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The part of the street where Ridge Road meets Lexington Avenue in Danbury was closed after a telephone pole snapped and took down power lines.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

One year after tornadoes ripped through Connecticut, many residents are still struggling with post-storm cleanup. In response, federal lawmakers announced Monday that they’re reintroducing what they call the DEBRIS Act (Diversifying Emergency Benchmarks for the Recovery of Individuals after Storms). 

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Connecticut lawmakers want Congress to send more disaster relief dollars to Puerto Rico.

As the climate warms, Americans – and New Englanders – appear to be finding abnormal temperatures less and less remarkable.

Updated 12:15 p.m. ET Monday

Rescuers in eastern Alabama combed through the debris from homes ripped apart by powerful tornadoes that swept through the area on Sunday, killing at least 23 people.

Lee County Sheriff Jay Jones confirmed to media outlets Sunday the number of dead. He told The Associated Press late Sunday evening that children are among the dead, and that it is possible that the death toll could continue to rise.

Lee County is located in the east central part of the state, along the border with Georgia.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Most of Connecticut received between 8 to 12 inches of heavy snow in a late-winter storm. Schools across the state are closed and many businesses, colleges, and the state government are opening late. 

Students board a bus after being dismissed from the Dr. Ramon Betances Elementary School in Hartford, Conn., on Thursday, Jan. 31, 2019.
Dave Collins / Associated Press

A winter weather system moved into Connecticut Tuesday, sparing the heaviest part of the morning commute. But many schools across the state closed in anticipation of messy conditions by midday.

"It's cold, you're lonely, [and] you feel like there's nobody out there for you," said Andrew Carrington, who slept outside once when it was nine degrees. "It's despair."
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

The state activated its severe weather protocol as temperatures dropped toward a low of three degrees in parts of Connecticut Wednesday night and Thursday morning.

Connecticut State Police / Facebook

State police say Connecticut drivers need to be on the lookout for ice missiles -- chunks of flying ice that leave one car and hit another.

Jimmy Crespo of Hartford received a new pair of Wolverine boots as part of a winter charity effort put together by Footwear With Care. That nonprofit held a 'Winter Boot Party' in Hartford Saturday, December 8, 2018.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

A local nonprofit outfitted about 400 people with a brand new pair of boots and a fresh pair of socks at an event called the “Winter Boot Party” at the Christ Church Cathedral in Hartford Saturday.

Courtesy Amy Blumenreder

Much of Connecticut ground to a halt Thursday evening, as drivers and state crews seemed caught unaware by the first snow of the winter.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

At least 11 people have died from Hurricane Michael, which slammed into Florida's Panhandle with 155-mph winds on Wednesday. The storm hacked a trail of catastrophic destruction in Georgia, the Carolinas and Virginia before finally heading back out over water.

Five deaths were reported in Virginia, in addition to four in Florida, one in Georgia and one in North Carolina.

Updated at 2:00 a.m. ET Wednesday

Hurricane Michael has grown into a Category 4 hurricane, with sustained winds reaching 130 mph, as it barrels toward northwestern Florida, making it a much stronger storm than Hurricane Florence was when it made landfall as a Category 1 storm drenching the Carolinas last month, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Updated at 11:55 p.m. ET

Hurricane Michael is expected to strengthen rapidly over the next 24 to 36 hours and will be "a dangerous major hurricane when it reaches the northeastern Gulf Coast on Wednesday," the National Hurricane Center says.

The storm achieved hurricane status with maximum sustained winds of 75 mph Monday morning, triggering warnings of a life-threatening storm surge that could hit the Florida Gulf Coast. Later in the day, its sustained winds topped 90 mph, with stronger gusts.

Amar Batra / Connecticut Public Radio

Tuesday’s severe weather dumped several inches of rain on New Britain. A local art exhibit came very close to being destroyed due to flooding.

Rhode Island and the South Coast recently experienced the aftermath of Hurricane Florence -- nothing too major, just a few inches of rain. However, this time 80 years ago was a completely different story. 

  

NASA

The country watched Hurricane Florence pummel communities across the Carolinas this week, leaving flooding, destruction, and death in its path.

This hour we ask New York Times climate reporter Kendra Pierre-Louis--is climate change causing these devastating storms to become more common?

Updated at 3:55 a.m. ET on Monday

Tropical Depression Florence is continuing to bring relentless, torrential rain to much of the South. Florence has already set a record for rainfall in the state of North Carolina, and thousands have evacuated to shelters in North and South Carolina to ride out the storm.

