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Declan McEnroe / Connecticut Public Radio

Tens of thousands of homes in Connecticut lost power Thursday night as severe thunderstorms swept the eastern seaboard. Downed trees and power lines closed roads in cities and towns across the state, and dozens of school districts have delayed starts or canceled classes Friday.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Over 78,000 homes and businesses in Connecticut lost power after strong winds knocked down trees and power lines Wednesday night.

Steven Senne / Associated Press

Two years after Hurricane Maria devastated the island of Puerto Rico, the response to the crisis on the U.S. mainland is only now coming into focus. 

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

U.S. congressional representatives marked the upcoming two-year anniversary of Hurricane Maria by observing a day of action for Puerto Rico Wednesday in Washington D.C.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Creative Commons

We want to hear your thoughts on what it's like to be "living in a Trump salad," on this all-call Monday. (Colin coined the term.)

First, there's #sharpiegate. Last week, President Trump unleashed on the media for reporting his error tweeting  a warning about Hurricane Dorian that included the state of Alabama. To prevent mass evacuation, the National Weather Service corrected his error. Alabama was not in danger. 

Staff at Americares, a Stamford, Connecticut-based nonprofit, move supplies as they prepare to deploy a team to the Bahamas to provide medical relief after Hurricane Dorian.
Americares

A Connecticut nonprofit has deployed help to those impacted by Hurricane Dorian.

Stamford-based Americares now has a team on the ground in the Bahamas just after the Category 5 hurricane leveled the two northernmost Bahamian islands.

Ramon Espinosa / AP Photo

Relief efforts are underway in the Bahamas after Hurricane Dorian devastated the islands that make up the country.

Updated at 1:05 a.m. ET Thursday

Hurricane Dorian is strengthening again and is now a Category 3 storm with maximum sustained winds of 115 mph, although "some fluctuations in intensity are expected during the next 12 hours," according to the National Hurricane Center.

At least 20 people have died in the Bahamas as a result of Dorian, local officials say.

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A commercial satellite image shows just how much of Grand Bahama Island is underwater following days of torrential rain and massive storm surge from Hurricane Dorian.

Updated at 11:20 p.m. ET

Hurricane Dorian is predicted to hit Florida and the northern Bahamas this weekend as an extremely dangerous, slow-moving Category 4 storm, bringing intense rains and sustained winds of 130 mph, the National Hurricane Center says.

With favorable conditions and very warm waters ahead, Dorian is expected to have a fearsome growth spurt. As the NHC says in its 11 p.m. ET update, "Hurricane Hunter aircraft find a strengthening Dorian."

Updated at 5:10 a.m. ET Thursday

Hurricane Dorian is "expected to become a major hurricane on Friday," according to the National Hurricane Center.

Maximum sustained winds at 5 a.m. ET Thursday were 85 mph — a Category 1 hurricane — with higher gusts, according to the center's most recent update. Dorian was about 150 miles north northwest of Puerto Rico, moving about 13 mph toward the northwest.

National Hurricane Center / National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

As another major storm approaches Puerto Rico, the people on the island are still thinking of when Hurricane Maria made landfall there in 2017.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The National Weather Service placed Connecticut under an “excessive heat watch” this weekend. Just after noon on Saturday in Middletown, the temperature climbed to 100 degrees, according to Weather.com. It felt like 113 degrees as stifling humidity enveloped the air.

Petteri Jarvinen / Flickr

The forecast projects one of the hottest weekends across Connecticut so far this year, with temperatures expected to rise into the triple digits. 

The part of the street where Ridge Road meets Lexington Avenue in Danbury was closed after a telephone pole snapped and took down power lines.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

One year after tornadoes ripped through Connecticut, many residents are still struggling with post-storm cleanup. In response, federal lawmakers announced Monday that they’re reintroducing what they call the DEBRIS Act (Diversifying Emergency Benchmarks for the Recovery of Individuals after Storms). 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut lawmakers want Congress to send more disaster relief dollars to Puerto Rico.

As the climate warms, Americans – and New Englanders – appear to be finding abnormal temperatures less and less remarkable.

Updated 12:15 p.m. ET Monday

Rescuers in eastern Alabama combed through the debris from homes ripped apart by powerful tornadoes that swept through the area on Sunday, killing at least 23 people.

Lee County Sheriff Jay Jones confirmed to media outlets Sunday the number of dead. He told The Associated Press late Sunday evening that children are among the dead, and that it is possible that the death toll could continue to rise.

Lee County is located in the east central part of the state, along the border with Georgia.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Most of Connecticut received between 8 to 12 inches of heavy snow in a late-winter storm. Schools across the state are closed and many businesses, colleges, and the state government are opening late. 

Students board a bus after being dismissed from the Dr. Ramon Betances Elementary School in Hartford, Conn., on Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019.
Dave Collins / Associated Press

A winter weather system moved into Connecticut Tuesday, sparing the heaviest part of the morning commute. But many schools across the state closed in anticipation of messy conditions by midday.

"It's cold, you're lonely, [and] you feel like there's nobody out there for you," said Andrew Carrington, who slept outside once when it was nine degrees. "It's despair."
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state activated its severe weather protocol as temperatures dropped toward a low of three degrees in parts of Connecticut Wednesday night and Thursday morning.

Connecticut State Police / Facebook

State police say Connecticut drivers need to be on the lookout for ice missiles -- chunks of flying ice that leave one car and hit another.

Jimmy Crespo of Hartford received a new pair of Wolverine boots as part of a winter charity effort put together by Footwear With Care. That nonprofit held a 'Winter Boot Party' in Hartford Saturday, December 8, 2018.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A local nonprofit outfitted about 400 people with a brand new pair of boots and a fresh pair of socks at an event called the “Winter Boot Party” at the Christ Church Cathedral in Hartford Saturday.

Courtesy Amy Blumenreder

Much of Connecticut ground to a halt Thursday evening, as drivers and state crews seemed caught unaware by the first snow of the winter.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

At least 11 people have died from Hurricane Michael, which slammed into Florida's Panhandle with 155-mph winds on Wednesday. The storm hacked a trail of catastrophic destruction in Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia before finally heading back out over water.

Five deaths were reported in Virginia, in addition to four in Florida, one in Georgia and one in North Carolina.

Updated at 2:00 a.m. ET Wednesday

Hurricane Michael has grown into a Category 4 hurricane, with sustained winds reaching 130 mph, as it barrels toward northwestern Florida, making it a much stronger storm than Hurricane Florence was when it made landfall as a Category 1 storm drenching the Carolinas last month, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Updated at 11:55 p.m. ET

Hurricane Michael is expected to strengthen rapidly over the next 24 to 36 hours and will be "a dangerous major hurricane when it reaches the northeastern Gulf Coast on Wednesday," the National Hurricane Center says.

The storm achieved hurricane status with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph Monday morning, triggering warnings of a life-threatening storm surge that could hit the Florida Gulf Coast. Later in the day, its sustained winds topped 90 mph, with stronger gusts.

Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

Tuesday’s severe weather dumped several inches of rain on New Britain. A local art exhibit came very close to being destroyed due to flooding.

Rhode Island and the South Coast recently experienced the aftermath of Hurricane Florence -- nothing too major, just a few inches of rain. However, this time 80 years ago was a completely different story. 

  

NASA

The country watched Hurricane Florence pummel communities across the Carolinas this week, leaving flooding, destruction, and death in its path.

This hour we ask New York Times climate reporter Kendra Pierre-Louis--is climate change causing these devastating storms to become more common?

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