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Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Creative Commons

President Trump leaves chaos in his wake.

There is chaos in Syria. Turkish artillery fire is targeting the Kurdish-led militia that has been allied with U.S. Special Forces over the last five years in their war against ISIS. Syrians are fleeing their homes, ISIS prisoners are escaping from prisons no longer guarded by the Kurds, and the last U.S. troops pulled out on Sunday.

Azad Hamoto has an aunt in Syria who is likely to join many of the other Kurds who've been displaced by war. Hamoto spoke to reporters at a news conference in Hartford on October 10.
Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Kurds in Connecticut are concerned for loved ones in northern Syria following a military attack by Turkey.

The invasion began Wednesday – three days after President Donald Trump abruptly announced he’d withdraw U.S. troops from the area.

Updated at 1:05 p.m. ET

The White House announced late Sunday that Turkey is ready to launch an offensive in northern Syria and that U.S. forces will stand aside, renewing fears that America is abandoning Kurdish allies who stood on the front line in the years-long fight against ISIS.

A two-paragraph statement released by White House press secretary Stephanie Grisham said that President Trump and Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan had spoken by telephone and that "Turkey will soon be moving forward with its long-planned operation in northern Syria."

Rich Pendroncelli / Associated Press

The World War II era B-17 aircraft that crashed at Bradley International Airport Wednesday morning was considered a "warbird" - restored vintage military aircraft operated mostly by civilian organizations for historic purposes.

“There are a handful, under a dozen airworthy B-17s out there,” said Bob Stangerone of the New England Air Museum in Windsor Locks, “and then there are several dozen in storage and on static display.”

Stangerone said none of these existing B-17s ever saw combat duty.

Ryan Lindsay / Connecticut Public Radio

Forty years ago, a film called Hair starring a budding actor from Connecticut debuted at The Cannes Film Festival. It was 1979, the Vietnam War was over as were the days of hippies and The Black Panthers. Yet then and now, the on-screen musical still has a way of reaching audiences from past and present.

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library

Newly discovered papers from an 18th century Yale alumnus offer a fresh look at campus life during the Revolutionary War.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public Radio

From the bestselling author of Lilac Girls comes a new novel. It's called Lost Roses and it centers on Eliza Ferriday, a one-time Connecticut resident and mother of esteemed philanthropist Caroline Ferriday.

This hour, author Martha Hall Kelly returns to our studios to talk about the book, and about her experience researching war and revolution in the early 20th century. 

Retired Pvt. Leslie P. Cruise, 95, remembers June 6, 1944, clearly. Standing at the airplane's edge, preparing to jump onto the enemy lines of Normandy on D-Day, fear didn't occur to him.

"It was very moving and exciting," Cruise tells NPR's Noel King. "We fly over the channel; you can look out the window and see the silhouettes of the ships. We know what's going to happen now. We've talked about it, but look at all those ships down there, my gosh."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When Rabbi Philip Lazowski was just eleven years old, the Nazis invaded his hometown and began the mass slaughter of Jewish residents.

This hour we sit down with Rabbi Lazowski, a Holocaust survivor and longtime leader in the Greater Hartford Jewish community, to hear his story. After witnessing one of the worst sides of humanity, how did he maintain his faith and find the strength to help others?

Almigdad Mojalli / Voice of America/Wikimedia Commons

Tens of thousands have died in Yemen as a Saudi-led bombing campaign continues to fuel a devastating civil war. And the U.S. has been fueling military efforts by Saudi Arabia in this four year conflict.

This hour, we ask Connecticut Senator Chris Murphy: what are the next steps to address this humanitarian crisis, now that the senate has failed to override the president’s veto of a resolution to end American involvement in the war?

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu ordered "massive strikes" against militant groups in Gaza on Sunday in response to a barrage of rocket fire, stretching hostilities into a third day and leading to mounting casualties on both sides.

At a cabinet meeting on Sunday Netanyahu said he also instructed military leaders to boost tank artillery and infantry forces around the Gaza Strip.

"Hamas bears responsibility not only for its own attacks and actions but also those by Islamic Jihad, for which it pays a very high price," he said.

Wikipedia / Creative Commons

Do you rush to the store to buy food before a snowstorm? Do you buy flashlights and a generator in case the power goes out? Do you insure your home, your car, your health against catastrophe?

Renée H. was a child during the Holocaust. Her story is part of the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale University.
Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies

Security has been stepped up at Jewish synagogues around the state. Thursday is Yom Hashoah - Holocaust Remembrance Day - and as people gather to honor the 6 million lives lost, they’ll also remember those killed in shootings at synagogues in California and Pennsylvania.

Chion Wolf / WNPR, Connecticut Public Radio

From the bestselling author of Lilac Girls comes a new novel. It's called Lost Roses and it centers on Eliza Ferriday, a one-time Connecticut resident and mother of esteemed philanthropist Caroline Ferriday.

This hour, author Martha Hall Kelly returns to our studios to talk about the book, and about her experience researching war and revolution in the early 20th century. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

What’s it like to build a house, a family, a life… and then have a war take it all away?  

