michael Flynn are asking a judge to spare him prison time, citing his acceptance of responsibility and extensive cooperation with authorities, which spanned more than 62 hours and included turning over "sweeping categories" of documents and electronic devices.

The attorneys are requesting that Flynn receive no more than one year of probation, with minimal supervision, and 200 hours of community service.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

President Trump says he will be making a decision "soon" on a new chief of staff. But some of the candidates whose names have been floated for the post say they're not interested.

It seems people are not exactly lining up for the chance to try to organize Trump's impulsive and unpredictable operation, especially in the face of an aggressive special counsel's investigation and newly empowered Democrats in the House of Representatives.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When it comes to being a check on the president's power, many say Congress has fallen down on the job. But another force has risen up to take over that role: state attorneys general.

Last week in the Russia investigations: The special counsel ties up loose ends, but that may not mean the finish line is any closer.

Endings and beginnings

Never mind that it still isn't fully clear what the Russia imbroglio is — what picture all the puzzle pieces are supposed to form when they're put together.

An even more basic question that's just as difficult to answer is: How much longer will it go?

Updated on Friday at 2:44 p.m. ET.

From Fox & Friends to the State Department, and now likely to the United Nations.

President Trump says he will nominate Heather Nauert, the State Department spokeswoman and a former Fox News host, to become the next ambassador to the U.N.

"She's very talented, very smart, very quick, and I think she's going to be respected by all, so Heather Nauert will be nominated for the ambassador to the United Nations," Trump told reporters Friday.

In a case that could shed light on the finances of the secretive Trump Organization, a federal judge has signed orders to issue 30 subpoenas on behalf of the attorneys general of Maryland and the District of Columbia in their lawsuit alleging that President Trump is profiting from foreign and state governments' spending at the Trump International Hotel in downtown Washington, D.C.

Updated at 9:38 p.m. ET

Former national security adviser Michael Flynn has provided "substantial" aid in the Russia investigation and beyond — and that merits a judge's consideration at Flynn's sentencing this month, prosecutors said in court papers late Tuesday.

The government said in a memo to a federal judge that it believes sentencing for Flynn should be lenient and that even a sentence without prison time "is appropriate and warranted."

Ninian Reid / Creative Commons

New York University researchers say they've found a link between appeal for President Trump and a certain, specific segment of the male population: those with "fragile masculinity."

Their research is based on Google searches for "erectile dysfunction," "hair loss," "Viagra," and some other words we may refrain from mentioning.

George Herbert Walker Bush died late Friday. For many in the community surrounding Walker's Point in Kennebunkport, Maine, the former president was much more than the leader of the free world — he was their beloved friend and neighbor.

Updated at 12:30 p.m. ET

Just moments after Air Force One lifted off for Buenos Aires, Argentina — where President Trump was to meet with Russian President Vladimir Putin — Trump canceled the meeting via tweet. He cited intensifying Russian aggression toward Ukraine.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

A judge denied requests on Sunday from former Trump campaign aide George Papadopoulos to delay his scheduled sentence to prison. He'll head there Monday and stay for two weeks.

Papadopoulos pleaded guilty last year to lying to the FBI about his relationship with Russian officials and their intermediaries during the 2016 presidential election.

Updated Saturday at 4:00 p.m. ET

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., delivered a decisive blow to President Trump Friday, ruling in favor of CNN and the news media.

Judge Timothy Kelly, a Trump appointee, ordered the White House to restore correspondent Jim Acosta's press credentials, something the White House said later it would do.

A federal judge in Washington, D.C., delayed his decision until Friday morning on CNN's lawsuit seeking immediate restoration of chief White House correspondent Jim Acosta's press pass.

A decision had been expected Thursday afternoon.

Earlier this week, CNN sued President Trump and other White House officials, contending that they acted unconstitutionally when they stripped Acosta of his press credentials, known as a "hard pass." The network is seeking a temporary restraining order while the case plays out.

Michael Avenatti, the attorney for adult film star Stormy Daniels in her legal battles with President Trump, was arrested Wednesday following an allegation of domestic violence, according to the Los Angeles Police Department.

Avenatti, who has denied the allegation, was booked Wednesday afternoon after police took a report on Tuesday of the alleged incident. He was released on $50,000 bail.

Acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker could make life quite difficult for Justice Department special counsel Robert Mueller if he wanted.

The biggest question in Washington is: Will he?

The acting head of the Justice Department took over on Wednesday from former Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who was forced out after months of verbal abuse by President Trump.

Updated at 9:40 p.m. ET

The White House announced late Wednesday that it is temporarily suspending press credentials from CNN's Jim Acosta.

The announcement came in a statement by White House press secretary Sarah Sanders. It followed an unusually contentious press conference held by President Trump in the East Room of the White House in which the president called Acosta "a rude, terrible person."

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley has announced she will resign from the post by year's end, raising questions and speculation as to who will fill the high-ranking vacancy.

This hour, we examine one possible candidate: former Connecticut U.S. Senator Joe Lieberman. What qualifications would Lieberman bring to the position? And what would it take for him to be confirmed?

Later, we talk about trends in U.S. civics education. Are children who are exposed to the topic earlier more likely to develop into engaged voters?

And finally, controversy surrounding New Britain’s Paul Manafort Sr. Drive has drawn attention to a lesser-known Connecticut son, Ebenezer Bassett. Who was he? And how should the state honor his legacy? 

One of the last secrets from the Watergate scandal could soon be revealed.

A federal judge in Washington has ordered the National Archives to review key documents that have remained under seal for 44 years and prepare for their release.

Those papers, known as the "road map," helped advance the impeachment effort aimed at then-President Richard Nixon.

They've been under wraps since then but scholars say they're newly relevant today as President Trump faces down a different investigation.

A couple of Connecticut political scientists are not surprised by speculation in Washington that former U.S. Senator Joe Lieberman of Connecticut is on the White House short list to replace U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley.

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