More than 500,000 remain without electricity in North Carolina.

The U.S. Coast Guard working in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence in Newport, North Carolina.
Jacob B. Derry / U.S. Air Force

As Hurricane Florence came ashore in the Carolinas, insurance companies prepared to process thousands of claims. The storm combined high winds and continues to bring massive amounts of rain. 

Updated at 6:15 a.m. ET on Wednesday

The severity of Hurricane Florence, a Category 4 storm, is intensifying and triggering hurricane warnings along the coasts of the Carolinas, the National Hurricane Center announced in its 5 a.m. Wednesday update.

Updated at 5 a.m. ET on Tuesday

Hurricane Florence is growing in size and strength as it barrels toward the Southeastern U.S. for an expected landfall in the Carolinas later this week as an "extremely dangerous hurricane," according to the National Hurricane Center.

martymcpadden / Creative Commons

With climate change come looming questions about the future of Connecticut's shoreline. Among them: How will sea level rise and extreme weather events alter the shape of the state's coast? And what will happen to the residents -- the people and native species -- who live there?

Coming up, local experts join us to offer some insight and talk about the ways municipalities are planning for the challenges that lie ahead. 

Updated at 11:30 p.m. ET

Hurricane Lane weakened Friday evening as it headed toward Hawaii.

The National Weather Service said "Lane weakens to a tropical storm south of Oahu but rain bands will still bring more flooding and damaging winds to parts of the main Hawaiian Islands."

Though the hurricane had been downgraded to a tropical storm, maximum sustained winds of 70 mph brought warnings of potential damage as it moved west toward the island of Oahu.

Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

Cleanup continues more than two months after a tornado hit Sleeping Giant State Park in Hamden - one of several tornados that touched down in Connecticut during severe storms in May.

Dramatic weather events happened this past week in many parts of the Northern Hemisphere. There were wildfires in Greece, Scandinavia, and the Western U.S. Flooding followed record rainfalls in the Northeast. And dangerous heat waves settled over the Southwest, Japan, and the U.K.

If it continues like this, 2018 could end up being one of the hottest years on record.

Ryan Caron King / Connecticut Public Radio

Alberto Díaz lost most of what he had when Maria passed through. Nine months later, he is making opportunity out of disaster. His kitchen is a kitchen again. He used some wood he found to make a homemade tostonera -- a tool for smashing green plantains. Someone was throwing out a basketball court, so he took it, cleaned it, cut it, and now he’s got new wooden floors.

Andrew Malone / Creative Commons

The recent heat wave is set to come to an end, but temperatures are expected to stay in the low 90’s until the end of the week. Officials warned people to stay inside and keep cool in order to avoid heat related illness.

Lori Mack / CT Public Radio

Officials from the Federal Emergency Management Agency are assessing the damage caused by multiple tornadoes and storms that hit Connecticut last month. Two people died and more than 120,000 homes and businesses lost power.

Centers for Disease Control And Prevention (CDC)

Amid the high-profile deaths of Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain came news of a new CDC report outlining a rise in U.S. suicide rates. This hour, we take an in-depth look at the numbers with Dr. Jill Harkavy-Friedman of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

Plus: On the heels of last month’s violent storms, we hear about efforts underway to restore one of the state’s most damaged -- and beloved -- outdoor areas: Sleeping Giant State Park.

And finally: In search of a good ol' non-fiction murder mystery? Or, better yet, one with a Connecticut twist? Look no further than New London’s The Day. A little later, reporter Karen Florin and digital news director Carlos Virgen take us behind the scenes of the newspaper's new crime podcast, Case Unsolved. Have you been listening?

Tom Tyler, director of Connecticut State Parks, inside Sleeping Giant's picnic area. This and other parts of the park were destroyed following severe storms. Tyler said he's "optimistic" parts will re-open before the fall.
Patrick Skahill / Connecticut Public Radio

In May, several tornadoes touched down in Connecticut -- destroying homes, uprooting trees and knocking out power to thousands of customers. The weather also devastated several state parks, including the iconic Sleeping Giant State Park in Hamden.

Hurricanes are moving more slowly over both land and water, and that's bad news for communities in their path.

In the past 70 years, tropical cyclones around the world have slowed down 10 percent, and in some regions of the world, the change has been even more significant, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

That means storms are spending more time hanging out, battering buildings with wind and dropping more rain.

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