This hour we sit down with West Hartford, Connecticut residents Adeebah Alnemar and her son, Naji Aldabaan. They’re Syrian refugees who fled during the civil war, and came to Connecticut in 2016.

Their family is the subject of a 2018 Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoon series in The New York Times. We also talk with one of the people behind the cartoon series—New Haven-based journalist Jake Halpern.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

Between War & Here is a one-of-a-kind collaboration, which serves not only as a reminder of the U.S.' ongoing involvement in war, but also as a lens into the complexities of U.S. veterans' experiences.

This hour, we sit down with one of the creative forces behind the show and hear from one of its narrators: longtime foreign correspondent Anne Garrels.

Plus, we learn about an event at the Mystic Seaport Museum, which spotlights women in the maritime industry. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

What’s it like to build a house, a family, a life…and then have a war take it all away?  

This hour we sit down with West Hartford, Connecticut residents Adeebah Alnemar and her son, Naji Aldabaan. They’re Syrian refugees who fled during the civil war, and came to Connecticut in 2016.

Their family is the subject of a 2018 Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoon series in the New York Times. We also talk with one of the people behind the cartoon series—New Haven-based journalist Jake Halpern.

Philip Dawe / John Carter Brown Library

Lin-Manuel Miranda's Hamilton has inspired millions to learn more about the founding of America. Some may be moved by a story of scrappy underdogs fighting for freedom against all odds. Others may wonder if America has ever lived up to the ideals assured in our Constitution. 

Updated at 5:42 p.m. ET

Four Americans were killed in an explosion while conducting a routine patrol in northern Syria, according to the Pentagon. The Islamic State has claimed responsibility.

Two U.S. service members, one civilian employee of the Defense Intelligence Agency and one contractor working as an interpreter died in the attack in Manbij. Three service members were injured.

Chion Wolf / Connecticut Public

Rabbi Philip Lazowski has been a longtime leader in the greater Hartford area. He was Rabbi of Beth Hillel Synagogue in Bloomfield for 45 years and he is currently Chaplain for the State Senate, Hartford Hospital, and the Hartford Police Department. But when he was 11 years old, Nazis invaded Poland and slaughtered Jewish residents in his hometown of Bielica, Poland.  

A Nazi war criminal, living safely in the United States until his deportation to Germany last year, has died. He had been the last known World War II Nazi living in the U.S.

Updated at 2:47 p.m. EST

President Trump and U.S. Central Command on Sunday confirmed that a United States airstrike in Yemen has killed one of the militants believed to be behind the deadly USS Cole bombing in 2000.

Chion Wolf / WNPR/Connecticut Public Radio

When Rabbi Philip Lazowski was just eleven years old, the Nazis invaded his hometown and began the mass slaughter of Jewish residents.

This hour we sit down with Rabbi Lazowski, a Holocaust survivor and longtime leader in the Greater Hartford Jewish community, to hear his story. After witnessing one of the worst sides of humanity, how did he maintain his faith and find the strength to help others?

Lynsey Addario

This hour, Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Lynsey Addario joins us. We talk about her career and her new book, Of Love & War, and learn about her upbringing in Westport, Connecticut.

Later, we sit down with world record holder Lhakpa Sherpa. A dishwasher at Whole Foods in West Hartford, is also the only woman to complete nine... yes, nine... expeditions to the summit of Mount Everest. We hear about her remarkable journey as a climber, an immigrant, and a single mother.

Frankie Graziano / Connecticut Public Radio

Yemeni-Americans living in Connecticut are asking people to put pressure on their elected representatives over U.S. involvement in Yemen’s ongoing civil war.

Salvador Dalí (Spanish, 1904-1989), Apparition of Face and Fruit Dish on a Beach, 1938. Oil on canvas, 45 x 56 5/8 in.

Salvador Dali and Max Ernst are among the Surrealist artists whose works are on view in Monsters & Myths, an exhibit at the Wadsworth Atheneum in Hartford. This hour, we go behind the scenes and take an in-depth look at Connecticut's place within the Surrealist movement. 

United Kingdom Government / Wikimedia Commons

This weekend was the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. World leaders convened in Paris and listened to French president Emmanuel Macron warn against reviving the "old demons" of nationalism that led to our first world war. 

David McGhee grew up with two mysteries. One was his grandmother's suitcase — it was full of stuff she shared with no one. The other mystery was about the boy's grandfather, a soldier who died before David was born.

David was only 9 years old when he first got a glimpse of what was inside his grandmother's suitcase.

"She was actually going in for something else, but I saw that picture," David said, asking her who was in that photo. It was her parents, she told him. She then quickly zipped up the suitcase. She didn't speak another word about it.

The humanitarian situation in Yemen is worsening, with millions of children at risk of starvation and fighting intensifying despite international pressure for a cease-fire in the country's civil war, according to a senior United Nations official who last week visited the rebel-held port of Hodeidah.

Lynsey Addario

This hour, we sit down with Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Lynsey Addario. We talk about her career and her new book, Of Love & War, and learn about her upbringing in Westport, Connecticut.

Later, we discuss the effects of trauma on journalists and other members of the media. Bruce Shapiro of the Dart Center at Columbia University joins us, and we also hear from you. 

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